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Topic: Muscovite Russia


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  Muscovy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
By assuming that title, the Muscovite prince underscored that he was a major ruler or emperor on a par with the Greek emperor or the Mongol khan.
Russia was in chaos for more than a decade, but the institution of the autocracy remained intact.
Fortunately for Russia, its major enemies, Poland and Sweden, were engaged in a bitter conflict with each other, which provided Russia the opportunity to make peace with Sweden in 1617 and to sign a truce with Poland in 1619.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Muscovy   (3692 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Battle of Orsha   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
B br (Czech Bobr) is a river in the northern Czech Republic and southwestern Poland, a tributary of the Oder River, with a length of 272 kilometres (2 in Czech Republic, 270 in Poland, 10th longest Polish river) and the basin area of 5,876 sq.
Upset at word of the massive defeat, Muscovite Grand Prince Vasili III allegedly remarked that "the prisoners [were] as useful as the dead" and declined to negotiate their return.
Imperial Russia is the term used to cover the period of Russian history from the expansion of Russia under Peter the Great, through the expansion of the Russian Empire from the Baltic to the Pacific Ocean, to the deposal of Nicholas II of Russia, the last tsar, at the start...
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Battle-of-Orsha   (4077 words)

  
 Muscovite Russia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
This period in the historyof Russia is assumed to be from the beginning of the 14th century to the beginning of the 18th century.
Byassuming that title, the Muscovite prince underscored that he was a major ruler or emperor on a par with the emperor of theByzantine Empire or the Mongol khan.
Fortunately for Russia, its major enemies, Poland and Sweden, wereengaged in a bitter conflict with each other, which provided Russia the opportunity to make peace with Sweden in 1617 and to sign a truce with Poland in 1619.
www.therfcc.org /muscovite-russia-105429.html   (3332 words)

  
 muscovite - Hutchinson encyclopedia article about muscovite
Muscovite is a metamorphic mineral occurring mainly in schists; it is also found in some granites, and appears as shiny flakes on bedding planes of some sandstones.
The terror-stricken Muscovite scurried like a hunted rabbit through the hole that still gaped in the boma's wall at the point where his own prey had escaped, and as Tarzan approached the camp upon the opposite side Rokoff disappeared into the jungle in the wake of Jane Clayton.
In short, he told us there was a great caravan of Muscovite and Polish merchants in the city, preparing to set out on their journey by land to Muscovy, within four or five weeks; and he was sure we would take the opportunity to go with them, and leave him behind, to go back alone.
encyclopedia.farlex.com /muscovite   (266 words)

  
 Muscovy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
It included a civil war in which a struggle over the throne was complicated by the machinations of rival boyar factions, the intervention of regional powers Poland (Dimitriads wars) and Sweden, and intense popular discontent.
Kiev was a major transmitter of new ideas and insight through the famed scholarly academy that founded there in 1631.
Among the results of this infusion of ideas into Russia were baroque styles of architecture, literature, and.
www.bucyrus.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Muscovy   (3655 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Russia
The boundaries of Russia are: on the north, the Arctic Ocean; on the west, Sweden, Norway, the Baltic Sea, Germany, Austria-Hungary, and Rumania; on the south, the Black Sea, Turkey, Persia, the Caspian Sea; Afghanistan, and China; on the east, the Pacific Ocean.
The greatest increase in the population is given by the region of New Russia, that of the Baltic, and the Province of Moscow.
Under Basil Ivanovitch (1505-33), Muscovite Russia grew by the annexation of the Republic of Pskof, the Principalities of Ryazan and Novgorod-Seversk, and the Territory of Smolensk.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/13231c.htm   (19454 words)

  
 Muscovite   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
Muscovite also known as potash mica is an orthosilicate mineral of aluminium and potassium.
Muscovite is the most common mica found granites pegmatites gneisses and schists and as a contact metamorphic rock or as a secondary mineral resulting from the alteration of topaz feldspar kyanite etc. In pegmatites it is often in immense sheets which are commercially valuable.
The Muscovites in California, or Rather, Demonstration of the Passage from North America: Discovered by the Russians and of the Ancient One of the Peo...
www.freeglossary.com /Muscovite   (273 words)

  
 ERP History
At the Council of Florence, the Greek "metropolitan of Kiev and all Russia," Isidore, was one of the major architects of the Union.
Muscovite Russia, meanwhile, had acquired the consciousness of being the last bulwark of true Orthodoxy.
The atmosphere of secularistic officialdom that prevailed in Russia was not favourable for a revival of monasticism, but such a revival did take place through the efforts of a young Kievan scholar, Paissy Velichkovsky (1722-94), who became the abbot of the monastery of Neamts in Romania.
www.kosovo.com /history5.html   (1331 words)

