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Topic: Nebuchadrezzar II


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  Nebuchadrezzar II - New World Encyclopedia
Nebuchadrezzar was the oldest son and successor of Nabopolassar, who delivered Babylon from its dependence on Assyria and laid the great city of Nineveh in ruins.
From Nebuchadrezzar's inscriptions and from the number of temples erected or restored by this prince, it seems that he was a very devout man. What is known of his history shows him to have been of a humane disposition, in striking contrast with the display of wanton cruelty of most Assyrian rulers.
Nebuchadrezzar showed much consideration to Jeremiah, leaving him free to accompany the exiles to Babylon or to remain in Jerusalem and appointing one of the prophet's friends, Gedaliah son of Ahikam, to the governorship of Judah.
www.newworldencyclopedia.org /entry/Nebuchadrezzar_II   (0 words)

  
 Nebuchadrezzar II Summary
After the defeat of the Cimmerians and Scythians, all of Nebuchadrezzar's expeditions were directed westwards, although a powerful neighbour lay to the North; the cause of this was that a wise political marriage with Amuhia, the daughter of the Median king, had insured a lasting peace between the two empires.
From Nebuchadrezzar's inscriptions and from the number of temples erected or restored by this prince we gather that he was a very devout man. What we know of his history shows him to have been of a humane disposition, in striking contrast with the display of wanton cruelty of most Assyrian rulers.
Nebuchadrezzar died in Babylon between the second and sixth months of the forty-third year of his reign.
www.bookrags.com /Nebuchadrezzar_II   (1751 words)

  
 The Chaldeans, Nebuchadnezzar
Nebuchadrezzar II was the oldest son and successor of Nabopolassar, founder of the Chaldean empire.
Nebuchadrezzar's strategic planning appeared in his attack on the Arab tribes of northwestern Arabia, in preparation for the occupation of Judah.
A corresponding attitude to Nebuchadrezzar, as God's instrument against wrongdoers, occurs in the Apocrypha in 1 Esdras and, as protector to be prayed for, in Baruch.
history-world.org /chaldeansneb.htm   (844 words)

  
 Iraq 101
Later, Nebuchadrezzar II (Nabopolassar's son) inherited the empire of Babylonia.
In the 6th century BC (586 BC), Nebuchadrezzar II conquered Judea (Judah), destroyed Jerusalem; Solomon's Temple was also destroyed; Nebuchadrezzar II carried away an estimated 15,000 captives, and sent most of its population into exile in Babylonia.
King Faisal II and `Abd al-Ilāh were executed in the gardens of ar-Rihāb Palace.
iraq101.blogspot.com   (0 words)

  
 The Neo-
When the father died in 605, Nebuchadrezzar was with his army in Syria; he had just crushed the Egyptians near Carchemish in a cruel, bloody battle and pursued them into the south.
Nebuchadrezzar laid siege to Tyre for 13 years without taking the city, because there was no fleet at his disposal.
Nebuchadrezzar lived at peace with Media throughout his reign and acted as a mediator after the Median-Lydian war of 590-585.
www.angelfire.com /nt/Gilgamesh/neobabyl.html   (1759 words)

  
 Nebuchadrezzar (c. 630 - c. 561 B.C.)
Nebuchadrezzar's further military activities are known not from extant chronicles but from other sources, particularly the Bible, which records another attack on Jerusalem and a siege of Tyre (lasting 13 years, according to the Jewish historian Flavius Josephus) and hints at an invasion of Egypt.
Much influenced by the Assyrian imperial tradition, Nebuchadrezzar consciously pursued a policy of expansion, claiming the grant of universal kingship by Marduk and praying to have "no opponent from horizon to sky." From cuneiform fragments he is known to have attempted the invasion of Egypt, the culmination of his expansionist policy, in 568/567.
In addition to being a brilliant tactician and strategist, Nebuchadrezzar was also prominent in international diplomacy, as shown in his sending an ambassador (probably Nabonidus, a successor) to mediate between the Medes and Lydians in Asia Minor.
www.thelatinlibrary.com /imperialism/notes/nebuchadrezzar.html   (1030 words)

