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Topic: Neo-Hittite


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In the News (Sun 16 Jun 19)

  
 Outline on the significant history r
Neo-Hittite (1200-700): After the collapse of the Hittite empire, the term "Hittite" continued to be used by the Assyrians and Hebrews to refer to the inhabitants of N. Syria.
Scholars are agreed that the Hittite Empire never extended into Palestine, and thus the Biblical "Hittites" of the Patriarchal narratives are not to be identified with the Hittites of Anatolia.
Migration of Hittites : In 1936 Forrer interpreted a Hittite inscription from the 14
www.homestead.com /danwagner/files/Hittites.htm

  
 The neo-Hittite states from c. 1180 to 700 BC (from Anatolia) --  Encyclopædia Britannica
Ancient Anatolia > Anatolia from the end of the Hittite Empire to the Achaemenian Period > The neo-Hittite states from c.
Hittite is known primarily from the approximately 25,000 cuneiform tablets or fragments of tablets preserved in the archives of Bogazköy (the ancient Hattusa, in modern Turkey), the majority of which are from the period of the Hittite empire...
system of pictographic writing used in the Syrian Hittite states for writing an eastern dialect of the Luwian language (q.v.) chiefly in the period from the 10th to the 8th century BC, after the fall of the Hittite empire.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-44354   (857 words)

  
 v1997.n070
L. Bachelot discussed three sealings from one of the Aramaic tablets discovered in the French-Italian excavations at Tell Shiyukh Fawqani (ancient Burmarina) in Syria, which have little or no parallels in their clear Neo-Hittite derivation, intriguing also for their late-7th century date.
E. Attardo gave an overview of the palaeography of the Aramaic argillary texts from Assyria, comparing shapes with monumental and cursive attestations from elsewhere: the pitfalls of palaeography for dating purposes, but also some guidelines for inner study of the development of writing, were analyzed.
A.R. Millard gave an opening outline of the Aramaic tablets on clay underscoring their contextual information and potential: dating, archival contexts, types of epigraphs, and the relationship with contemporary cuneiform material were analyzed.
oi.uchicago.edu /OI/ANE/ANE-DIGEST/1997/v1997.n070   (857 words)

  
 Hittites
We should note that he calls Akrugal’s “Hittite Empire” the “New Hittite Empire” but does not list any “Neo-Hittite” kings which were largely simply petty kingdoms in Syria and Cilicia.
Although Carchemish came to be viewed as the Western capital during the Neo-Hittite period, when it was captured by Sargon II in 717 B.C. the Hittites left the stage of history as a distinct political power.
The Hittites also honored the goddess Ashertush synonymous with the Canaanite fertility goddess Ashera, infamous in Scripture for the brutal and sensuous manner in which she was worshiped.
home.att.net /~kmpope/Hittites.html   (2456 words)

  
 Hittites
Although Carchemish came to be viewed as the Western capital during the Neo-Hittite period, when it was captured by Sargon II in 717 B.C. the Hittites left the stage of history as a distinct political power.
We should note that he calls Akrugal’s “Hittite Empire” the “New Hittite Empire” but does not list any “Neo-Hittite” kings which were largely simply petty kingdoms in Syria and Cilicia.
The Hittites also honored the goddess Ashertush synonymous with the Canaanite fertility goddess Ashera, infamous in Scripture for the brutal and sensuous manner in which she was worshiped.
home.att.net /~kmpope/Hittites.html   (2456 words)

  
 History of the Hittites - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
These Neo-Hittite Kingdoms were gradually conquered by the Assyrians, who conquered Carchemish during the reign of Sargon II in the late 8th century BC, and Milid several decades later.
The most notable Neo-Hittite kingdoms were those at Carchemish and Milid (near the later Melitene).
The early history of the Hittite kingdom is known through tablets that may first have been written in the 17th century BC but survived only as copies made in the 14th and 13th centuries BC.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/History_of_Hattians_and_Hittites   (1655 words)