  
 Tsar. Who is Tsar? What is Tsar? Where is Tsar? Definition of Tsar. Meaning of Tsar.
Tsar (Russian царь;, from Latin Caesar, cognate with German Kaiser; also spelt Czar in English borrowed from Hungarian) was the title used for the rulers of Russia from 1546 to 1917 (the Imperial Russia).
It was adopted by Ivan IV as symbolic of a change in the nature of the Russian monarchy.
The spelling czar originated with the Austrian diplomat Baron Sigismund von Herberstein, whose Rerum Moscoviticarum Commentarii (1549) (literally Notes on Muscovite Affairs) was the main source of knowledge of Russia in early modern western Europe.
www.knowledgerush.com /kr/encyclopedia/Tsar   (691 words)

  
 Moscow - Open Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
It was the capital of the former Soviet Union, and of Muscovite Russia, the pre-Imperial Russia.
By 1304 Yury of Moscow contested with Mikhail of Tver for the throne of the principality of Vladimir.
In 1480, Ivan III is said to have finally broken the Russias free from Tatar control (see Great standing on the Ugra river) and Moscow became the capital of an empire which would eventually encompass all of Russia and Siberia, and parts of many other lands.
open-encyclopedia.com /Moscow   (2098 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Muscovite Russia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
This period in the history of Russia is assumed to be from the beginning of the 14th century to the beginning of the 18th century.
In 1654 the Ukrainian leader, Bogdan Khmelnitskiy, offered to place Ukraine under the protection of the Muscovite tsar, Aleksey I.
The Treaty of Andrusovo, which ended the war in 1667, split Ukraine along the Dniepr River, reuniting the western sector with Poland and leaving the eastern sector self-governing under the suzerainty of the tsar.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Muscovite-Russia   (3640 words)

  
 Muscovy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
The reign of the tsars started officially with Ivan the Terrible, the first monarch to be crowned Tsar of Russia, but in practice it started with the first to use the title of tsar, Ivan III of Russia (Ivan the Great), who expanded Muscovy (it is considered as reunification of Russian lands).
By assuming that title, the Muscovite prince underscored that he was a major ruler or emperor on a par with the emperor of the Byzantine Empire or the Mongol khan.
Among the results of this infusion of ideas into Russia were baroque architecture, literature, and icon painting.
www.worldhistory.com /wiki/M/Muscovy.htm   (3645 words)

  
 Pinsk
In 1648, on the eve of the war with Muscovite Russia, Pinsk was occupied by Ukrainian Cossack army under commander Niababy and could only be reconquered with great difficulty by prince Janus Radzivil, a high-ranking commander in the GDL army.
Thus the Muscovite Tsar Alexej, who wanted to be the only ruler of all Eastern Slavic peoples, took revenge on the GDL, and the Muscovite Orthodox Church had an opportunity to assert itself as the only successor of Constantinople, which had been taken by the Turks in 1453.
In reality Muscovite Russia was pursuing its usual policy of conquest, whereby not only the culture, but all national particularities of the Belarusans were meant to be systematically destroyed, so that it would afterwards be easier to declare them part of the "single Russian people".
www.belarusguide.com /cities/pinsk.html   (1169 words)

  
 World Wide Web Virtual Library - Russian History Index - Chronological
The site is divided in 3 sections: General History of Russia from the ancient times to the mid-90th of XX century, (electronic version of lectures by academician B.V. Lichman (University of Ekaterinburg), The History of the Railway Transport in Russia and The Histoty of the Economic Thought in Russia.
Letters from Russia - 1856: Excerpts and illustrations from the book of the same title, which features a series of detailed letters from a British eyewitness to the coronation of Tsar Alexander II of Russia at the Kremlin in Moscow.
Russia in the Age of Enlightenment: Discussion on the developments in Russian history during this era.
vlib.iue.it /hist-russia/chronological.html   (1328 words)

  
 The Infography about the History of Muscovite Russia
Grigorii Karpovich Kotoshikhin, On Russia in the Reign of Alexis Mikhailovich: An Annotated Translation.
Lord and Peasant in Russia from the Ninth to the Nineteenth Century.
Russia and the Golden Horde: The Mongol Impact on Medieval Russian History.
www.infography.com /content/214687512356.html   (503 words)

  
 PAPER RU 4: MUSCOVITE RUSSIA
Muscovy is the name commonly given to Russia in the period when the foundations of its multinational empire were laid.
By the middle of the seventeenth century Russia was a powerful empire ruled from Moscow, an empire whose land mass was greater than that of any contemporary state.
This paper traces the political and cultural evolution of Russia in the intervening centuries.
www.cus.cam.ac.uk /~jrh11/RU4New.html   (230 words)