  
 Nebuchadrezzar II - Chaldeans Wiki
Nebuchadrezzar II (also Nebuchadnezzar; reigned 605 BC - 562 BC), is perhaps the best known ruler of Babylon in the Chaldean Dynasty.
After the defeat of the Cimmerians and Scythians, all of Nebuchadrezzar's expeditions were directed westwards, although a powerful neighbour lay to the North; the cause of this was that a wise political marriage with Amuhia, the daughter of the Median king, had insured a lasting peace between the two empires.
From Nebuchadrezzar's inscriptions and from the number of temples erected or restored by this prince we gather that he was a very devout man. What we know of his history shows him to have been of a humane disposition, in striking contrast with the display of wanton cruelty of most Assyrian rulers.
www.chaldeans.org /wiki/index.php?title=Nebuchadrezzar_II&printable=yes   (1313 words)

  
 Nebuchadnezzar II - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Nebuchadnezzar II (reigned 605-562 bc), greatest king of the neo-Babylonian, or Chaldean, dynasty, who conquered much of southwestern Asia; known...
Nebuchadrezzar II (also Nebuchadnezzar; reigned 605 BC–562 BC) is perhaps the best known ruler of Babylon in the Chaldean Dynasty.
Definition: The son of Nabopolassar, the Chaldean restorer of Babylonian independence, King Nebuchadnezzar II (605-562) was the most important king of the Second or Neo-Babylonian Empire.
encarta.msn.com /Nebuchadnezzar_II.html   (220 words)

  
 Living in Truth by Charles N.Pope - Chapter 40:"I Will Wipe Jerusalem as a Dish"(The Destruction of Thebes)
Nebuchadrezzar I was the known contemporary and rival of Tiglath-pileser I (Takelot I) son of Assur-resha-ishi (Sheshonq/Aye).
In this case, Shilak-Inshushinak the illustrious predecessor of Nebuchadrezzar in Elam was logically Amenhotep III (Shiloh-Solomon).
Nebuchadrezzar as Moses, and Assurbanipal as Aaron, were determined not only to bind together the whole world under their dual kingship, but also orchestrate another Exodus of "Hebrews" from Egypt.
www.domainofman.com /book/chap-40.html   (7338 words)

  
 Babylon - Tower of Babel - Crystalinks
It was under the rule of king Nebuchadrezzar II (605 BC-562 BC) that Babylon became one of the most splendid cities of the ancient world.
Nebuchadrezzar ordered the complete reconstruction of the imperial grounds, including rebuilding the Etemenanki ziggurat and the construction of the Ishtar Gate -- the most spectacular of eight gates that ringed the perimeter of Babylon.
Nebuchadrezzar is also credited with the construction of the Hanging Gardens of Babylon (one of the seven wonders of the ancient world), said to have been built for his homesick wife Amyitis.
www.crystalinks.com /babylon.html   (2605 words)

  
 Africa and the Middle East: Right Side
The greatest king of the Neo-Babylonian Empire, Nebuchadrezzar II is well known from the Bible as the king who destroyed Jerusalem in 587 BCE.
For his projects, Nebuchadrezzar had each brick used in the construction stamped with his name and titles to assure that everyone knew who had built the structure.
Nebuchadrezzar, King of Babylon, the one who provides for the temples Esagila and Ezida, foremost son and heir of Nabopolassar, King of Babylon.
www.spurlock.uiuc.edu /vtour/Africa/kingship_nebuchad.html   (120 words)

  
 Intolerance (1916)   (Site not responding. Last check: )
605 BC -- death of Nabopolassar, and ascendance to the throne of Nebuchadrezzar II.
Nebuchadrezzar erected a large idol for worship during a public ceremony on the plain of Dura.
Again according to the Bible, Nebuchadrezzar loses his sanity and lives in the wild like an animal for seven years, after which he regains his sanity and position.
www.vernonjohns.org /snuffy1186/intolerance_1916.html   (557 words)

