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Topic: Musonius Rufus


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In the News (Tue 20 Aug 19)

  
  On Musonius Rufus: a Brief Essay
Gaius Musonius Rufus was a Roman knight of Italian (Etruscan) birth, but dedicated his life to Stoicism and to preaching moral lectures in Greek and teaching all over the Empire, as well as involving himself in moral causes even at peril of his life.
Musonius was also renowned for risking death in trying to stop the civil war of 69 A.D. by preaching peace to the armies that were about to meet on the battlefield [2].
The Musonius version appears in the context of Discourse 15, where he argues, almost alone among Romans, that "every child born should be raised," attacking the common practice of exposure, i.e.
www.infidels.org /library/modern/richard_carrier/musonius.html   (1680 words)

  
 Musonius Rufus on the Chief End of Marriage   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
C. Musonius Rufus was a Roman eques and Stoic philosopher, born about 30 C.E. Many leading Roman citizens studied philosophy with him, and he also taught the ex-slave philosopher Epictetus.
The husband and wife, he [Musonius] used to say, should come together for the purpose of making a life in common and of procreating children, and furthermore of regarding all things in common between them, and nothing peculiar or private to one or the other, not even their own bodies.
The birth of a human being which results from such a union is to be sure something marvelous, but it is not yet enough for the relation of husband and wife, inasmuch as quite apart from marriage it could result from any other sexual union, just as in the case of animals.
www.coh.arizona.edu /classics/inst/clas362/musonius.htm   (230 words)

  
 ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY: The Ethical Period
Musonius Rufus was a Roman philosopher born in Etruria.
Musonius fell under the ban of Nero owing to his ethical teachings, and was exiled to the island of Gyarus on a trumped-up charge of participation in Piso's conspiracy.
Musonius argues that philosophy is not only a matter of knowledge but also of practice, done in obedience to the call of God.
radicalacademy.com /adiphilethical2.htm   (3216 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Musonius, like a number of other followers of Greek philosophy in the Rome of his day, was a native Roman, but both taught and wrote in Greek (as did the 2nd century CE Emperor, Marcus Aurelius).
Musonius immediately goes on to state the view that sexual virtue consists in only indulging in sexual activity for the purpose of begetting children, even in marriage, and that no extramarital sexual relations are legitimate, even with one's slaves or prostitutes (not the usual view in his day, at least for men).
Musonius permits trimming hair and beard, but not shaving any of it: he is addressing men, but presumably the same rules would apply to hair, including body-hair, of either sex.
userwww.service.emory.edu /~philsks/Musonius.html   (508 words)

  
 V. Epictetus. 1909-14. The Golden Sayings of Epictetus. The Harvard Classics   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Rufus 1 used to say, If you have leisure to praise me, what I say is naught.
In truth he spoke in such wise, that each of us who sat there, thought that some one had accused him to Rufus:—so surely did he lay his finger on the very deeds we did: so surely display the faults of each before his very eyes.
C. Musonius Rufus, a Stoic philosopher, whose lectures Epictetus had attended.
www.bonus.com /contour/bartlettqu/http@@/www.bartleby.com/2/2/5.html   (118 words)

  
 Questions for Musonius Rufus Discussion   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Musonius believes in absolute monogamy for both partners: the man should not regard his body as private to himself but rather as shared with his wife.
Musonius also believes that children in themselves are not enough to unite husband and wife; what sets marriage apart from any other form of sexual union is mutual love.
Musonius, in contrast, argues that fides and concordia can only spring from a total merging of interests, both domestic and public.
www.coh.arizona.edu /classics/inst/clas362/questions.htm   (328 words)

  
 Stoic News
"Musonius advanced the distinctive view that the natural function of sexual activity is only to produce offspring; hence all other sexual relations, heterosexual or homosexual, are improper and reveal a lack of self-control.
The goal of marriage is the rearing of many children (abortion and exposure of infants being contrary to nature) and the cultivation of companionship between spouses, which is both a a symbol of and the foundation for social relations generally.
615) says that Musonius wrote nothing, that accounts of his lectures were published after his death, and that only extracts of twenty-one of the accounts survive.
stoicnews.blogspot.com /2003/08/cbb-charles-brice-broadway-just.html   (417 words)

