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Topic: Neoptera


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  Neoptera
The "lower Neoptera" include the Plecoptera, Embidiina, Zoraptera, and the "orthopteroid" orders (all the remaining living orders shown in the tree above).
Neuroanatomy and neurochemistry: implications for the phylogeny of the lower Neoptera.
Dermaptera hindwing structure and folding: New evidence for familial, ordinal and superordinal relationships within Neoptera (Insecta).
tolweb.org /Neoptera/8267   (841 words)

  
  Neoptera   (Site not responding. Last check: )
We mentioned in the earlier page (Class Insecta) that the subclass neoptera evolved the ability to fold their wings over their body, thus achieving a survival advantage.
A further advance that occurred among the neoptera was the attainment of complete metamorphosis.
This resulted in the superorder holometabola, the larvae of which are highly specialized, occupying one ecological niche, while when they transfigure themselves to completely different adult forms they occupy another ecological niche.
www.cogsci.indiana.edu /farg/harry/bio/zoo/neoptera.htm   (162 words)

  
 Insect - New World Encyclopedia Preview
More advanced flyers, which make up the Neoptera, in general, have wings that can be folded over their back, keeping them out of the way when not in use.
The Neoptera infraclass (which in some taxonomies is a superorder) includes insects that can fly and that can flex their wings over their abdomens.
The Exopterygota part of the Neoptera are sometimes divided into Orthopteroida (cerci present) and Hemipteroida (cerci absent), also called lower and higher Exopterygota.
www.newworldencyclopedia.org /preview/Insect   (3951 words)

  
 Neoptera   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Neoptera is a classification group that includes almost all the winged insects, specifically those that can flex their wings over their abdomens (in contrast to Paleoptera).
This was in contrast with the more ancient orders of winged insects, which are unable to flex their wings in this way.
ITIS treats Neoptera as a superorder ; other authorities treat it, as here, as in infraclass, and recognise several superorders within it.
www.serebella.com /encyclopedia/article-Neoptera.html   (170 words)

  
 Survival of Species :: Web-based multiplayer turn game
The Humans are a species from planet Earth looking to control and secure space, proving for once and for all they are the dominant species of the universe.
The Neoptera are a highly aggressive insect species from an unknown planet.
Their motives are unknown, but their methods are violence and war.
www.sofs.us   (0 words)

  
 Kansas School Naturalist: Checklist of Kansas Damselflies
Over ninety-nine percent of the insect species that have been described by scientists are placed in a group (Infraclass) called the Neoptera.
Damselflies and dragonflies belong to a smaller group, the Palaeoptera, which lack the added hinge which allows the Neoptera to fold their wings flat.
The ability of the Neoptera to fold their wings flat allowed them to radiate into many different habitats that the Palaeoptera were unable to use because of their protruding wings.
www.emporia.edu /ksn/v44n1-march1998/note.htm   (434 words)

  
 Aligned 18S and Insect Phylogeny - Science - RedOrbit   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Ephemeroptera are supported as the sister taxon of Neoptera, and this result is interpreted with respect to the evolution of direct sperm transfer and the evolution of flight.
Ephemeroptera (mayflies) are recovered as the sister taxon to Neoptera (insects with a unique wing folding mechanism characteristic of most insect orders) with high support (Fig.
Ephemeroptera (mayflies) as the sister taxon to Neoptera offers an interesting scenario in the role of direct sperm transfer in the evolution of winged insects.
www.redorbit.com /news/science/74035/aligned_18s_and_insect_phylogeny/index.html   (5751 words)

  
 Neoptera
The "lower Neoptera" include the Plecoptera, Embidiina, Zoraptera, and the "orthopteroid" orders (all the remaining living orders shown in the tree above).
Neuroanatomy and neurochemistry: implications for the phylogeny of the lower Neoptera.
Most Paleozoic Protorthoptera are ancestral hemipteroids: major wing braces as clues to a new phylogeny of Neoptera (Insecta).
www.tolweb.org /tree?group=Neoptera&contgroup=Pterygota   (841 words)

  
 [No title]
It is only through their evident relationship with particular groups of winged insects (lice are closely related to psocids [book lice]; fleas are related to flies) that it is clear that their ancestors had wings.
The largest of these is the clade Neoptera ("new wing").
Remaining insects (all of the taxa in the above tree except for Neoptera) are sometimes refered to as Paleoptera ("old wing"), because they lack the sophisticated wing-folding mechanism of neopterous insects.
ag.arizona.edu /tree/eukaryotes/animals/arthropoda/hexapoda/!Pterygota.nex   (522 words)

