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Topic: Nanshoku


  
  Gay love in Japan - World History of Male Love
Kukai, or as he was known after his death, Kobo Daishi “the great master from Kobo”, was the founder of the Japanese branch of Vajrayana Buddhism, founding the esoteric Shingon school in the year 816 at Mount Koya after his return from China where he received the teachings and transmission from the sixth Patriarch.
Nonetheless legend has it that he learned about the joys of nanshoku in China (universally renowned from ancient times for its rich homoerotic tradition, ranging from imperial favorites at the court to sanctioned boy-marriages for the commoners) and then implanted the practice in Japan upon his return.
The public displays of the fans caused such commotion that laws had to be passed restricting the haircuts and costumes of the actors, so as not to over-inflame the passions of the audience.
www.androphile.org /preview/Culture/Japan/japan.htm   (2500 words)

  
  Books on Japan - Gay and Lesbian Japan :: Japan Visitor
Not only that, but, as it was the basis of the (misogynistic homosocial) warrior milieu, nanshoku was the embodiment of the values of the samurai, those paragons of the clan-based political order that the new regime had legislated against, forbidden to wear swords anymore and forced to cut off their topknots.
Nanshoku, therefore, stood against everything the new order stood for, and references to it began to be rigorously censored by the new government almost as soon as it took power in 1868.
For this reason, and because nanshoku had been such a popular theme in pre-modern literature, any reference to it was seen as automatically harking back to a time that had been officially banished from memory, and thus became an act of virtual ideological treason towards the new social, cultural and political regime.
www.japanvisitor.com /index.php?cID=354&pID=1147&cName=Books&pName=japan-books-gay-lesbian   (2373 words)

  
 Yaoi: Redrawing Male Love
Nanshoku was a sexual style or role adopted by an adult male to describe his conduct, not an identity based on a preference for a same-sex partner.
Nanshoku was prevalent in Buddhist monasteries--attributed to the eighth-century monk said to have introduced Buddhism to Japan, Kūkai--as well as among the samurai (noble) class, crafts and trades people, and in the emerging cities, such as Kyoto and Edo (Tokyo), where it was based in part around the kabuki theater.
Nanshoku faded away with the Japan's adoption of the Germanic psychosexual theories at the dawn of the 20th century, part of the nation's rush toward industrialization after the U.S. pressured it into signing diplomatic and commercial treaties in the 1850s.
www.guidemag.com /temp/yaoi/a/mcharry_yaoi.html   (17065 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Nanshoku
homosexuality through the transition of nanshoku or male love from the heterogeneous spaces...
the 12th century of a rich and explicit nanshoku literature centered in Buddhist monastic...
Meanwhile the Japanese sniggered that the gaijin did not understand nanshoku (man sex).
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=Nanshoku   (323 words)

  
 Androphile Gay History Project: The World History of Male Love
Greece, of course, was no Utopia: prostitution and rape, often attended by slavery, were common.
In Japan,apprentice Samurai paired up with older warriors to be trained in love and war, and even the shogun had - besides his concubines - many boyfriends, their "nanshoku" loves recorded by writers and shunga painters who immortalized "shudo," the Way of the Young.
They likewise immortalized the hard lives of the "tobiko" or fly boys, traveling young kabuki actors who had to labor on stage by day and please their clients in bed by night.
www.androphile.org   (995 words)

  
 [No title]
But as urban life began to grow, nanshoku was popularized through a combination of the kabuki theater and the commercial sex enterprises that cropped up.
Also interesting were all the examples of art depicting nanshoku, some of it quite ribald and most of it graphic.
And as usual, it appears that it was through contact with the West, particularly with Christian missionaries, that the practice of nanshoku was eventually shunned into the crepuscular corners of Japanese culture.
www.kingsnake.com /books/bookdetail.php?ASIN=0520209001   (769 words)

  
 [No title]
One term for this phenomenon of male-male love was nanshoku, a word composed of the character for otoko, male, and the character for iro.
One theory on the emergence of nanshoku among Buddhist monks claims that because monks were often isolated from women in monastic communities, they could not use women as an outlet for their sexual desires and instead turned to boys, namely chigo (boy-acolytes).
(Leupp, 174-178) Because nanshoku was essentially an alternative to female sex for males, the roles in nanshoku were similar to that of heterosexual roles, and were integral in the relationship.
yurizuki.net /nanshoku.doc   (2228 words)

  
 denbushi.net [essay::Sex and Sensuality in the Japan of Ihara Saikaku]
This type of affection was referred to as nanshoku, or "male love," and it contrasted with joshoku, "female love." In Saikaku's day homosexual love among men had none of the stigma attached to it today in Japanese society or that of our own.
Nanshoku existed exclusively between men and boys, and the age of nineteen was the point at which a male would assume the role associated with the former.
Nanshoku Oukagami was made up entirely of the former, however, and some critics argue that it is for this reason that a discernible misogynistic bias exists in many of the stories.
www.denbushi.net /webspace/words/essays/saikaku.html   (1679 words)

