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Topic: Narses


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In the News (Mon 19 Aug 19)

  
  Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal
When, Bahram III died in 293 without issue, there was a contention between the brothers Narses and Hormazd of whom Narses was preferred by the Persians and ascended the throne in 293.
Narses, moreover, ought not to be accounted a weaker prince than other Persian kings; thou hast indeed conquered him, but then thou surpassest all other monarchs; and thus Narses has of course been worsted by thee, though he is no whit inferior in merit to the best of his ancestors.
However, it is well-known that Narses was already dead by the time of Hormizd's death in 309 for the throne passed onto Hormizd's still-unborn son Shapur.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Narseh   (0 words)

  
 Narses: Free Encyclopedia Articles at Questia.com Online Library
In 538 he was sent to Italy to cooperate with Belisarius; their dissensions delayed the campaign, and he was recalled.
As...ramifications in terms of explaining the march of Narses and his armies from Aquileia through territory...Biondos attempt to deny the first trip of Narses to Italy, 538-539 A.D.: cf.
NARSES nar sez, c.478 c.573, Byzantine official and general, one of the eunuchs of the palace.
www.questia.com /library/encyclopedia/101260554   (0 words)

  
  NARSES (c. 478—573) - Online Information article about NARSES (c. 478—573)
The first interference of Narses with the plans of Belisarius was beneficial.
Gibbon's statement that Narses was " the first and most powerful of the exarchs " is more correct in substance than in form.
Narses was short in stature and lean in figure.
encyclopedia.jrank.org /NAN_NEW/NARSES_c_478573_.html   (2879 words)

  
 Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, page 1140 (v. 2)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Narses reaped the fruits of his victory by receiving the keys of the strongest fortresses of the Goths in that portion of Italy.
Narses now marched to the north, reducing one fortress after the other, and gaining the confidence of the inhabitants through his firm yet generous and faithful conduct.
During many subsequent years the name of Narses is not once mentioned ; but we cannot but presume that in regulating the domestic affairs of Italy he acted in a way that did credit to his genius, although we know that his con­duct was far from being free from avarice.
www.ancientlibrary.com /smith-bio/2248.html   (940 words)

  
 Narses Biography
Narses (478-573) was one of the two great generals in the service of the Eastern Roman Emperor Justinian I during the so-called "Reconquest" that took place during his reign.
Narses spent most of his life as a relatively unimportant eunuch in the place of the emperors in Constantinople, but when Justinian became emperor in 527, historical events conspired to make him famous.
Narses remained in Italy as its prefect (governor), but his administration was unpopular.
www.biographybase.com /biography/Narses.html   (302 words)

  
 Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, page 1141 (v. 2)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
He might have borne his disgrace with magnanimity but for the insulting message of the empress Sophia, who bade him leave the profession of arms to men, and resume his former occupations among the eunuchs, and spin wool with the maidens of the palace.
The ambition of Narses was not only unlimited, but it was coupled with that irri­table and resentful temper which is peculiar to wo­men and eunuchs.
Narses was one of those rare men who are des­ tined by Providence to rise above all others, and, according to circumstances or the particular shape of their genius, to become either the benefactors or the scourges of mankind.
www.ancientlibrary.com /smith-bio/2249.html   (1005 words)

  
 Narses
Narses (478-573) was one of the two great generals in the service of the Eastern Roman Emperor Justinian I during the so-called "Reconquest" that took place during his reign.
Narses spent most of his life as a relatively unimportant eunuch in the place of the emperors in Constantinople, but when Justinian became emperor in 527, historical events conspired to make him famous.
Narses relinquished his post, but refused to leave Italy, instead retiring to a villa near Naples.
www.xasa.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/n/na/narses.html   (319 words)

  
 Midgard's ATL Dark Ages Map - Alternate History Discussion Board   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Leaving Narses as his viceroy in Italy, Belisarius departs East with an army consisting both of the Latin Italians and Goths, who by now are considered full citizens of the Empire.
Of Narses' two brothers, one was a eunuch like himself, but the youngest, John, had shown some promise already as a civil servant.
Narses attempts to bethrothe Theodora to his brother, however, with the suspicions that he was involved in Belisarius' death, he gets a denial from Ravenna.
www.alternatehistory.com /discussion/showthread.php?p=891355   (19319 words)

