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Topic: Native Esperanto speakers


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  Esperanto
Esperanto is particularly prevalent in the northern and eastern countries of Europe; in China, Korea, Japan, and Iran within Asia; in Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico in the Americas; and in Togo and Madagascar in Africa.
An estimate of the number of Esperanto speakers was made by Sidney S. Culbert, a retired psychology professor of the University of Washington and a longtime Esperantist, who tracked down and tested Esperanto speakers in sample areas of dozens of countries over a period of twenty years.
Ethnologue also states that there are 200 to 2000 native Esperanto speakers (''denaskuloj''), who have learned the language from birth from their Esperanto-speaking parents (this happens when Esperanto is the family language in an international family or sometimes in a family of devoted Esperantists).
www.seattleluxury.com /encyclopedia/entry/Esperanto   (3736 words)

  
 Esperanto   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Esperanto is an "artificial" language first published in 1887 by Ludovik L. Zamenhof (1859-1917) after extensive thought and experimentation.
His efforts were brilliantly successful in that Esperanto is the only deliberately created language to have generated and sustained a body of fluent (or even semi-fluent) speakers.
Of course Esperanto has not succeeded in achieving sufficient international visibility to be used in all the contexts where it would be useful.
www.flw.com /languages/esperanto.htm   (300 words)

  
  Esperanto - Encyclopedia.WorldSearch   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Esperanto is not an official language of any country, although there were plans at the beginning of the 20th century to establish Neutral Moresnet as the world's first Esperanto state, and the shortlived artificial island micronation of Rose Island used Esperanto as its official language in 1968.
Esperanto is primarily agglutinative (Wells 1989 calculates an index of agglutinativity of 0.9999, higher than any non-constructed language), with all grammatical function suffixes appearing at the ends of words, and a mix of prefixes and suffixes with lexical meanings.
Esperanto speakers seem to be more numerous in Europe and east Asia than in the Americas, Africa and Oceania, and more numerous in urban than in rural areas (Sikosek 2003).
encyclopedia.worldsearch.com /esperanto.htm   (3197 words)

  
 Native Esperanto speakers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Native Esperanto speakers (in Esperanto denaskuloj) come to be in families in which Esperanto (and usually other languages) is spoken.
Esperanto is not the mainstream language in any geographic region, outside of temporary gatherings (such as conventions like the World Congress of Esperanto) and isolated offices (such as the World Esperanto Association's central office in Rotterdam).
Probably the most famous native speaker of Esperanto is businessman George Soros.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Native_Esperanto_speakers   (235 words)

  
 Kids.net.au - Encyclopedia Esperanto -
Esperanto (eo and epo in ISO 639) is the most widely spoken of the constructed languages.
Esperanto has proven to be a good deal easier for speakers of European languages to learn as a second language than any national language (especially highly irregular and/or non-phonetic languages such as English, French, and Chinese).
Because Esperanto is the most well-known of constructed languages, many who have been interested were unaware of these other languages, but there is information about these languages on the Internet as well.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/es/Esperanto   (1436 words)

  
 Esperanto   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Esperanto is not an official language of any country, although there were plans at the beginning of the 20th century to establish MoresnetNeutral Moresnet as the world's first Esperanto state, and the shortlived artificial island micronation of Rose Island used Esperanto as its official language in 1968.
Esperanto is written using a modified version of the Latin alphabet, with six accented letters: c-circumflexĉ, g-circumflexĝ, h-circumflexĥ, j-circumflexĵ, s-circumflexŝ (c, g, h, j, and s with circumflex), and u-breveŭ (u with breve).
Esperanto speakers seem to be more numerous in Europe and east Asia than in the Americas, Africa and Oceania, and more numerous in urban than in rural areas (#ReferencesSikosek 2003/).
www.infothis.com /find/Esperanto   (3535 words)

  
 An Esperanto Overview
Some speakers of Esperanto have become so enthusiastic about the language that they have chosen to use it at home, even when they share a common native language, and so their children learn the language as their native tongue.
Esperanto organizations were banned in Germany in the mid-1930s, and Esperanto speakers in the territories occupied during World War II were either discouraged (generally in the occupied West) or exterminated (more common in the occupied East).
Esperanto was barely tolerated in Romania under the Ceaucescu regime, and most Esperanto books and magazines were excluded from the country (they were nonetheless smuggled in on a regular basis by Bulgarian, Hungarian and Jugoslavian Esperanto speakers).
www.webcom.com /~donh/efaq.html   (2429 words)

  
 Jordan: Note on Esperanto
Esperanto is an attractive object of interest for the body of literature that has been created in it and for the cross-cultural contacts that can be made through it.
Esperanto is obviously interesting as a linguistic object, although professional linguistics at the moment is much concerned about "native-speaker intuitions" and therefore pays little attention to a language used virtually exclusively by non-native speakers (or, for that matter, to ancient languages).
Designed as a universally accessible means of communication, Esperanto is one of the great functional projects for the emancipation of humankind -- one which aims to let every individual citizen participate fully in the human community, securely rooted in his or her local cultural and language identity yet not limited by it.
weber.ucsd.edu /~dkjordan/es/esperant.html   (2779 words)