  
 Intersections: Review: Cartographies of Desire: Male-Male Sexuality in Japanese Discourse, 1600 - 1950
Shudô (and to an extent, nanshoku) for instance, connoted a 'way' or 'code' that had to be 'mastered' (as with other ways like, bushidô [the way of the warrior] or sadô [the way of tea]), and was based on a rigid set of expectations based on obligation and reciprocity.
The result of this shift was, on the one hand the association of pre-Meiji shudô practices with uncivilized 'barbarism' (behaviour not befitting subjects/citizens of a 'civilized' nation), and the linking of a specific discourse of sexuality (premised on monogamous heterosexual coupling) to the modern Japanese nation-state.
Furthermore, the configuring of sexuality within the framework of these imported systems of medical and legal knowledge, led to the replacement of the pre-Meiji discourses of shudô and nanshoku with dôseiai (literally 'same-sex love', or homosexuality as a category), and, as happened in the West, the birth of the 'deviant homosexual' individual.
wwwsshe.murdoch.edu.au /intersections/issue6/dasgupta_review.html   (1026 words)

  
 Shogun
Samurai were rewarded for their loyalty with land, which was in turn handed down and divided among their sons.
The loyalty that held together this system of government was reinforced by close ties of male love between samurai and their apprentices, and the shoguns as well all took lovers from among the ranks of the samurai, a practice known as shudo, "the way of the young", or nanshoku, "male color".
Three primary bakufu periods are usually identified, each centered around a family which tended to dominate the position of shogun during that regime.
www.guajara.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/s/sh/shogun.html   (854 words)

  
 Nanshoku
The Japanese term nanshoku (男色) is the Japanese reading of the same characters in Chinese, which literally mean "male colours." The character 色 (colour) still has the meaning of sexual pleasure in both China and Japan.
According to Gary Leupp, the ancient Japanese associated nanshoku with China, a country from which borrowed ideas became the basis for much of Japanese high culture, including their writing system (kanji, Chinese characters).
The Japanese nanshoku tradition drew heavily on that of China (see Homosexuality in China), and to a more limited extent, that of Korea.
www.anime.co.za /wiki/Nanshoku   (2184 words)

  
 [No title]
Japanese termed homosexuality as nanshoku which directly was translated in “male color.” The word color implies eroticism no matter in Chinese or in Japanese.
It is said that Kobo-daishi introduced nanshoku after returning form China; nevertheless, Kobo-daishi never referred to this term in any of his books (Homosexuality in Japan, n.d.).
In this case, they would be influenced by nanshoku in the monasteries (Homosexuality and Buddhsim, n.d.).
140.119.186.100 /2003writing/Gay/Dance_Gay.doc   (930 words)

  
 Homosexuality in Japan - Enpsychlopedia
Originally, shudo, wakashudo and nanshoku were the preferred terms.
The Japanese term nanshoku (男色) is the Japanese reading of the same characters in Chinese, which literally mean "male colours." The character 色 still has the meaning of sexual pleasure in both China and Japan.
It was popularly said that Kukai, the founder of the Shingon Buddhist sect, introduced nanshoku into Japan after returning from Tang China in the 9th century.
enpsychlopedia.org /psypsych/Nanshoku   (2578 words)

  
 Once in keeping with some of the best company | The Japan Times Online
When it was discovered what the West thought of the practice, however, nanshoku became the love that no one any more talked about.
This was a neologism, the Japanese equivalent of "homosexuality," another neologism that had recently been constructed in the West.
In some examples, nanshoku still reared a defiant head, but in others it was rigidly repressed.
search.japantimes.co.jp /cgi-bin/fb20070114dr.html   (658 words)

  
 Chapter 5: Making Japanese by Taking off Clothes
He showed no interest in women as a teenager, and the standard explanation is that his mother instilled a dislike of women in the young Iemitsu.
A more reasonable explanation, however, would start with the widespread acceptance of nanshoku (male-male sexual encounters) in the warrior culture, a prominent part of the environment in which Iemitsu grew up.
But he continued to pursue nanshoku vigorously and appears to have had little or no sexual interest in his wife.
www.east-asian-history.net /textbooks/172/Iemitsu.htm   (605 words)