  
 BAAL (1)
Nebuchadrezzar, after his accession, completed the two great walls, lined the ditches with brick, and increased the thickness of the two walls which his father had built.
Besides Nebuchadrezzar’s inscriptions, various other texts give details concerning the topography of Babylon, among them being the contract-tablets, which mention various districts or quarters of the city, such as Te which is within Babylon; the city of Sula which is within Babylon; the new city which is within Babylon, upon the new canal.
Nebuchadrezzar I: The most famous king of this dynasty, in fact of this era, was Nebuchadrezzar I, who re-established firmly the rule of Babylon.
www.heraldmag.org /olb/Contents/dictionaries/0BISBE.htm   (19573 words)

  
 6Th Century B.C.: The People's Chronology
Egypt's 26th dynasty king Necho II dies after a 15-year reign and is succeeded by his son, who will defend his southern borders against the kingdom of Cush in his 6-year reign as Psamtik II.
Egypt's 26th dynasty king Psamtik II dies after a 6-year reign in which he has crushed the Cushites to his south with help from Greek, Jewish, and Phoenician mercenaries, obliterating the names and royal emblems that have memorialized the 25th (Cushite) dynasty from statues and reliefs.
The former Egyptian king Apries invades his former realm with support from Babylon's Nebuchadnezzar II (Nebuchadrezzar II), but he is defeated and imprisoned; although he escapes, he is later murdered by the usurper Ahmose II, who has him buried with full military honors.
history.enotes.com /peoples-chronology/year-6th-century-b-c   (3898 words)

  
 Ethics of Assyrian, Babylonian, and Persian Empires by Sanderson Beck
In the eleventh century BC Nebuchadrezzar I was celebrated in an epic poem; Sinleqeunnimi of Uruk produced a humanized version of the Epic of Gilgamesh; and another poet expressed the workings of divine justice, an important concept in Babylonian religion.
Assyria's Sargon II defeated dozens of Median chiefs and settled 30,000 captured Israelis in the towns of the Medes in the late eighth century BC.
Darius, the oldest son of Artaxerxes II by Queen Stateira, was executed for plotting with fifty of the king's sons by concubines to kill their father.
www.san.beck.org /EC6-Assyria.html   (14089 words)

  
 Solomon, King of Babylon   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Joan Oates writes in "Babylon" (p 88-9), "it is clear that by the time of Kara-indash Kassite Babylon had gained sufficient prestige to merit an exchange of ambassadors withe the Egyptian court, and that thenceforth the dispatch of highly-prized commodities as 'presents' between the two courts became common.
However, he was then ousted by an Assyrian king named Tiglath-Pileser I. Shortly thereafter, a new Babylonian king by the name of Nebuchadrezzar I went on the offensive and conquered the Elamite capital of Susa.
Nebuchadrezzar is not so easy, but given the new context is logically the assumed Babylonian name of Amenhotep III (Neb-maat-re).
www.domainofman.com /forum/index.cgi?noframes;read=555   (605 words)

  
 Book of Mormon Event Structure: The Ancient Near East - Maxwell Institute JBMS
It is unclear whether Jehoiakim died while Nebuchadrezzar II was en route to Hatti-land (Syro-Palestine) to control the rebellion, or was captured and fettered by him after his arrival (Jeremiah 22:19; 2 Kings 24:6; 2 Chronicles 36:6).
Nebuchadrezzar arrived with his army in Judah in Kislimu (late December 598/early January 597) of his seventh year—and immediately laid siege to Jerusalem.
II: The Interpretation of the Sanctuary at Risqeh," Archaeology 22/3 (1969): 195.
farms.byu.edu /display.php?id=126&table=jbms   (13432 words)

  
 King Psammetichus II (Psamtik II) of Egypt's 26th Dynasty
Psammetichus II's campaign, that was perhaps more peaceful then otherwise, though recorded as a traditional military campaign, encouraged Zedekiah to embark upon a rebellion that ultimately proved to be catastrophic for Jerusalem when the city fell in 587 BC.
At home, we also know that Psammetichus II made sure that Ankhnesneferibre (Neferibre lives for her), his daughter, by a Queet Takhut, was adopted by the Divine Adoratice Nitocris, who she eventually succeeded as Wife of Amun at Thebes in 584.
Psammetichus II is believed to have died in February of 589 BC, and was succeeded by his son, Apries.
www.touregypt.net /featurestories/psamtik2.htm   (856 words)