  
 Narses - HighBeam Encyclopedia
Narses, c.478-c.573, Byzantine official and general, one of the eunuchs of the palace.
He assisted in the suppression of the Nika riot (532) by bribing the Blues of the Circus (see Blues and Greens) to return their allegiance to Justinian I.
In 538 he was sent to Italy to cooperate with Belisarius ; their dissensions delayed the campaign, and he was recalled.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-Narses.html   (356 words)

  
 Chapter Reign Of Diocletian And This Three Associates. of History of The Decline And Fall of The Roman Empire by Gibbon
Notwithstanding the justice of the Persian cause, he was empowered to submit the present differences to the decision of the emperors themselves; convinced as he was, that, in the midst of prosperity, they would not be unmindful of the vicissitudes of fortune.
He dismissed Apharban with a hope that Narses would soon be informed on what conditions he might obtain, from the clemency of the emperors, a lasting peace, and the restoration of his wives and children.
As this was the only article to which he refused his consent, it was no longer insisted on; and the emperors either suffered the trade to flow in its natural channels, or contented themselves with such restrictions, as it depended on their own authority to establish.
www.bibliomania.com /2/1/62/109/25655/10.html   (692 words)

  
 Battle of Taginae
In the Spring of 552, Justinian's eunuch general Narses recruited a large army of Byzantines (East Romans) and barbarians, including Lombards and Heruli.
Both generals tried to inspire their men with speeches, Narses emphasising the Byzantine superiority in numbers, Totila the importance of the battle, and the mercenary nature of their opponents.
Narses formed his army in a defensive arc, dismounting his Lombards and Heruli to form the centre, and flanking them with his Byzantine cavalry.
www.fernweb.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk /mf/taginae.htm   (566 words)

  
 The Decline And Fall Of The Roman Empire Chapter 43
The talents of Narses were tried and improved in frequent embassies: he led an army into Italy acquired a practical knowledge of the war and the country, and presumed to strive with the genius of Belisarius.
The justice or passion of Narses was awakened: he summoned the offender to his presence, and without listening to his excuses, gave the signal to the minister of death.
After the battle of Casilinum, Narses entered the capital; the arms and treasures of the Goths, the Franks, and the Alamanni, were displayed; his soldiers, with garlands in their hands, chanted the praises of the conqueror; and Rome, for the last time, beheld the semblance of a triumph.
www.ccel.org /g/gibbon/decline/volume2/chap43.htm   (15630 words)

  
 JOHN III
Narses, the famous eunuch and general who completed the conquest of Italy from the Goths, continued to protect the country in the first years of John's pontificate.
According to the "Liber Pontificalis," Narses had gone down to Naples when Pope John, realizing how necessary he was for the country's safety, went to Naples and pleaded with him to return.
Narses was accused of inviting the Lombards into Italy, but this is far from certain.
www.cfpeople.org /Books/Pope/POPEp61.htm   (520 words)

  
 Pope John III
By feminine intrigue at the court of Constantinople, a charge of treason was trumped up against the general, and, in consequence, the only man capable of resisting the barbarians was recalled.
It is quite possible that Narses may then have invited the Lombards to fall upon Italy; but it is perhaps more probable that, hearing of his recall, they invaded the country.
Knowing that Narses was the hope of Italy, John followed him to Naples, and implored him not to go to Constantinople.
www.catholicity.com /encyclopedia/j/john_iii,pope.html   (447 words)

  
 Rodolphe Guilland, "Les Eunuques dans l'Empire Byzantin" (English)
This is the Narses to whom the Patria allude (II 249; Codin 104).
Narses was a valiant general, and his name alone spread terror among the ranks of his enemies.
None of the historians mentions that the latter Narses was a eunuch; nonetheless, the titles of cubicularius and praepositus are meaningful enough to confirm this.
www.well.com /user/aquarius/guilland-eunuques.htm   (13232 words)

  
 The Battle of Cremona - 544 AD
Narses himself took command of the centre, stationing the fierce Heruls to the fore.
Narses had deemed the river too much of an obstacle to attempt to send an out-flanking force over to the south.
Narses' guards had finally managed to extricate him from the wrack of his fleeing command, and the sight of his presence bolstered the resolve of the Byzantine foot archers.
www.ritsumei.ac.jp /se/~luv20009/6thC.html   (2484 words)