  
 Neoptera Dermaptera Orthoptera grasshopper Mantophasmatodea lice Hymenoptera bee wasp superorder infraclass   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Neoptera Dermaptera Orthoptera grasshopper Mantophasmatodea lice Hymenoptera bee wasp superorder infraclass
ITIS treats Neoptera as a superorder; other authorities treat it, as here, as in infraclass, and recognise several superorders within it.
Today Neoptera is divided into the superorders Exopterygota and Endopterygota.
en.powerwissen.com /Mbpk66FtEKnydGK3Gp6i2Q%3D%3D_Neoptera.html   (180 words)

  
 Insect flight Information   (Site not responding. Last check: )
This mechanism evolved once, and is the defining feature (synapomorphy) for the infraclass Neoptera; it corresponds, probably not coincidentally, with the appearance of a wing-folding mechanism, which allows Neopteran insects to fold the wings back over the abdomen when at rest (though this ability has been lost secondarily in some groups, such as all butterflies).
What all Neoptera share, though, is the way the muscles in the thorax work: the muscles, rather than attaching to the wings, attach to the thorax and deform it; since the wings are extensions of the thoracic exoskeleton, the deformations of the thorax cause the wings to move, as well.
The overall effect is that many higher Neoptera can hover, fly backwards, and perform other feats involving a degree of fine control that insects with direct flight muscles cannot achieve.
www.bookrags.com /wiki/Insect_flight   (2672 words)

  
 Insect
In primitive insects it tends to rely heavily on direct flight muscles, which act upon the wing.
More advanced flyers, which make up the Neoptera, generally have wings which can fold over their back, keeping them out of the way when not in use.
In these, the wings are powered mainly by indirect flight muscles, which move them by stressing the thorax.
www.black-science.org /wikipedia/i/in/insect.html   (647 words)

  
 Neoptera at AllExperts
Neoptera is a classification group that includes almost all the winged insects, specifically those that can flex their wings over their abdomens (in contrast to Paleoptera).
This was in contrast with the more ancient orders of winged insects, which are unable to flex their wings in this way.
ITIS treats Neoptera as a superorder; other authorities treat it, as here, as an infraclass, and recognise several superorders within it.
en.allexperts.com /e/n/ne/neoptera.htm   (213 words)

  
 Exopterygota   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Exopterygota, also known as Hemipterodea, are a superorder of insects of the subclass Pterygota in the infraclass Neoptera, in which the young resemble adults but have externally-developing wings.
Also Ephemeroptera (mayflies) and Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies) have gradual wing development, but these two orders belongs to the paraphyletic infraclass Paleoptera, which is not included in Neoptera.
They are distinguished from the Endopterygota (or Holometabola) by the way in which their wings develop.
www.dejavu.org /cgi-bin/get.cgi?ver=93&url=http%3A%2F%2Farticles.gourt.com%2F%3Farticle%3DExopterygota%26type%3Den   (232 words)

  
 Entomology Courses Temp.   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Recognition of Apterygota and Paleoptera; characters and methods of study.
Recognition of Neoptera (Exopterygota): characters and methods of study.
Recognition of Neoptera (Endopterygota): characters and methods of study.
entomology.wsu.edu /courses/entom439.html   (104 words)

  
 Order Plecoptera
The Plecoptera (stoneflies), all of which are aquatic as nymphs, are considered to be the most primitive order of living Neoptera.
Nymphs feed on fresh or decayed vegetable matter, but may be carnivorous in later instars.
The order Plecoptera belongs to the infraclass Neoptera because stoneflies' wings fold over their backs at rest.
lakes.chebucto.org /ZOOBENTH/BENTHOS/v.html   (833 words)

  
 Insect - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article
In more primitive insects it tends to rely heavily on direct flight muscles, which act upon the wing structure.
More advanced flyers, which make up the Neoptera, generally have wings that can be folded over their back, keeping them out of the way when not in use.
In these insects, the wings are powered mainly by indirect flight muscles that move the wings by stressing the thorax wall.
www.startsurfing.com /encyclopedia/i/n/s/Insect.html   (1998 words)

  
 Neoptera   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Neoptera is a classification group that includes almost all the winged insects, specifically those that can flex their wings over their abdomens (in contrast toPaleoptera).
This was in contrast with the more ancient orders of winged insects, which are unable to flex theirwings in this way.
ITIS treats Neoptera as a superorder ;other authorities treat it, as here, as in infraclass, and recognise severalsuperorders within it.
www.therfcc.org /neoptera-45546.html   (95 words)