  
 Stories from the Nanshoku Okagami
It is my honor and pleasure to present here three selected tales from the Nanshoku Okagami, "Great Mirror of Male Love", written by Ihara Saikaku and first published in 1687.
If you had never heard of this Edo Period Japanese classic before it was referenced in Samurai Champloo (I certainly hadn't), you have no idea what remarkable stuff this is. Please don't expect some sort of gay porn: nothing could be further from the truth.
When you read them (and I hope you do), imagine young Isaac--growing up in a country where the punishment for a man caught with a male lover was to watch your partner being executed before dying yourself--and think how he must have felt to realize that a life like the one depicted here existed.
www.spookhouse.net /angelynx/comics/nanshoku-stories-intro.html   (205 words)

  
 Male Colors
Unfettered by the moral opporbium that constrained--or concealed--male-male eroticism in Europe, male colors flew brightly in the public culture of urban Japan.
Gary Leupp explores the practices and the cultural celebration of the Edo-era nanshoku tradition in this exuberant, sensitive, and yet dispassionate social and cultural history of male homoeroticism, the best modern scholarly study in English to date.
Leupp ranges widely in a vast array of original literary, dramatic, and visual sources, which he brings to life with a finely textured use of comparative material from other traditions of male-male love both in East Asia and across the premodern world.
www.ucpress.edu /books/pages/6442.html   (565 words)

  
 Book Information: Great Mirror of Male Love, the :: Internet Book List :: A database of book information and reviews
The first complete translation of Nanshoku okagami by Ihara Saikaku, this is a collection of 40 stories describing homosexual love affairs between samurai men and boys and between young kabuki actors and their middle-class patrons.
Seventeenth-century Kyoto was the center of a flourishing publishing industry, and for the first time in Japan's history it became possible for writers to live exclusively on their earnings.
When he undertook the writing of Nanshoku okagami in 1687, it was with the express purpose of extending his readership and satisfying his ambition to be published in the three major cities of his day, Kyoto, Osaka, and Edo.
www.iblist.com /book.php?id=30462   (413 words)

  
 Male colors [electronic resource] :
Unfettered by the moral opporbium that constrained - or concealed - male-male eroticism in Europe, male colors flew brightly in the public culture of urban Japan.
Gary Leupp explores the practices and the cultural celebration of the Edo-era nanshoku tradition in this exuberant, sensitive, and yet dispassionate social and cultural history of male homoeroticism, the best modern scholarly study in English to date.
Leupp ranges widely in a vast array of original literary, dramatic, and visual sources, which he brings to life with a finely textured use of comparative material from other traditions of male-male love both in East Asia and across the premodern world.
ark.cdlib.org:8085 /data/mets/5q/ft8q2nb65q.mets.xml   (401 words)

  
 Fallen Warriors as Mass Media Stars: Popular Representations of Heike Monogatari in the Edo Period
Unlike the fierce warriors of early depictions, however, all three were imbued with a courtly nobility and a feminine form of beauty.
As in the nanshoku ideal, each of these "beautiful youths" has a grizzled, tough and experienced counterpart, Benkei for Yoshitsune, Kumagae no Naozane for Atsumori.
Though certainly not the only reason for the popularity of these two figures in the eighteenth century, the erotic depictions of Atsumori and Yoshitsune represent a further domesticization (or perhaps "urbanization") and softening of the image of the hard warrior in his submersion into the world of (bi)sexual pleasure.
instruct1.cit.cornell.edu /courses/asian490/students1999/danmckee/page3.html   (972 words)

  
 1996 AAS Abstracts: Japan Session 9
This is not a standard periodization in historical study, but it works in this instance, cutting out at one end the 'Golden Age' of nanshoku in mid-Edo, and at the other the pathologization of homosexuality.
I propose that what is today located in Genroku was thought of as received behavior throughout early Edo, but was then forced back during Kansei into earlier history, especially Sengoku, removing nanshoku from the Tokugawa dispensation.
Wakashu portraits, for example, formerly popular, disappear from Kansei art, likewise fuzoku paintings suggesting a normalcy for same-gender eroticism; onna-girai (exclusive same-sex orientation, including adult) was utterly submerged in the inequality of adult-child nanshoku.
www.aasianst.org /absts/1996abst/japan/j9.htm   (1152 words)

  
 Gay History : Pre-Modern Japan
Graduate paper on Japanese gay samurai iconography, with prints depicting 'nanshoku' and homosexuality...
Date Added : 11 June 2005, Link :
Help build the largest human-edited directory on the web.
www.gaire.com /history_pre-modern_japan   (155 words)

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