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Topic: Neologism


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In the News (Sun 16 Jun 19)

  
  Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Neologism
Neologisms are especially useful in identifying inventions, new phenomena, or old ideas which have taken on a new cultural context.
Neologisms are by definition "new", and as such are often directly attributable to a specific individual, publication, period or event.
Some neologisms, especially those dealing with sensitive subjects, are often objected to on the grounds that they obscure the issue being discussed, and that such a word's novelty often leads a discussion away from the root issue and onto a sidetrack about the meaning of the neologism itself.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Neologism   (1372 words)

  
  Neologism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Neologisms are especially useful in identifying inventions, new phenomena, or old ideas which have taken on a new cultural context.
Neologisms are by definition "new", and as such are often directly attributable to a specific individual, publication, period or event.
Some neologisms, especially those dealing with sensitive subjects, are often objected to on the grounds that they obscure the issue being discussed, and that such a word's novelty often leads a discussion away from the root issue and onto a sidetrack about the meaning of the neologism itself.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Neologism   (1230 words)

  
 Neologisms. Fowler, H. W. 1908. The King's English
Among other arts and sciences, that of lexicography happens to have found convenient a neologism that may here be used to help in the very slight classification required for the new words we are more concerned with—that is, those whose object is literary or general, and not scientific.
A 'nonce-word' (and the use might be extended to 'nonce-phrase' and 'nonce-sense'—the latter not necessarily, though it may be sometimes, equivalent to nonsense) is one that is constructed to serve a need of the moment.
But there are other neologisms of a very different kind, which come into existence as the crystallization of a political tendency or a movement in ideas.
www.bartleby.com /116/103.html   (1543 words)

  
 Neologism
Neologisms are especially useful in identifying new inventions, new phenomena, or old ideas which have taken on a new cultural context.
Neologisms can also be created through abbreviation, acronym (such as laser), by intentionally rhyming with existing words, or simply through playing with sounds.
A recent example of a neologism is the word dot-com, denoting a company that relies on the internet for most or all of its business, which arose due to the frequency of businesses including ".com" in their company name.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ne/Neologism.html   (517 words)

  
 Neologism - Wikinfo
In linguistics, a neologism is a recently-coined word, or the act of inventing a word or phrase.
Neologisms tend to occur more often in cultures which are rapidly changing, and also in situations where there is easy and fast propagation of information.
In psychology, a neologism is a word invented by a person suffering from psychotic disorders; psychiatrists sometimes use these neologisms, which often have meaning only to the subject, as clues to determine the nature of the subject's disorder.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Neologism   (3151 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Neologism
NEOLOGISM Concise Oxford Companion to the English Language...
NEOLOGISM, A new WORD or sense of a word and the coining or use of new words and senses.
Most neologisms in English belong in the following categories: (1) Compounding: couch potato, someone constantly slumped on a couch watching television: video-conferencing, a number of people taking part in a...
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=Neologism   (655 words)

  
 Wordwizard Clubhouse - nonce lexeme vs. neologism   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
The word popularizing was a relative neologism (the Review boasted five years later, "Why should we be afraid of introducing new words into the language which it is our mission to spread over a new world?").
Neologism seems to imply more permanency (well, except for the psychiatric sense); it's the creation of a new term that may or may not have staying power and be considered an old term in 100 years.
A nonce lexeme may well refer to words made up for a particular occasion that are never intended to find their way into general use (such as a play on someone's name used in a roast or a tribute).
www.wordwizard.com /ch_forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=4234   (589 words)

  
 Neologism - WebArticles.com
A neologism is word, term, or phrase which has been recently created ("coined") —often to apply to new concepts, or to reshape older terms in newer language form.
A neologist is a person who develops a neologism and neology is the act (or science) of introducing a neologism into a language.
Neologisms often become popular by way of mass media, the Internet, or word of mouth (see also Wiktionary's Neologisms:unstable or Protologism pages for a wiki venue of popularizing newly coined words) — especially, many linguists suspect, by younger people.
www.webarticles.com /print.php?id=211   (1145 words)