  
 PTypes - Musonius Rufus: "On Sexual Indulgence"
Musonius advanced the distinctive view that the natural function of sexual activity is only to produce offspring; hence all other relations, heterosexual or homosexual, are improper and reveal a lack of self-control.
His central theme is the importance of self-control in the service of a rationally articulated understanding of human nature.
Men who are not wantons or immoral are bound to consider sexual intercourse justified only when it occurs in marriage and is indulged in for the purpose of begetting children, since that is lawful, but unjust and unlawful when it is mere pleasure-seeking, even in marriage.
www.ptypes.com /musonius_on_sex.html   (572 words)

  
 PTypes - Musonius Rufus: "Will the philosopher prosecute anyone for personal injury?"
Here is Musonius Rufus' Discourse X: "Will the philosopher prosecute anyone for personal injury?" (trans.
He said that he himself would never prosecute anyone for personal injury nor recommend it to anyone else who claimed to be a philosopher.
To be sure he says that a good man can never be wronged by a bad man; but nevertheless he draws up an indictment as having been wronged by bad men, while claiming to be accounted a good man himself.
www.ptypes.com /musonius_on_injuries.html   (633 words)

  
 RUFUS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Search the RUFUS Family Message Boards at Ancestry.com (if available).
Search the RUFUS Family Resource Center at RootsWeb.com (if available).
Find graves of people named RUFUS at Find-a-Grave.com (or add one that you know).
www.worldhistory.com /surname/US/R/RUFUS.htm   (73 words)

  
 [Corpus-Paul] A NEW THREAD!!! Paul and ancient literature on leadership
The whole issue of leadership was very topical in the first couple of centuries of the imperial period, but written versions of such discussions tend to come a bit later.
For example, in the first century you have the likes of Musonius Rufus, who is reputed to have been very well respected and influential (the 'Roman Socrates'), but we are dependant on student's classroom lecture notes (in effect), and on fragments gathered in various citations elsewhere for his teachings.
Likewise with Epictetus, much influenced by Musonius Rufus, and also apparently highly esteemed as a teacher and mentor to many pupils who went on to exercise significant forms of public office and leadership.
lists.ibiblio.org /pipermail/corpus-paul/20051005/005537.html   (527 words)

  
 Humility & status conventions
My = focus alongside Paul is on stoicism of the early imperial period: = especially Musonius Rufus, Epictetus and to a lesser extent, Dio = Chysostom.=20 My basic thesis is that humility (and similar terms) has been = domesticated in Christian thought, considered little more than 'being = nice' and not getting too arrogant.
Whilst stoic teaching similarly = condemned undue pride and arrogance, Pauline instruction on humility = (esp. Philippians 2) was much more radical, even subversive, in much the = same way as the cruciform shape given to perceptions of strength and = weakness, honour and shame.
My focus alongside Paul is on stoicism of the = early=20 imperial period: especially Musonius Rufus, Epictetus and to a lesser = extent,=20 Dio Chysostom.
lists.ibiblio.org /pipermail/corpus-paul/20010629/002697.html   (674 words)

  
 Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2004.06.15
Among the various works attributed to him, the only one to survive intact is the Compendium of Greek Theology, though its name, much like its author's, fluctuates in the manuscripts, and the attribution has only recently achieved something approaching consensus.
In recent years interest in Cornutus has experienced a very modest upsurge, not least because of growing interest in the ancient theory and practice of allegory, yet the two best starting points have remained the relatively brief articles by Nock and Most.
The Saggio Introduttivo, entitled "Anneo Cornuto Neo-Stoico ed Esegeta del Mito Greco su Base Etimologico-Allegorica," provides an overview of all that is known (and not known) about Cornutus' life and work and an evaluation of their sources, most notably Persius' Fifth Satire.
ccat.sas.upenn.edu /bmcr/2004/2004-06-15.html   (1612 words)

  
 WLGR
Although most of same ideas can be found in other pagan writers, they appear to have been expressed by Musonius with great clarity and force.
Perhaps Musonius had in mind Odysseus' characterisation of an ideal marriage, 'May the gods grant your heart's desire, a husband and household, and may they grant that you are of one mind.
For there is nothing stronger or better than when a husband and wife are of one mind and share a household.
www.stoa.org /diotima/anthology/wlgr/wlgr-philosophers.shtml   (1802 words)

