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Topic: Musa ibn Nusair


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  IslamBasics
Musa sent Tarif ibn Malik, one of his generals, with four hundred infantrymen and a hundred cavalrymen to raid on the coasts of the south of Spain.
Musa resumed the siege and achieved the opening on the day of 'Id Al-Fitr 94 A.H. He concluded a treaty with them that stated that all the possessions of the men slain on the day of the ambush, the properties of the runaways, and the churches with their fortunes belonged to the Muslims.
Musa and Tariq entered Damascus in the year 96 A.H. Caliph Al-Walid ibn 'Abdul Malik had ordered the greatest and most honored reception for the victorious generals in the Sufyani mosque, where hundreds of Spaniards and many captives showed their obedience to the Commander of the Faithful.
www.islambasics.com /view.php?bkID=119&chapter=15   (2174 words)

  
  Musa bin Nusair - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Musa bin Nusair (Arabic: موسى بن نصير‎; 640—716) was a Yemeni Muslim governor and general under the Umayyads.
Musa was planning an invasion of the rest of Europe when he was recalled to Damascus by Al-Waleed.
Ibn Abd-el-Hakem, Medieval Sourcebook: The Islamic Conquest of Spain
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Musa_ibn_Nusair   (512 words)

  
 Tarif ibn Malluk - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Tarif ibn Malluk (Arabic: طريف بن مالك‎) was a Berber commander under Musa ibn Nusair, the Muslim conqueror of North Africa.
In July of 710 CE, Musa sent Tarif on a raid to test the southern coastline of the Iberian peninsula.
The end result was a successful raid into an unguarded portion of Andalusia, followed by the safe return of the raiders with plunder and captives.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Tarif_ibn_Malik   (209 words)

  
 Musa bin Nusair - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
Musa bin Nusair (640—716) was a Yemeni Muslim governor and general under the Umayyads.
Among the factions were the sons of a recently deceased king who felt that they had unfairly been stripped of power.
Musa bin Nusair, See also, External links, Yemeni people, 640 births and 716 deaths.
www.arikah.net /encyclopedia/Musa_ibn_Nusayr   (527 words)

  
 Islam Online - Famous Muslim Names
Musa was planning an invasion of the rest of Europe when he was recalled to Damascus by Al-Waleed.
He was initially the deputy of Musa ibn Nusair in North Africa, and was sent by his superior to the Iberian Peninsula in order to intervene at the request of the heirs of the Visigothic King, Wittiza in the Visigothic civil war.
Ibn al Haitham's influence on physical sciences in general and optics in particular has been held in high esteem and in fact it ushered in a new era in optical research both in theory and practice.
www.parvez-video.com /islam_line.asp   (5565 words)

  
 The routes of al-Andalus: Background
The agreement concluded between 'Abdul'azîz ibn Mûsà ibn Nusair and Theodomir is a case in point.
Bilingualism and multilingualism affected the language of the natives of al-Andalus and the Hebrew of the Jews, while everyone vied to be proficient in Arabic, a language in which authors, writers and poets of all races and religions distinguished themselves.
To this important legacy of Ibn Hazm and al-Bâjî must be added a sixth-century AH/twelfth-century dialogue between Ibn 'Abduzzamad al-Qurzubî and scholars in Toledo, and the dispute that took place in the city of Murcia between the historian and man of letters Ibn Râshiq al-Mursî and an Arabist Dominican, Raymond Marti.
www.unesco.org /culture/al-andalus/html_eng/benchrifa.shtml   (1322 words)

  
 Islamic Spain: Islamic Origins
The traditional story is that in 711, a Christian chief, Julian, went to Musa ibn Nusair, the governor of North Africa.
Musa then responded by sending his young general, Tariq ibn Ziad, with a force of over 7000 troops.
After this first victory, Tariq ibn Ziad conqured the most of Spain and Portugal with little difficulty and minimal resistance.
projects.pisd.edu /webmastering/williams/Islam_Spain/page2.htm   (231 words)