  
 Native Esperanto speakers: Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com - All about Native Esperanto speakers
Often one or both parents choose to use Esperanto as the main language in communicating with the children, who thus acquire the language in the way as other children acquire their native languages.
In that case one of the parents, usually the father, chooses to use Esperanto with the children in order to enrich their native knowledge and experience.
It is therefore important to the language skill of native Esperanto speakers if parents regularly bring their children to Esperanto conventions.
www.encyclopedian.com /de/Denaskaj-infanoj.html   (295 words)

  
 en:esperanto [Esperanto-Societo de la Karolinoj kaj Virginio]
Esperanto is a language, one famed for being remarkably easy to learn but capable of a great range and depth of expression.
Esperanto is one of the languages routinely used by the Pope in his Christmas and Easter messages, for example, but it’s also easy to find Esperanto-speaking Protestants, Jews, Buddhists, Muslims, Bahais, Shintoists, and adherents of other faiths.
The kernel of what became Esperanto was introduced by Dr. L.L. Zamenhof of Warsaw, a linguist, author, and physician, in the 19th century, who based on the most widely spoken and taught natural languages of that era (in fact, a similar set of languages to those that are ancestral to modern English).
www.esperanto-nc.org /doku.php?id=en:esperanto   (950 words)

  
 native esperanto speakers - Article and Reference from OnPedia.com
Native Esperanto speakers come to be in families in which Esperanto (and usually other languages) are spoken.
As with all children who speak a language that is not the mainstream one in their culture, it is extremely helpful to meet regularly with other native speakers.
Esperanto speaking families gathers a detailed list of Esperanto-speaking families.
www.onpedia.com /encyclopedia/Native-Esperanto-speakers   (174 words)

  
 Esperanto - Unipedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Esperanto speakers are more numerous in Europe and East Asia than in the Americas, Africa and Oceania, and more numerous in urban than in rural areas (Sikosek 2003).
Esperanto is particularly prevalent in the northern and eastern countries of Europe; in China, Korea, Japan, and Iran within Asia; in Brazil, Argentina, and Mexico in the Americas; and in Togo and Madagascar in Africa.
An estimate of the number of Esperanto speakers was made by Sidney S. Culbert, a retired psychology professor of the University of Washington and a longtime Esperantist, who tracked down and tested all Esperanto speakers in sample areas of dozens of countries over a period of twenty years.
www.unipedia.info /Esperanto.html   (3040 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Esperanto has no official status in any country, but is an elective part of the curriculum in several state educational systems.
An estimate of the number of Esperanto speakers was made by the late Sidney S. Culbert, a retired psychology professor of the University of Washington and a longtime Esperantist, who tracked down and tested Esperanto speakers in sample areas of dozens of countries over a period of twenty years.
Esperanto is the first language for teaching and administration of the International Academy of Sciences San Marino, which is sometimes called an "Esperanto University", although it does not teach the language, but in the language.
stron.frm.pl /wiki.php?title=Esperanto   (4852 words)

  
 EUROPE'S BABYLON
To set Esperanto, associated in most people's minds with a woolly and basically unsuccessful utopianism rather than with everyday reality, on the same conceptual level as the leviathan of World English may seem to be carrying the debate beyond the bounds of relevancy.
A cultured Esperanto speaker will further have at least passing acquaintance with a corpus of standard original and translated works and with the basic history of the language, knowledge of which is passed on through formal means (examinations), semi-formal means (seminars and popular books) and by interpersonal contact.
Much has been written, mostly in Esperanto, on the possible reasons for this; but it is perhaps enough to remind ourselves that language is a uniquely complex social and psychological phenomenon which we are far from understanding in an analytical sense, even while we use it to write and read these words.
esperantic.org /ced/eurlan.htm   (6338 words)

  
 How and why to learn Esperanto
Esperanto means hopeful, and its speakers are hopeful that it will be accepted for what it is. Because Esperantists (Esperanto speakers) are dispersed throughout the world, it sometimes unites people who speak vastly different languages (i.e.
Also, Esperanto has been proposed by some (though not all agree) computer linguists to be used to program and interact with a computer on the grounds that it would be easier to teach a man-made language to a man-made computer than to teach it an irregular, exclusionary national language.
Esperanto has received a lot of criticism (much of it undeserved) for the fact that it aims to be neutral, and not allied with any nation.
www.micheloud.com /FXM/LA/la/esperanto.htm   (1229 words)

  
 cars - Esperanto
Esperanto is not an official language of any country, although there were plans at the beginning of the 20th century to establish Neutral Moresnet as the world's first Esperanto state, and the shortlived artificial island micronation of Rose Island used Esperanto as its official language in 1968.
Esperanto is primarily agglutinative (Wells 1989 calculates an index of agglutinativity of 0.9999, higher than any non-constructed language), with all grammatical function suffixes appearing at the ends of words, and a mix of prefixes and suffixes with lexical meanings.
Esperanto speakers seem to be more numerous in Europe and east Asia than in the Americas, Africa and Oceania, and more numerous in urban than in rural areas (Sikosek 2003).
www.carluvers.com /cars/Esperanto_language   (3510 words)