  
 Ancient History Sourcebook: George Long: Philosophy Of Antoninus
There were even then noble minds that could dare and endure, sustained by a good conscience and an elevated idea of the purposes of man's existence.
Epictetus, a Phrygian Greek, was brought to Rome, we know not how, but he was there the slave and afterwards the freedman of an unworthy master, Epaphroditus by name, himself a freeman and a favourite of Nero.
Epictetus may have been a hearer of C. Musonius Rufus, while he was still a slave, but he could hardly have been a teacher before he was made free.
www.cartage.org.lb /en/themes/BookLibrary/books/bibliographie/L/GeorgeLong/long-anton.html   (7423 words)

  
 Tacitean Irony/Stoic Suicide
He was a pupil of the Etruscan stoic Musonius Rufus whom Nero exiled in 65 and who may have counciled Rubellius Plautus toward an "imperturbable expectation of death [Annals XIV.57]."
Exiled in 65: Dec. Novius Priscus (because friend of Seneca), Verginus Flavus and Musonius Rufus (as "professors of rhetoric and philosophy").
Intervening events: Silanus Torquatus II (first exiled, he fights when presented with the order to die, falling "wounded in front, as in battle"), Antistius Vetus - father-in-law of Rubellius Platus, his mother-in-law Sextia and his daughter Antista Pollitta (group suicide).
academic.reed.edu /Humanities/Hum110/lecture_handouts/98-99/LectureHandout022699.html   (1013 words)

  
 Women in Roman Philosophy   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Klassen, W. (1984), "Musonius Rufus, Jesus and Paul: three first-century feminists", in P. Richardson and J.C. Hurd (eds), From Jesus to Paul (Waterloo: Wilfrid Laurier U.P.), pp.185-206.
Ward, R.B. (1990), "Musonius and Paul on marriage", New Testament Studies 36, pp.281-289.
Musonius Rufus (1st century AD Stoic): extracts in LandF no.75.
www.lamp.ac.uk /~noy/romanphi.htm   (2280 words)

  
 Musonius Rufus And Education In The Good Life: A Model Of Teaching And Living Virtue
Musonius Rufus And Education In The Good Life: A Model Of Teaching And Living Virtue
First-century Stoic philosopher Musonius Rufus was famous for teaching and living the good life of virtue.
Conclusion Shall we learn from the teaching of Musonius Rufus?
www.booksmatter.com /b0761829024.htm   (215 words)

  
 The Golden Sayings of Epictetus - V
Rufus(2) used to say, If you have leisure to praise me, what I say is naught.
In truth he spoke in such wise, that each of us who sat there, thought that some one had accused him to Rufus:— so surely did he lay his finger on the very deeds we did: so surely display the faults of each before his very eyes.
(2) C. Musonius Rufus, a Stoic philosopher, whose lectures Epictetus had attended.
www.authorama.com /the-golden-sayings-of-epictetus-5.html   (126 words)

  
 Oxford Scholarship Online: Epictetus
He was taught Stoicism by Musonius Rufus, and the salient doctrines of traditional Stoicism are compared with Epictetus' main themes, with a view to assess his originality.
Epictetus plays down Stoic paradoxes and technicalities, focusing instead on moral progress and the fallibility of ordinary persons.
Keywords: Epictetus, ethics, fallibility, moral progress, Musonius Rufus, Stoicism
www.oxfordscholarship.com /oso/public/content/philosophy/0199245568/acprof-0199245568-chapter-2.html   (126 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Books: Epictetus: A Stoic and Socratic Guide to Life   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Marcus Aurelius, Musonius Rufus, Aulus Gellius, Dio Chrysostom, Plato's Socrates, Roman Empire, New Testament, Cynic Diogenes, Plato's Phaedo, Late Stoicism, Unlike Epictetus
There are three types of books : the Great Books, those that distract us from them and those that lead us to them.
A leading proponent of Late Stoicism («the phase of Stoics during the Roman Empire» (19)), converted by his teacher Musonius Rufus, Epictetus may well be the most attractive figure of the movement.
www.amazon.com /exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0199245568?v=glance   (1318 words)

  
 Teaching Preaching: Isaac Rufus Clark and Black Sacred Rhetoric by Katie Geneva Cannon - ISBN 0826414419   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-28)
Teaching Preaching: Isaac Rufus Clark and Black Sacred Rhetoric
The Rhetoric and Ideology of Genre: Strategies for Stability and Change (Research in the Teaching of Rhetoric and Composition)
A Black Educator in the Segregated South: Kentucky's Rufus B. Atwood
www.cheapbooks.info /book_description/0826414419   (230 words)

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