  
 Sumer: The Persian Conquest - Ancient Man and His First Civilizations
Nebuchadrezzar II's interest however, was in conquest and booty.
His policies, as well as those of the next king, his brother-in law, "Neriglissar" were the same as those of Nebuchadrezzar II, namely conquest and booty.
He made a defense treaty with Median king Astyages, as a defense against the Persians, who were becoming a growing threat under their king Cyrus II.
www.realhistoryww.com /world_history/ancient/sumer_Iraq_4a.htm   (760 words)

  
 AncientPath.net, Mason's Notes: Daniel Intro and Summary Outline
He was carried into Babylon by Nebuchadrezzar II (1:1), in the third year of Jehoiakim's reign by Babylonian reckoning (fourth year by Jewish reckoning).
Nebuchadrezzar II (or "nezzar") (605-562 BC), who reigned 43 years and was followed by his son
It will be observed that Daniel is concerned only with Nebuchadrezzar and Belshazzar, the first and the last kings of the first world-empire of the "head of gold," before introducing Cyrus and "Darius the Mede, " the leaders of the two-armed Medo-Persian empire.
www.ancientpath.net /Bible/PBU/Mason/27_Daniel/mason_daniel_intro.htm   (1438 words)

  
 Iraq: Welcome in my Blog
In the 6th century BC (586 BC), Nebuchadrezzar II conquered Judea (Judah), destroyed Jerusalem; Solomon's Temple was also destroyed; Nebuchadrezzar II carried away an estimated 15,000 captives, and sent most of its population into exile in Babylonia.
Nebuchadrezzar (604-562 BC) is credited for building the legendary Hanging Gardens of Babylon, one of the Seven Wonders of the World.
Various invaders conquered the land after Nebuchadrezzar's death, including Cyrus the Great in 539 BC and Alexander the Great in 331 BC, who died there in 323 BC.
marwa007.blogspot.com /2007/04/welcome-in-my-blog.html   (4672 words)

  
 The Chaldeans, Nebuchadrezzar And His Successors
II., son of Necho, in 589 B.C. threw himself vigorously into the cause of
Nebuchadrezzar was, in truth, a son of Babylonia, not of Assyria,
The instability of the dynasty of Nebuchadrezzar, in spite of his
history-world.org /chaldeansgodspeed2.htm   (3000 words)

  
 Chronicle Concerning the Early Years of Nebuchadnezzar II
The Chronicle Concerning the Early Years of Nebuchadnezzar II ("Jerusalem Chronicle"; ABC 5) is one of the historiographical texts from ancient Babylonia.
No less important is the description of Nebuchadnezzar's campaigns against the Egyptian king Necho II, who had tried to conquer Syria ('Hatti').
The Egyptian king Necho II tried to conquer Assyria's western provinces, which is sometimes called Hatti in this chronicle.
www.livius.org /cg-cm/chronicles/abc5/jerusalem.html   (1204 words)

  
 600s BC - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
609 BC — King Josiah of Judah dies in the Battle of Megiddo against Pharaoh Necho II of Egypt, who is on his way north to aid the rump Assyrian state of Ashur-uballit II.
609 BC — The Babylonians defeat the Assyrian army of Ashur-uballit II and capture Harran.
605 BC Battle of Carchemish: Crown Prince Nebuchadrezzar of Babylon defeats the army of Necho II of Egypt, securing the Babylonian conquest of Assyria.
www.knowledgehunter.info /wiki/600_BC   (362 words)

  
 On Nebuchadrezzar II
Nebuchadrezzar II 43 last year, Awel-Marduk accession year
Nebuchadrezzar II 44 last year, Awel-Marduk accession year
According to the Canon Basileion the termini of Neriglissar were, for his beginning of reign: spring
ourworld.compuserve.com /homepages/cplawassist/paper/20005.html   (0 words)

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