  
 ZAWAJ.COM: Ramadan and Eid Articles, Resources and Links
In the first year after the Hijrah, the Prophet (peace and blessings be upon him) sent Hamzah ibn Abdul Muttalib with thirty Muslim riders to Saif al Bahr to investigate three hundred riders from Quraish who had camped auspiciously in that area.
In 6 A.H., Zaid ibn Haritha was sent to Wadi al-Qura at the head of a detachment to confront Fatimah bint Rabiah, the queen of that area.
Ninety-two years after the Hijrah and in Ramadhan, Musa ibn Nusair the Umayyad governor of North Africa, and his courageous general Tariq ibn Ziyad succeeded in liberating whole of Spain, Sicily and part of France, beginning the Golden Age of Al-Andalus where Muslims ruled for over 700 years.
www.zawaj.com /events/ramadhan/ramadhan_victory.html   (1348 words)

  
 Israpundit: Waqf al-Andalus
Patrick D. O'Brien In 711 CE, the Umayyad Caliph al-Walid gave permission to the Arab governer of North Africa, Musa ibn Nusair, to attack Spain, which was seen as a prime target for jihad.
In 711 CE, the Umayyad Caliph al-Walid gave permission to the Arab governer of North Africa, Musa ibn Nusair, to attack Spain, which was seen as a prime target for jihad.
Musa decided to send the great Berber warrior general, Tariq ibn Ziyad, leading a force of approximately 12,000 Berber and Arab soldiers to take Spain in the holy conquest of Qur'an and sword.
www.israpundit.com /archives/2005/03/waqf_alandalus.php   (2493 words)

  
 ::. ymouk.com
In 6 A.H., Zaid ibn Haritha was sent to Wadi al-Qura at the head of a detachment to confront Fatimah bint Rabiah, the queen of that area.
Musa ibn Nusair, the Umayyad governor of North Africa, responded by sending his courageous general Tariq ibn Ziyad at the head of 12,000 Berber and Arab troops.
In Ramadan of that year, they were confronted with a combined Visigoth army of 90,000 Christians led by Roderic himself, who was seated on a throne of ivory, silver, and precious gems and drawn by white mules.
www.ymouk.com /0501/articles/archive/plain/RamadaninHistory.htm   (1476 words)

  
 RedWEB.org - Good News for Spain!   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
In 711 Tariq ibn Ziyad, a Berber governor of Tangier, crossed into Spain with an army of 12,000.
But a year later, in 712, Musa ibn Nusair, the Muslim governor in North Africa, returned with the best of his Arab troops.
The royal vizier, Ibn Abi Amir (aka as Al Mansur), became regent (981-1002) and established himself as virtual dictator.
www.redweb.org /history/moors.htm   (935 words)

  
 Untitled Document
The Muslim army was 12,000 strong and led by Tariq ibn Ziyad, the governor of Tangier.
The first real occupation of the country came in the next yearin 712 CE when the Musa ibn Nusair the governor North Africa marched on Spain with his best soldiers and was "intent" on staying this time around.
It is said that "In three years he had subdued all but the mountainous region in the extreme north and had initiated forays into France, which were stemmed at Poitiers in 732" ().This was the beginning of the true Moorish occupation of al-Andalus.
www.mmu.k12.vt.us /teachers/brewer/zjproject/editorial.htm   (556 words)

  
 BBC - Religion & Ethics - Islamic Spain   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
The traditional story is that in the year 711, an oppressed Christian chief, Julian, went to Musa ibn Nusair, the governor of North Africa, with a plea for help against the tyrannical Visigoth ruler of Spain, Roderick.
Musa responded by sending the young general Tariq bin Ziyad with an army of 7000 troops.
The name Gibraltar is derived from Jabal At-Tariq which is Arabic for 'Rock of Tariq' named after the place where the Muslim army landed.
www.bbc.co.uk /religion/religions/islam/history/spain/spain2.shtml   (266 words)

  
 Quaest.io on Tariq Ibn Ziyad
Tariq ibn Ziyad or Taric bin Zeyad (d.
He was initially the deputy of Musa ibn Nusair in North Africa, and was sent by his superior to launch the first thrust of an invasion of the Iberian peninsula.
Some claim that he was invited to intervene by the heirs of the Visigothic King, Wittiza, in the Visigothic civil war.
www.quaest.io /?title=tariq-ibn-ziyad   (913 words)