  
 Outline on the significant history r
Neo-Hittite (1200-700): After the collapse of the Hittite empire, the term "Hittite" continued to be used by the Assyrians and Hebrews to refer to the inhabitants of N. Syria.
Scholars are agreed that the Hittite Empire never extended into Palestine, and thus the Biblical "Hittites" of the Patriarchal narratives are not to be identified with the Hittites of Anatolia.
The former names of kings and inscriptions in hieroglyphic Hittite were continued by kings of this region.
www.homestead.com /danwagner/files/Hittites.htm   (1655 words)

  
 Outline on the significant history r
Neo-Hittite (1200-700): After the collapse of the Hittite empire, the term "Hittite" continued to be used by the Assyrians and Hebrews to refer to the inhabitants of N. Syria.
Scholars are agreed that the Hittite Empire never extended into Palestine, and thus the Biblical "Hittites" of the Patriarchal narratives are not to be identified with the Hittites of Anatolia.
Migration of Hittites: In 1936 Forrer interpreted a Hittite inscription from the 14
www.homestead.com /danwagner/files/Hittites.htm   (1163 words)

  
 Outline on the significant history r
Neo-Hittite (1200-700): After the collapse of the Hittite empire, the term "Hittite" continued to be used by the Assyrians and Hebrews to refer to the inhabitants of N. Syria.
Migration of Hittites: In 1936 Forrer interpreted a Hittite inscription from the 14
Scholars are agreed that the Hittite Empire never extended into Palestine, and thus the Biblical "Hittites" of the Patriarchal narratives are not to be identified with the Hittites of Anatolia.
www.homestead.com /danwagner/files/Hittites.htm   (1163 words)

  
 Hittites on Encyclopedia.com
The neo-Hittite kingdom (c.1050-c.700 BC) was conquered by the Assyrians, who installed Hittite princes as vassals to their throne.
The Hittite Empire was a loose confederation that broke up under the invasions of the Thracians, Phrygians, and Assyrians c.1200 BC Several small states arose, with Carchemish becoming an outstanding city.
The Hittite Empire that followed the Old Kingdom, with its capital at Boğazköy (also called Hattusas), was the chief power and cultural force in W Asia from 1400 to 1200 BC The famous Hittite rulers date from this period.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/H/Hittites.asp   (723 words)

  
 Hittites on Encyclopedia.com
The neo-Hittite kingdom (c.1050-c.700 BC) was conquered by the Assyrians, who installed Hittite princes as vassals to their throne.
The Hittite Empire was a loose confederation that broke up under the invasions of the Thracians, Phrygians, and Assyrians c.1200 BC Several small states arose, with Carchemish becoming an outstanding city.
The Hittite Empire that followed the Old Kingdom, with its capital at Boğazköy (also called Hattusas), was the chief power and cultural force in W Asia from 1400 to 1200 BC The famous Hittite rulers date from this period.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/H/Hittites.asp   (723 words)

  
 Hittites on Encyclopedia.com
The neo-Hittite kingdom (c.1050-c.700 BC) was conquered by the Assyrians, who installed Hittite princes as vassals to their throne.
The Hittite Empire was a loose confederation that broke up under the invasions of the Thracians, Phrygians, and Assyrians c.1200 BC Several small states arose, with Carchemish becoming an outstanding city.
(hĬt´īts), ancient people of Asia Minor and Syria, who flourished from 1600 to 1200 BC The Hittites, a people of Indo-European connection, were supposed to have entered Cappadocia c.1800 BC To the southwest, in the Taurus and Cilicia, were the Luites, relatives of the Hittites; to the southeast, in the Upper Euphrates, the Hurrians (Khurrites).
www.encyclopedia.com /html/H/Hittites.asp   (723 words)

  
 Hittites on Encyclopedia.com
The neo-Hittite kingdom (c.1050-c.700 BC) was conquered by the Assyrians, who installed Hittite princes as vassals to their throne.
The Hittite Empire was a loose confederation that broke up under the invasions of the Thracians, Phrygians, and Assyrians c.1200 BC Several small states arose, with Carchemish becoming an outstanding city.
The Hittite Empire that followed the Old Kingdom, with its capital at Boğazköy (also called Hattusas), was the chief power and cultural force in W Asia from 1400 to 1200 BC The famous Hittite rulers date from this period.
www.encyclopedia.com /html/H/Hittites.asp   (723 words)