  
 INSECTS
The exopterygote part of the Neoptera are sometimes divided into Orthopteroida (cerci present) and Hemipteroida (cerci absent), also called lower and higher Exopterygota.
The more advanced groups making up the Neoptera have foldable wings and their muscles act on the thorax wall and power the wings indirectly.
It is even possible that the Thysanura itself are not monophyletic, making the family Lepidotrichidae a sister group to the Dicondylia (Pterygota + the rest of the Thysanura).
www.solarnavigator.net /animal_kingdom/insects.htm   (3433 words)

  
 Palaeos Invertebrates: Arthropoda: Insecta: Diaphanopterodea
The main veins were closely aligned in the basal part of the wing.
As with the neoptera, these insects were able to fold their wings back over the top of their abdomen, but the mechanism of folding is not clear.
They constitute a separate neopterous development that is unrelated to the true Neoptera.
www.palaeos.com /Invertebrates/Arthropods/Insecta/Diaphanopterodea.html   (206 words)

  
 Genstyle Companion Database Browser   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Eukaryota Metazoa Arthropoda Hexapoda Insecta Pterygota Neoptera Endopterygota Lepidoptera Glossata Ditrysia Yponomeutoidea Plutellidae Acrolepiopsis
Eukaryota Metazoa Arthropoda Hexapoda Insecta Pterygota Neoptera Endopterygota Lepidoptera Glossata Ditrysia Bombycoidea Lasiocampidae Dendrolimus
Eukaryota Metazoa Arthropoda Hexapoda Insecta Pterygota Neoptera Endopterygota Lepidoptera Glossata Ditrysia Papilionoidea Lycaenidae Theclinae Japonica
genstyle.imed.jussieu.fr /affichage_esp.php?cherche=Glossata   (747 words)

  
 NEW DATA ON PALEOZOIC GRYLLOBLATTID INSECTS (NEOPTERA) Journal of Paleontology - Find Articles
However, the monophyly of this last group is still not demonstrated.
Nevertheless, the resolution of the phylogenetie relationships of the various members of this group is of crucial importance for the general resolution of the phylogeny of the Polyneoptera (Plecoptera, orthopteroid orders, dictyopteroid orders, and others) and basal Neoptera, which are still very controversial (compare Grimaldi, 2001; Wheeler et al., 2001; Rasnitsyn, 2002a).
In order to achieve such an analysis, it is necessary to improve our knowledge of the systematics and primary homology of the wing venation of the representatives of the Grylloblattida.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_qa3790/is_200501/ai_n9468318   (680 words)

  
 Insect Morphology
In most living insects (the Neoptera), there are three axillary sclerites that articulate with various parts of the wing.
In the Neoptera, a muscle on the third axillary causes it to pivot about the posterior notal wing process and thereby to fold the wing over the back of the insect.
Most modern insects of the Neoptera are able to fold their wings over the body.
www.entomology.umn.edu /cues/4015/morpology   (3121 words)

  
 Wellington Formation
Proportion of Wellington Formation entomofauna Neoptera and Palaeoptera subgroups unique to or shared between the Elmo, Kansas and Midco, Oklahoma localities, illustrating that the greater percentage of unique fauna at Elmo arises from the Neoptera.
The data are grouped into Apterygota, Pterygota: Palaeoptera and Pterygota: Neoptera sections, with the taxa arranged in each section in order of decreasing species diversity.
It is especially important for the Midco Neoptera to be thoroughly reviewed, as there is currently no published, comprehensive survey of the Midco species.
www.windsofkansas.com /wellington.html   (5376 words)

  
 Insect - Glasgledius   (Site not responding. Last check: )
In primitive insects it tends to rely heavily on direct flight muscles, which act upon the wing.
More advanced flyers, which make up the Neoptera[?], generally have wings which can fold over their back, keeping them out of the way when not in use.
In these, the wings are powered mainly by indirect flight muscles, which move them by stressing the thorax.
www.glasglow.com /E2/in/Insect.html   (359 words)

  
 Praying Mantis - Cirrus Digital Imaging
Class Insecta / Subclass Pterygota / Infraclass Neoptera / Order Dictyoptera / Suborder Mantodea / Family Mantidae -- mantids
This mantis is commonly known as the Chinese mantis.
We accept all major credit cards and can email your purchases same day.
www.cirrusimage.com /mantidae_praying_mantis.htm   (0 words)

  
 Systematics of the Uniramia 2
The Neoptera contains most of the diversity of the insects -- that is to say, most of the diversity of the animals on this planet.
Three of the groups shown on this page, the Coleoptera (beetles), Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths), and Hymenoptera (ants, bees, and wasps), together account for about half of all known animal species -- and new species of these and other insect groups are being discovered almost every day.
Also, check out the Neoptera pages of the Neoptera pages on the Tree of Life at the University of Arizona.
www.ucmp.berkeley.edu /arthropoda/uniramia/uniramiasy2.html   (0 words)

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