  
 Fall Semester: Supply-Side University Economics Lesson #9 -- November 19, 1999
The concept of sovereignty and kingship was boiled down to such simple terms that we are able to grasp their essential elements in new and insightful ways.
The Berber inhabitants of these lands being grouped in well-knit tribes, the first conquests effected by Ibn Abi Sarh over them and the Franks were of no avail; for they repeatedly rose in revolt and recanted the Muslim faith, killing large numbers of Muslims.
Next week, the third and concluding part of this series by Ibn Khaldun, a man who might be considered on any list of the ten most important thinkers of the second millennium, except for the fact that the people who draw up these lists are not familiar with Islamic philosophers.
www.polyconomics.com /searchbase/11-19-99.html   (3047 words)

  
 Islamica Community Forums - Al-Andalus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
Julian took reports of the lush paradise of Spain to Musa ibn Nusair, who was the governor of North Africa at the time.
Musa was a brilliant general that had defeated Julian and taken over Tangiers for the Muslim Caliphate of Damascus, which was then led by Caliph Walid.
On the edge of the headstone, his death information is inscribed in Arabic stating what year “Mikayil ibn Semeno” was “taken forth by Allah’s mercy from this life to the life to come” and a supplication that stated, “may Allah give light to him”(Fletcher 140).
www.islamicaweb.com /archive/t-6975   (3154 words)

  
 Portugal Muslim Domination
In 711 Iberia was invaded by a Muslim army commanded by Tariq ibn Ziyad.
In the spring of 714, a Muslim army commanded by Musa ibn Nusair marched to Saragossa and then to León and Astorga.
These internecine struggles provided an opportunity for small groups of Visigothic Christians, who had taken refuge in the mountainous northwest of the peninsula, to go on the offensive against the Muslims, thus beginning the Christian reconquest of Iberia.
www.country-studies.com /portugal/muslim-domination.html   (408 words)

  
 A Brief History of al-Andalus   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-27)
By 682 Musa ibn Nusair had defeated the Byzantines at Kairouan in what is now Morocco.
Julian was eager to attack the Visigoths, as his daughter had been raped by Roderick, but Musa was hesitant to go on a Spanish adventure.
The real ruler was Ibn abi Amir, a great general known as al-Mansur, The Victorious, who continued to lead al-Andalus with military might.
home.earthlink.net /~lilinah/Library/HistoryAndalus.html   (4527 words)

  
 Weapons and Tactics
The next year 7,000 men under the command of Tariq ibn Ziyad landed at Gibraltar, in 712 AD Musa ibn Nusair assumed the command of the Muslim force, he conquered the whole of Spain and began raiding across the Pyrenes but was recalled by the Caliph in Damascus.
Hurr, who succeeded Musa, sent plundering expeditions across the Pyrenes into Aquitine, in 719 Narbonne was occupied but when Toulouse was besieged by the Muslims they were defeated by Eudo.
Salahuddin (Salah-ad-din Yusuf ibn Ayyub) a Kurdish officer in the service of the Amir of Syria was confirmed to the titles of sultan of Egypt and Syria in 1174 AD by the Caliph in Baghdad.
www.defencejournal.com /2001/feb/weapons.htm   (5829 words)

  
 Ramadhan in History
In the 6th year A.H., Zaid ibn Haritha was sent to Wadi Al Qura at the head of a detachment to confront Fatimah bint Rabiah, the queen of this area.
Musa ibn Nusair, the governor of North Africa responded sending his courageous general Tariq ibn Ziyad at the head of 12,000 Berber and Arab troops.
In Ramadan of that year, they were confronted with a combined Visigoth army of 90,000 Christians led by Roderic himself, seated on a throne of ivory, silver and precious gems and drawn by white mules.
www.netcomuk.co.uk /~magamiet/More_khutbahs/Dr_A_H_Quick/ramadhan_in_history.htm   (1402 words)

  
 search.com - Abdul Rahman Al Ghafiqi
After Al Samh ibn Malik was killed at the Battle of Toulouse in 721 (102 A.H.) by the forces of Duke Odo of Aquitaine, Abdul Rahman took over the command of Eastern Andalus.
He was briefly relieved of his command, when 'Anbasa ibn Suhaim Al Kalbi was appointed in 721 (103 A.H.).
In 730 (112 A.H.) the Caliph Hisham ibn Abd al-Malik appointed Abdul Rahman as governor/commander of Al Andalus.
domainhelp.search.com /reference/Abdul_Rahman_Al_Ghafiqi   (423 words)