  
 - Chapter 27
In the rear of the kathisma, Narses sneered.
Narses did not have the time to wait, for years, while Justinian exhausted the Roman Empire in his grandiose attempt to reconstruct its ancient glory.
Narses took Balban by the arm and pointed over the wall separating the kathisma from the Hippodrome.
www.baen.com /library/0671878859/0671878859__27.htm   (0 words)

  
 Battle of Casilinum
The Byzantine commander, Narses, was busy mopping up the last of the Gothic resistance in central Italy when word came that the Franks had crossed the River Po.
Narses' army marched south towards him and established their own fortified camp nearby.
The Franks - who were mostly infantry - tended to advance in deep columns, too solid easily to be broken by flank attacks - if attacked from the side the column would halt and turn to face the direction of the attack.
www.fernweb.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk /mf/casilin.htm   (518 words)

  
 The Battle of Cremona - 544 AD
Narses himself took command of the centre, stationing the fierce Heruls to the fore.
Narses had deemed the river too much of an obstacle to attempt to send an out-flanking force over to the south.
Narses' guards had finally managed to extricate him from the wrack of his fleeing command, and the sight of his presence bolstered the resolve of the Byzantine foot archers.
www.ne.jp /asahi/luke/ueda-sarson/6thC.html   (2587 words)

  
 Rome - Vol I, Chapter XIII, Part 3
Notwithstanding the justice of the Persian cause, he was empowered to submit the present differences to the decision of the emperors themselves; convinced as he was, that, in the midst of prosperity, they would not be unmindful of the vicissitudes of fortune.
He dismissed Apharban with a hope that Narses would soon be informed on what conditions he might obtain, from the clemency of the emperors, a lasting peace, and the restoration of his wives and children.
As this was the only article to which he refused his consent, it was no longer insisted on; and the emperors either suffered the trade to flow in its natural channels, or contented themselves with such restrictions, as it depended on their own authority to establish.
www.cca.org /cm/rome/vol1/ch1303.html   (2630 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Nisibis
Recaptured by the Osrhoenians in 194, it was again conquered by Septimius Severus who made it his headquarters and established a colony there (ibid., LXXV, 23).
In 297, by the treaty with Narses, the province of
The latter dictated the statutes of the new school.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/11084c.htm   (0 words)

  
 Heathen Harvest - Reviews: Barditus - Die Letzten Goten
Narses a 75 year old castrated eunuch who took control of the Roman Empire after several successful military campaigns against “barbarians” or heathen folk is a lead character in this drama.
Responding to this threat Teia the last king of the Ostrogoths marched his army into battle to confront Narses who had proven himself to be a bane upon the Ostrogoths in earlier conflicts one of which cost the Ostrogoths their previous king.
The Ostrogoths power in Italy was eliminated, but Narses allowed the few survivors to return to their homes as subjects of the empire.
www.heathenharvest.com /article.php?story=20050428135104774   (1357 words)

  
 NARSES Articles Narses (also sometimes written Ners
Narses (also sometimes written Nerses) (478-573) was with Belisarius, one of the great generals in the service of the Eastern Roman Emperor Justinian I during the so-called "Reconquest" that took place during Justinian's reign.
Narses was a Romanized Armenian from the noble Kamsarakan family, which claimed descent from the royal Arsacid dynasty.
He was 74 in 552, when the ever-suspicious Justinian recalled Belisarius from his campaign against the Ostrogoths in Italy and replaced him with Narses.
www.amazines.com /Narses_related.html   (504 words)

  
 Narseh, Narseus Narses - LoveToKnow 1911
NARSES, NARSEH, NARSEUS, king of Persia, son of Shapur I. He rose as pretender to the throne against his grand-nephew Bahram III.
This peace, concluded in 297, lasted for forty years.
Narses died in 303 and was succeeded by his son Hormizd II.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Narseh%2C_Narseus_Narses   (0 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Pope John III
The most important of the acts of this pope were those connected with the great general, Narses.
It is quite possible that Narses may then have invited the Lombards to fall upon Italy; but it is perhaps more probable that, hearing of his recall, they invaded the country.
But seemingly the court party in the city was too strong for Narses and the pope.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/08422a.htm   (0 words)

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