  
 Hittite_Synchronisms.html
And since, in the revised history, the Hittite king Suppiluliumas II followed Arnuwandas II, and ruled for several years, there should be no doubt that the neo-Hittite and Hittite kings by this name are in fact the same person.
We know from Hittite documents that a brother of Supiluliuma named Piyasili (in Hurrian - Sarre Kusuh), was appointed "king of Carchemish", perhaps as early as 885 B.C., the date when we assume the Hittites captured Carchemish, and from that base he acted as the major domo of North Syria, in command of the army.
KUB III 74 is a letter sent from a king Tudhaliyas to a king Tukulti-Ninurta, absent any indication as to which Tudhaliyas wrote the letter or which country the recipient ruled over.
www.kent.net /DisplacedDynasties/Hittite_Synchronisms.html   (723 words)

  
 Aleppo - by Carol Miller Syria Gate
Aleppo, happily, always resilient, and unlike the other neo-Hittite regimes, was able to endure, until the rise of Shalmaneser III, Assyrian king, the son and successor of Ashurnasirpal II, who by c.
As time passed, however, Aleppo began to recover, and to slowly evolve into one of the completely independent and unrelated neo-Hittite states -- that included Ain Dara and Tell Halaf as well as Halab -- while gradually developing a viable culture of considerable worth, until the catastrophic invasion of the "Sea Peoples" c.
And so life continued in Aleppo, even to the extent of once again attracting pilgrims to the city, until Saif al-Dawlah provoked, taunted and finally enraged the Byzantines into reasserting their authority in the region.
www.syriagate.com /Syria/about/cities/Aleppo/aleppo-cm.htm   (723 words)

  
 Aleppo - by Carol Miller Syria Gate
Aleppo, happily, always resilient, and unlike the other neo-Hittite regimes, was able to endure, until the rise of Shalmaneser III, Assyrian king, the son and successor of Ashurnasirpal II, who by c.
As time passed, however, Aleppo began to recover, and to slowly evolve into one of the completely independent and unrelated neo-Hittite states -- that included Ain Dara and Tell Halaf as well as Halab -- while gradually developing a viable culture of considerable worth, until the catastrophic invasion of the "Sea Peoples" c.
No king before or since has left such an abundance of documentation, in the way of royal inscriptions and officially prescribed annals summarizing his campaigns in order of the years of his long and active reign.
www.syriagate.com /Syria/about/cities/Aleppo/aleppo-cm.htm   (723 words)

  
 Aleppo - by Carol Miller Syria Gate
As time passed, however, Aleppo began to recover, and to slowly evolve into one of the completely independent and unrelated neo-Hittite states -- that included Ain Dara and Tell Halaf as well as Halab -- while gradually developing a viable culture of considerable worth, until the catastrophic invasion of the "Sea Peoples" c.
Aleppo, happily, always resilient, and unlike the other neo-Hittite regimes, was able to endure, until the rise of Shalmaneser III, Assyrian king, the son and successor of Ashurnasirpal II, who by c.
Aleppo was already known and envied in the Third Millennium, according to the cuneiform tablets unearthed in the Ebla archives, that describe the commercial and military proficiency of the Syrian "Armi", homonym of a city, probably contemporary, in the Indus Valley.
www.syriagate.com /Syria/about/cities/Aleppo/aleppo-cm.htm   (723 words)

  
 CHAPTER 1
Yet around the middle of the 9th century BC., and contemporary with the rise of the early Neo-Assyrian kingdom, Hittite culture and civilisation experienced a spectacular rebirth in the city-states of northern Syria.
century BC.) and that of the Neo-Assyrians (supposedly commencing in the 9
Gueterbock for example insisted that the gold objects were indeed of Hittite Empire age, and held that they must, notwithstanding Woolley’s objections, have been heirlooms.
www.consciousevolution.com /Rennes/ramessideschapter2.htm   (723 words)