  
 Neologism   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
A person who develops a neologism is sometimes called a neologist; neology is the act of introducing a new word into a language.
Neologisms tend to occur more often in cultures which are rapidly changing, and also in situations where there is easy and fast propagation of information.
Trademarks are often neologisms to ensure they are distinguished from other brands.
dks.thing.net /Neologism.html   (1001 words)

  
 Neologisms   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
A neologism is the term used to describe a word that has been made-up or invented by a speaker, which appears in a transcript of spontaneous speech dialogue.
It can also be described as a word which does not appear in the dictionary of the primary spoken language, but which is also not a foreign word.
A neologism may be a slang word that has yet to find its way into mainstream conversation, or it may be the creation of a non-native speaker who has made for example a grammatical error.
www.is.cs.cmu.edu /trl_conventions/neologisms.html   (140 words)

  
 Excite España - Búsqueda Web - Resultados con: Neologism
A neologism (pronounced nee-AH-low-djism) is a newly invented word or term.
A neologism is the term used to describe a word that has been made-up or invented by a speaker, which appears in a transcript of spontaneous...
Neologism Besides the centuries-old instinctive use of andquot;theirandquot;, people have been formally concerned about the gendered pronoun...
www.excite.es /search/web/results?q=Neologism   (195 words)

  
 More on Neologisms
In linguistics, a neologism refers to a recently created (or coined) word, phrase or usage which can sometimes be attributed to a specific individual, publication, period or event.
A neologist is a person who develops a neologism and neology is the act of introducing a neologism into a language.
Neologisms often become popular by way of mass media, the Internet, or word of mouth (see also Wiktionary's Neologisms:unstable or Protologism pages for a wiki venue of popularizing newly coined words) — especially, many linguists suspect, by younger people.
www.artilifes.com /neologisms.htm   (1240 words)

  
 Neologism   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
Neologisms are especially useful in identifying new inventions, new phenomena, or old ideas which have taken on a new cultural context.
A person who develops a neologism is sometimes called a neologist; neology is the act of introducing a new word into a language.
This is an easily pinpointed example of how a new idea can quickly become a new word, or neologism, usually based on a void in the then-current language or a need to expedite the expression of an idea which is gaining popularity.
www.jahsonic.com /Neologism.html   (599 words)

  
 Excite España - Búsqueda De Mp3 - Resultados con: Neologism
Neologism A private, unshared meaning of a word or term.
Neologisms are frequently characteristic of the language of schizophrenic individuals.
Podcasting a Screencast about an Umlaut Today we have a great new word that is both a neologism because you won't find it in a dictionary and it is a portmanteau because it is a combination of two other words.
www.excite.es /search/mp3/results?q=Neologism   (213 words)

  
 D.C. LeBlanc: Neologism in Fae Myenne Ng's Bone
On one hand, this Chinese English neologism is a powerful linguistic act of syncresis and renaming through which Leila articulates her unwillingness to privilege either her Chinese or American identity or to break identity into clean-sheared roles that define one's place in culture and, by extension, one's self and power within that culture.
The neologism suggests self-affirmation that transcends a compromise of patriarchal signifiers through new language specific to a Chinese American woman at a given moment when she has no other language to express her experience.
Ng's use of the bicultural neologism "backdaire," mimicking the "updaire" sign in Salmon Alley, suggests her awareness that although Leila may accept difference by facing dualism, living with it still poses obstacles within the mundane and the spiritual.
rmmla.wsu.edu /old/54.1/articles/leblanc.html   (4769 words)

  
 neologism - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Discontent: He spoke with a certain…, Flirtation: I assisted at the birth…, Neologisms: We have decided to call the entire field of…, Optimism:...
Neologisms: We have decided to call the entire field of…
We have decided to call the entire field of control and communication theory, whether in the machine or in the animal, by the name of Cybernetics,...
encarta.msn.com /neologism.html   (141 words)