  
 Page 3 / History / Petersburg CITY / Official guide to St. Petersburg
When in the 16th century Novgorod was subdued by Moscow, the lands along the Neva River became part of the centralized Russian state, Muscovite Russia.
However, at the beginning of the 17th century serious unrest started in Russia, after the last tsar of the Ryurik dynasty, Feodor Ioannovich (the son of Ivan the Terrible), had died leaving no heirs to the throne.
A new border between Russia and Sweden was set by the Stolbovo Treaty of 1617.
www.petersburgcity.com /city/history/page3   (260 words)

  
 The Romanovs: A Royal Family
Challenging traditional interpretations of the roles of royal women in patriarchal Muscovite society, Between God and Tsar opens a new approach to understanding medieval Russia.
This pioneering study demonstrates that the wives of the early tsars played complex roles in government, especially during times of crisis, and shows how religious culture perpetuated the expressions of their legitimacy as female rulers.
Muscovite Russia's values were sanctioned by religion, and it is through religious images that the royal women's claims to rulership can be seen most clearly.
www.angelfire.com /biz5/romanovs/god.html   (306 words)

  
 HSTAM443 book review
The highest circle of the Muscovite elite in a period when their fortunes changed.
Lindsey Hughes, Sophia, Regent of Russia, 1657-1704 (1990) DK125.H84.1990.
Philip Longworth, Alexis, Tsar of All the Russias (1984) DK118.L66.1984.
faculty.washington.edu /dwaugh/hstam443/443bkrev.html   (2021 words)

  
 Pinsk   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
In 1648 on the eve of the war with Muscovite Russia Pinsk was occupied by Ukrainian Cossack army under commander Niababy and could only be reconquered with great difficulty by prince Janus Radziwill.
During the war between Moscow and the Great Dutchy of Lithuania which raged between 1654-1667 the city suffered heavily from the attacks of the Muscovite army under its commander Valkonski and its allied army of Ukrainian Cossacks.
Thus the Muscovite Tsar Alexej who wanted to be the only ruler of all Eastern Slavic peoples, took revenge on the Great Dutchy of Lithuania and the Muscovite Orthodox Church had an opportunity to assert itself as the only successor of Constantinople, which had been taken by the Turks in 1453.
www.kresy.co.uk /pinsk.html   (402 words)

  
 Saint Petersburg, Russia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
Peter the Great was crowned Tzar of Russia at the age of 10 on April 27, 1682, and became Emperor of Russia on October 22, 1721.
The City was built with 18th and 19th century European pomp and orderliness by mainly European architects and accumulated all of the grandeur of the Russian Imperial Court.
The present City is a large industrial, transport, scientific and cultural center of Russia with a territory of 620 square kilometers (235 square miles) and a population of 5 million.
www.basecamp.cnchost.com /peterbrg.htm   (1697 words)

  
 Definition of Muscovy
5:...II of Russia]] (''Ivan the Great''), who expanded Muscovy (it is considered as reunification of Russian lan...
In [[1532]], [[Vasili III of Russia]] ousted Kaz...
his claim to the Muscovite throne and return the Muscovy royal insignia.
www.wordiq.com /dictionary/Muscovy.html   (508 words)

  
 Russia Engages the World - NYPL
By the mid-17th century, the Romanov rulers of Muscovite Russia began to adopt practices from beyond their borders.
Over time, Muscovite Russia had expanded beyond its base west of the Ural Mountains to become a Eurasian state.
Scattered tribes mounted resistance but ultimately succumbed to Muscovite Russia's expansionist drive, which brought the realm into contact with Asian realms such as the China of the Qing emperors and, to a much more limited extent, Tokugawa Japan.
russia.nypl.org /level2.html   (203 words)

  
 Women in Medieval Russia Bibliography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
He wonders if there are any works that describe their rights in area such as owning property, choosing husbands, or gaining a divorce.
If any of you have any information on women in Russia in this time or know of any sources he can go to, please post a reply to this list and I will forward it to him.
Isole Thyret, "'Blessed Is the Tsaritsa's Womb': The Myth of Miraculous Birth and Royal Motherhood in Muscovite Russia," Russian Review, October 1994.
www.h-net.msu.edu /~women/bibs/bibl-medrussia.html   (410 words)

  
 Russia Engages the World - NYPL
The items in this section reflect the isolation that prevailed in Muscovite Russia until the mid-17th century.
Russia seu Moscovia itemque Tartaria [Russia or Muscovy, and the Tatar Territories]
The following reproduced maps, indicative of the knowledge gained by both Russia and Europe as a result of their increased interaction beginning in the mid-17th century, underscore Russia's transformation from an isolated, Orthodox tsardom into a modern, global empire.
russia.nypl.org /checklist.html   (836 words)

  
 Russian Culture
Pictures of Russia under Tsar Mikhail by later artists (in Russian)
Pictures of Russia under Tsar Aleksei by later artists (in Russian)
Return to Russia of the Icon of the Mother of God of Kazan
www.und.nodak.edu /dept/lang/russian/162/culture.html   (124 words)

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