  
 The Stratigraphy of the 19th Dynasty in Asia Minor
A 600-year gap was left, however, between the 13th century Hittite empire and the Neo-Babylonian/Persian period.
Thus, were it not for the synchronism to Ramses II of the 13th century, the final stage of the Hittite empire would be dated to the 7th century.
In the 19th century, archaeologists found Hittite sculpture in Boghazkoi.
www.ldolphin.org /19thdynasty.html   (1447 words)

  
 Bryn Mawr Classical Review 1999.04.18
A few minor polities in Syria which their neighbors referred to collectively as "Great Hatti" continued a number of Hittite traditions -- particularly in art -- into the eighth century BCE, and distant echoes of these "neo-Hittite" successors may be found in the Hebrew Bible (e.g., 2 Kings 7:6).
Not only was Hatti -- as the Hittites referred to their realm -- geographically the nearest ancient state to the Greek world, but its administrative language is the earliest-attested member of the Indo-European family, and thus akin to the Greek and Latin with which students of the Classics are themselves directly concerned.
Of the many civilizations of the ancient Near East, the one which is perhaps of greatest interest for Classicists is the empire of the Hittites, which dominated central Asia Minor and much of northern Syria during the seventeenth through the twelfth centuries BCE.
ccat.sas.upenn.edu /bmcr/1999/1999-04-18.html   (1447 words)

  
 B 29 Further Resources
This imperial line ruling in Carchemish is well documented almost until the end of the Empire period, after which there is a gap until the 10th century BC when Assyrian texts reveal Carchemish as a thriving Neo-Hittite kingdom
Around 1325 BC (conventional date) the Hittite emperor Suppiluliumas I conquered Carchemish on the Euphrates, and from then until the collapse of the Empire Carchemish was the base from which a branch of the Hittite royal family ruled Syria.
Inscriptions suggest that the kings of the Suhis dynasty, who bore the title 'Lord of the Country of Carchemish', were contemporary with another line whose shadowy rulers claimed the higher status of 'Great King', a title borne by kings of Carchemish and Hattu_a in the Empire period.
www.grovebooks.co.uk /resources/B29-Resources.html   (3954 words)

  
 Jerablus (Ancient Carchemish)
Though Carchemish has a very long history (it is mentioned in the Ebla texts of the 3rd millennium BC), it is as a part of the Hittite Empire of the Late Bronze Age and a 'Neo-Hittite' city of the Iron Age that it is most widely associated.
The great city of Carchemish was one of the most important in the Hittite Empire, during the Late Bronze Age.
Carchemish is mentioned in both the Ebla and Mari archives of the third and second millennia BC, and it was an important centre in the mid-second millennium kingdom of Mittani.
www.pef.org.uk /EarlySyriaPages/Carchemish.htm   (303 words)

  
 v01.n067
Middle and Neo-Assyrian kings traced their origins back to an otherwise unknown king Adasi who took the throne during a period of turmoil around 1690 B.C. The last king of this dynasty is Assur-uballit II, who disappears from history with the fall of Harran in 609 B.C. This means the dynasty lasted around 1080 years.
And since some passages seem to indicate that Tudhaliya's father was king, this dynasty is probably descended from the Old Hittite dynasty consisting of at least 11 more generations.
Not even in the running, but still rather long is the Hittite dynasty of Tudhaliya II lasting some 13 generations if one continues the counting through their decendants, the kings of Kargamish and Malatya.
oi.uchicago.edu /OI/ANE/ANE-DIGEST/V01/v01.n067   (303 words)

  
 Carchemish
After the Hittite empire fell to the Sea Peoples, Carchemish continued to be the capital of an important "Neo-Hittite" kingdom in the Iron Age, and important trade center.
In the 9th century BC, the city paid tribute to Kings Ashurnasirpal II and Shalmaneser III of Assyria, and was conquered by Sargon II in 717 BC, in the reign of King Pisiris.
In the summer of 605 BC (or 607 BC by some sources), an important battle was fought there by the Babylon ian army of Nebuchadrezzar II and that of Pharaoh Necho of Egypt (Jer.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Carchemish.html   (666 words)