  
 Avoid Neologisms
Relying on neologism may make you less eager to go to the effort of explaining your idea; you may subconsciously believe that the neologism is so catchy and self-explanatory that you have simply to repeat a few times and everyone else will come around to your way of thinking.
Neologisms are usually created because of the need for greater semantic precision.
Therefore if I acknowledge his authority in the field (I'll look for a reference) and take his words to be true, it follows that neologisms are either used in the wrong place (their meaning doesn't fit in the context) or their use is perfectly justified and we can't replace them with other words.
c2.com /cgi/wiki?AvoidNeologisms   (2089 words)

  
 Urban Dictionary: neologism
neologism george bush log neo nuclear nukular portmanteau slang dictionary anime country accent dubya floetry fucktard fugly haterade ism manga new new word phobia pokemon uneducated urbandictionary w word
A Neologism in the sense of a new word would be, for instance, Chumbling.
Pardon my apparent neologisms, they are colloquial terms I learned from my father.
www.urbandictionary.com /define.php?term=neologism   (388 words)

  
 Nonce-word Pragmatics - Louis Cabri
To distinguish between neologism and nonce-word raises the role definitions have in establishing the ideality of the word as a linguistic (and cultural) unit.
The neologism recruits, with every new dictionary addition, for the word as such – which here must be understood as itself having an instrumental function that might not have been perceived by modernist poets who claimed the word-as-such as a poetic liberation from instrumentality.
Unlike a neologism that in certain respects fulfills a linguistic need which therefore must be officially declared and instituted, a nonce-word slips into linguistic usage for the most part unnoticed, without apparent need.
www.monoecious.org /cabri-nonce.html   (1306 words)

  
 Igor | My Favorite Word Is Neologism
Evan Morris, the word detective who's been writing about words and language on the web since 1995, is writing a new book called My Favorite Word and he wants to know what's yours.
At Wordlab, we've always been partial to the word neologism, for reasons that should be apparent to our regular readers.
What's not so obvious, and frequently asked, is why we don't define neologisms.
www.igorinternational.com /blog/2005/07/my-favorite-word-is-neologism   (233 words)

  
 Neologism Cliche Aphorism and Novel Language Form
This page provides several thousand novel clichés and neologisms, speech figures derived principally from the various poetic forms relevant to the UK usage of the English language - although there is inevitably overlap with the forms adopted by the overseas cousins.
Once a neologism is used enough, it in turn becomes cliche or mass media.
This may mean learning a few of the forms by heart if oral use is intended (but the learning is easy owing to general structure and familiarity of the underlying forms, which act as familiar 'carriers' for the overlayed neologisms).
www.angelfire.com /nd/danscorpio/word4.html   (956 words)

  
 neologism - General Practice Notebook   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-05)
A neologism is a word or phrase invented by an individual.
The use of a neologism does not necessarily indicate a thought disorder.
The examiner must write a putative neologism down once the patient has said it and then ask the patient what that word means.
www.gpnotebook.co.uk /cache/436600843.htm   (125 words)

  
 neologism - a definition from Whatis.com
Neologisms would seem to occur at a greater rate in cultures with rapidly changing technologies and with greater means for information dispersal.
A neology is, according to our Webster's, the use of a new word or the use of an existing word but given a new meaning.
A second meaning given by Webster's for neologism is that of "a meaningless word coined by a psychotic."
whatis.techtarget.com /definition/0,,sid9_gci212629,00.html   (129 words)

  
 IULA (UPF) - Observatori de Neologia. Sample Record
[4] Type of neologism: indication of procedure involved in the creation of the neologism; the typology in use includes formal processes (suffixation, prefixation, compounding, classical or learned compounding, etc.), semantic processes, syntactic processes and loans.
The record card used to collect information from the press is the same as the basic record card; records used to collect data from oral and "spontaneous" texts add specific information fields according to the nature of the source.
Phonetic transcription: phonetic transcription of the neologism, in its lemma form, which is compulsory for some types of neologism (compounding and loans).
www.iula.upf.es /obneo/fitxauk.htm   (453 words)

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