  
 Tritz was brought to you by the letter e
Esperanto belongs to the Esperantists: Developers of constructed languages are usually extremely possessive of their brain-children and reject any attempt by others to contribute or have a significant role in the development of the language.
Esperanto is also credited as being the foundation for later competing projects, such as Interlingua and Occidental, but these languages lag far behind Esperanto in terms of speakers.
The transliteration of Esperanto into ASCII is a topic known to cause flame wars and little constructive discussion, and the reduction of such behaviour is sometimes indicated as one of the main reasons to use Unicode and the proper accented letters.
www.chocobo.org /~tritoch/tritz.cgi?do=alphabet&letter=e   (3187 words)

  
 Esperanto speakers gathering in Beijing
Esperanto was invented by Polish L L Zamenhof in 1887.
He said that as a language, Esperanto has been remarkably successful in the past century as it works well in all situations, although there are not enough Esperanto speakers in the world.
"Esperanto allows communication on an equal footing between people, with neither having the usual cultural advantages given to native speakers," said Yu Tao, secretary-general of the All-China Esperanto League, which was founded in 1951.
www.chinadaily.com.cn /english/doc/2004-07/26/content_351555.htm   (546 words)

  
 Esperanto - Uncyclopedia, the content-free encyclopedia
Esperanto is a constructed language intended to foster communication between Chinese scientists, Venezuelan fashion models, and agents of the worldwide Jewish conspiracy.
The total number of Esperanto speakers is a subject of much debate; estimates range from zero to Avogadro's number.
The vast majority of speakers learned it as a second language, but there is a small number of "native" Esperanto speakers who, because of the language's simplicity, were able to achieve verbal fluency while still in the womb.
uncyclopedia.org /wiki/Esperanto   (905 words)

  
 Learn Esperanto Language - Free Conversational Esperanto Lessons Online - Common Esperanto Words and Phrases   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
But if the speaker says, "how are is your dog?", You'll instantly be able to recognize it's the same phrase asking about age, but you need to be able to pick out the new word introduced...
Nothing beats actually talking to a native speaker in their language as often as possible.
Esperanto Language Exchange Pen-Pals - Community of people from around the world interested in teaching you their language and sharing their culture with you.
www.phrasebase.com /learn/esperanto.php   (1866 words)

  
 A Brief Introduction to Esperanto
Esperanto is an international language, designed to be everyone's "second tongue." It was developed over a century ago to provide a neutral and easily learned means of communication between people from different language groups.
Esperanto is the medium for several international radio programs, and a multitude of international organizations and meetings.
Esperanto is specifically intended to be used across national and cultural boundaries.
lodestone.org /people/hoss/esperanto/intro.html   (652 words)

  
 Read about Native Esperanto speakers at WorldVillage Encyclopedia. Research Native Esperanto speakers and learn about ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-04)
Some native Esperanto speakers grow up in an all-Esperanto neighbourhood or go to an Esperanto school, and are thus exposed to Esperanto culture.
For those that don't, Esperanto is not the mainstream language in their culture, and as such, it is extremely helpful to meet regularly with other native speakers.
Esperanto speaking families (http://familioj.komputilo.org) — gathers a detailed list of Esperanto-speaking families.
encyclopedia.worldvillage.com /s/b/Native_Esperanto_speakers   (241 words)

  
 Esperanto - Objectivism Online Forum
Esperanto is an International Auxiliary Language (IAL), "international" because it is spoken all over the world and has no home country, "auxiliary" because it is not meant to replace languages, but to be a commonly-held second language that everyone can use to speak to foreigners.
Esperanto is irregular in that form-meaning relations are not strictly compositional, cf.
Esperanto is like any other technological improvement; the infrastructure isn't there yet, but those who could envisage the long-term benefits decided to learn it, knowing they wouldn't be able to speak to many people for a while.
forum.objectivismonline.net /index.php?showtopic=1403   (5038 words)

  
 LINGUIST List 4.900: Esperanto
It is frequently the case that Esperanto is the only common language of the parents of native Esperanto speaking children.
I may already have read more poetry and prose in Esperanto than the average native speaker of English does in his or her entire life, so I don't think of myself as being badly out of touch with Esperanto culture.
Children who learn Esperanto only by speaking it with their parents are likely to end up with a knowledge of Esperanto that is limited in various ways.
www.sfs.nphil.uni-tuebingen.de /linguist/issues/4/4-900.html   (1536 words)

  
 NASK - Esperanto
It is expected that questions of ordinary grammar and usage will be infrequent and may be answered outside of the class structure, although special language usages (such as literary devices, specialized language forms, language development, etc.) may be discussed in relation to the broader themes of the course.
Students should also have familiarity with the general outlines of the history of Esperanto, the Esperanto movement, and the international culture of Esperanto speakers.
A variety of material from Esperanto literature will be used, and students will be expected to use books in the library collection and resources on-line.
www.esperanto.org /sfsu/cour3000an.php   (673 words)

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