  
 Hittite_Synchronisms.html
It is surely more than coincidence that the reigns of these two neo-Hittite kings by the name Suppiluliumas lie in the identical time frame that we have assigned to their Hittite counterparts in the revised chronology.
The records of Ramesses III tell how the isles were disturbed and the Hittites with other peoples fled into Syria in a great invasion which, in conjunction with the 'Peoples of the Sea', menaced Egypt...
Suppiluliuma might already be ill. Sickness has no doubt depleted the strength of the army.
www.kent.net /DisplacedDynasties/Hittite_Synchronisms.html   (666 words)

  
 [No title]
Neo-Hittite and post-Hittite States of Anatolia Elburz Mountains(Tepe Hissar) Kurdistan(Hasanlu, Jaftavan Tepe, Takht-i Suleiman, Ziwiyeh
school.pressian.com /dictionary/college_15.htm   (666 words)

  
 Egyptian New Kingdom, Babylonia, Assyria, Hittites, etc.
Although the Kingdom of the Hittites in central Anatolia was wiped out by the obscure migrations of the 12th century, small Hittite (nor "Neo-Hittite") states continued in Northern Syria, to which references to the Hittites in the Bible refer.
Ironically, it was the Hittites who then brought to an end the Kingdom of the Mitanni, which may have been ruled by a noble elite with Indo-Aryan affinities, speaking or influenced by another Indo-European language from the same family as Persian and Sanskrit, and who worshiped gods obviously identical to those of the Vedas.
The New Kingdom is known with an intimacy that is missing from much of the rest of Egyptian history.
www.friesian.com /notes/newking.htm   (7966 words)

  
 tourist_info
The political separation of Turkey and Syria has brought a severing of much of Aleppos natural economic hinterland to the north.The small hill on which the citadel of Aleppo is located is a natural feature utilized as far back as the Amorite federation under Yamkhad before the Hittite conquest in the 16th century BC.
The small hill on which the citadel is located is a natural feature utilized as far back as the Amorite federation under Yamkhad before the Hittite conquest in the 16th century BC.
The Amorite kingdom of Yamkhad, central pf Aleppo, controlled many of the cities and towns in Northern Syria at the beginning of Syria but at the in1800 BC it was subject to pressures from the east from Mitanni and, eventually, the overall supremacy of the Hittites.
sahab-travel.com /tourist_info   (7966 words)

  
 Muhammad Shamsaddin Megalommatis - Buzzle Author
History of Religions and Mythology (Ancient Hittite religions and myths: Ullikummi, Illuyankas, Telipinus; other Ancient Anatolian religious and mythological systems: Hatti, Luwian, Urartu, Neo-Hittite, Phrygian, Lydian, Carian, Lycian, Cappadocian) PHIL 202.
History of Religions and Mythology (Ancient Sumerian, Elamite, Assyrian and Babylonian religions and myths: Enuma Elish, Adapa, Gilgamesh, Etana, the Flood, Ishtar’s Descent to the Nether World, etc) PHIL 201.
History of Religions and Mythology (the Evil in Ancient Oriental Religions, Cults, Mythologies and Philosophies) LIT 101.
www.buzzle.com /authors.asp?author=973   (7966 words)

  
 ANTALYA / TURKEY
At the Karatepe National Park, (the neo-Hittite site), the remains of the summerresidence of King Asitawada, tablets bearing Hittite and Phoencian inscriptions and an open -air museum with fine bas- reliefs reveal the importance and astonishing aesthetic of this pre-historic civilization.
This region was much fought over during the Crusades and the impressive fortress at Toprakkale was for a time held by the Christian armies.
www.turkiye-online.com /travel/mediterranean/tarsus-antakya2.html   (7966 words)

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