  
 SSU Lesson #10: Ibn Khaldun, Part II (Sovereignty and Kingship) [Free Republic]
The first of three guest lectures (March 23) from the 14th century Arab historiographer, Ibn Khaldun discussed the origins of society and how bonds of solidarity formed to produce nations and states.
An Arab Philosophy of History: Selections from the Prolegomena (Muqadimmah) of Ibn Khaldun of Tunis (1332-1406), edited by Charles Issawi.
Certainly the major lesson of Ibn Khaldun is suggested by your final excerpts: that nations inevitably grow soft and decadent, because over a few generations success breeds softness and complacency.
www.freerepublic.com /forum/a3ac4cb4243a9.htm   (2911 words)

  
 Virtual Tangier: Ibn Abd-El-Hakem
Musa Ibn Nusair sent his son Merwan to Tangier, to wage a holy war upon her coast.
Having, then, exerted himself together with his friends, he returned, leaving to Tarik Ibn Amru the command of his army which amounted to 1,700.
It is also said that Musa Ibn Nusair marched out of Ifrikiya [Africa] upon an expedition into Tangier, and that he was the first governor who entered Tangier, where parts of the Berber tribes Botir and Beranes resided.
home.att.net /~VTangier/Pages/Hakem.htm   (694 words)

  
 Spain - AL ANDALUS
The people who became known to West Europeans as Moors were the Arabs, who had swept across North Africa from their Middle Eastern homeland, and the Berbers, inhabitants of Morocco who had been conquered by the Arabs and converted to Islam.
In 711 Tariq ibn Ziyad, a Berber governor of Tangier, crossed into Spain with an army of 12,000 (landing at a promontory that was later named, in his honor, Jabal Tariq, or Mount Tariq, from which the name, Gibraltar, is derived).
Tariq returned to Morocco, but the next year (712) Musa ibn Nusair, the Muslim governor in North Africa, led the best of his Arab troops to Spain with the intention of staying.
countrystudies.us /spain/5.htm   (854 words)

  
 Abd ar-Rahman I
In the summer of 710, a small force of 7000-strong men under the command of Tariq ibn Ziyad landed to the west of Gibraltar.
When news arrived to Damascus of Tariq's success, Musa ibn Nusair was quick to come to the aid of Tariq when he crossed the straits with an army of 18,000 men.
His ambition to share some prominence as well as fighting for the Islamic cause, quickly saw the conquering of other neighbouring towns and cities, but his advance was soon halted to the extreme North where he was defeated at the battle of Poitiers by the French.
www.idir.net /~suede/successor1.html   (633 words)

  
 Wanniski.com
Re: Ibn Khaldun Part II Last week we had the first of three guest lectures from the 14th century Arab historiographer, Ibn Khaldun, who discussed the origins of society and how bonds of solidarity formed to produce nations and states.
The concept of sovereignty and kingship was boiled down to such simple terms that we are able to grasp their essential elements in new and insightful ways.
The Berber inhabitants of these lands being grouped in well-knit tribes, the first conquests effected by Ibn Abi Sarh over them and the Franks were of no avail; for they repeatedly rose in revolt and recanted the Muslim faith, killing large numbers of Muslims.
www.wanniski.com /showarticle.asp?articleid=4784   (3022 words)

  
 : : [ University of Leicester Islamic Society ] : : : : : : : :
The original architect was Ahmad ibn Baso, who is thought to be responsible for similar towers in Marrakech and Rabat.
The Minaret took ibn Baso twelve years to build and reportedly has 35 gentle slopes leading to the top.
Ibn Shaprut was the physician-cum-diplomat who negotiated a treaty with Queen Toda of Navarre.
www.leicesterisoc.org /ARTICLES/muslimspain/muslimspain.htm   (4721 words)

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