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Topic: Niccolò Machiavelli


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In the News (Sun 16 Jun 19)

  
 Machiavelli
Machiavelli's insistence on the practicality of his political advice is most evident in his consideration of the personality, character, and conduct of the successful ruler.
Although he shared with other humanists a profound pessimism about human nature, Machiavelli nevertheless argued that the social benefits of stability and security can be achieved even in the face of moral corruption.
Among the most widely-read of the Renaissance thinkers was Niccolò Machiavelli, a Florentine politician who retired from public service to write at length on the skill required for successfully running the state.
www.philosophypages.com /hy/3v.htm

  
 Machiavelli
Allowing for the unpredictable influence of fortune, Machiavelli argued that it is primarily the character or vitality or skill of the individual leader that determines the success of any state.
Here, too, however, Machiavelli's conception of the proper application of morality to practical political life is one that judges the skill of all participants in terms of the efficacy with which they achieve noble ends.
In 1498, Niccolò Machiavelli began his career as an active politician in the independent city-state of Florence, engaging in diplomatic missions through France and Germany as well as Italy.
www.philosophypages.com /ph/macv.htm

  
 Machiavelli
Machiavelli's insistence on the practicality of his political advice is most evident in his consideration of the personality, character, and conduct of the successful ruler.
Although he shared with other humanists a profound pessimism about human nature, Machiavelli nevertheless argued that the social benefits of stability and security can be achieved even in the face of moral corruption.
Among the most widely-read of the Renaissance thinkers was Niccolò Machiavelli, a Florentine politician who retired from public service to write at length on the skill required for successfully running the state.
www.philosophypages.com /hy/3v.htm

  
 Machiavelli
Allowing for the unpredictable influence of fortune, Machiavelli argued that it is primarily the character or vitality or skill of the individual leader that determines the success of any state.
Here, too, however, Machiavelli's conception of the proper application of morality to practical political life is one that judges the skill of all participants in terms of the efficacy with which they achieve noble ends.
In 1498, Niccolò Machiavelli began his career as an active politician in the independent city-state of Florence, engaging in diplomatic missions through France and Germany as well as Italy.
www.philosophypages.com /ph/macv.htm   (395 words)

  
 Machiavelli, Niccolo: Art of War
Machiavelli scholar Christopher Lynch offers a sensitive and entirely new translation of the Art of War, faithful to the original but rendered in modern, idiomatic English.
Lynch's fluid translation helps readers appreciate anew Machiavelli's brilliant treatments of the relationships between war and politics, civilians and the military, and technology and tactics.
Niccolò Machiavelli's Art of War is one of the world's great classics of military and political theory.
www.press.uchicago.edu /cgi-bin/hfs.cgi/00/15655.ctl   (395 words)

  
 Machiavelli, Art of War, excerpt
"Christopher Lynch's new translation of Machiavelli's Art of War is a much-needed corrective to existing translations and to the less than rigorous analysis of this historically important text by previous commentators.
"Christopher Lynch has made the best and the first careful translation of Machiavelli's Art of War.
Copyright notice: Adapted from Art of War by Niccolò Machiavelli, published by the University of Chicago Press.
www.press.uchicago.edu /Misc/Chicago/500403.html   (395 words)

  
 Notes: Chapter 10
Speaking of "your Barbera," Francesco Guicciardini wrote Niccolò the following year that "I know of no greater favor I could do you than to treat as she merits the woman who is your heart's delight." Francesco Guicciardini to Niccolò Machiavelli, 7 August 1525, in Atkinson and Sices, Machiavelli and His Friends, #294, p.
His description of the coup: NM to a Noblewoman, after September 16, 1512, Machiavelli and His Friends, #203, pp.
Francesco del Nero has gotten here [to Florence], and as for the goods that we taken, he had nothing else but letters from the great captain to the signory of Venice and to the doge...
www.dartmouth.edu /~rmasters/fourtune/notes/10.html   (7046 words)

  
 Notes: Chapter 8
Though the Signoria: It will be remembered that Niccolò had been present in Sinigaglia when Cesare seized and killed his previously rebellious condottiere on December 31, 1502 (see Machiavelli, The Prince, ch.
Gilbert suggests this was composed before the overthrow of the government in 1512, whereas Ridolfi follows those who claim it was just a "joke" (Machiavelli, pp.
"Notable man": Francesco Soderini (in Rome) to NM, October 26, 1504, Machiavelli and His Friends, #94, pp.
www.dartmouth.edu /~rmasters/fourtune/notes/08.html   (7046 words)

  
 Untitled Page
Machiavelli, The Mandrake root Acts I and II - From Maurizio Viroli, Niccolò’s Smile, chapt 17: "The comedy of life," pp.171-181.
Finally, we will study how the new political ideas reflect on Machiavelli’s very entertaining play The Mandrake Root and on Guicciardini’s History of Italy (selections).
In answering this question we will focus on Machiavelli’s Prince and Discourses on the First Decade of Livy (selections), and Guicciardini’s Maxims and Reflections and Considerations of the Discourses of Niccoló Machiavelli.
darkwing.uoregon.edu /~maxiloll/pages/Machiavelli.html   (861 words)

  
 Notes: Chapter 4
For indications that Niccolò's network of friends was not primarily based on the Soderini, especially at the outset of his career, see Black, "Machiavelli, servant of the Florentine republic," pp.
There seem to be fewer overlaps between Machiavelli's co-workers and friends and either Piero or Giovanettorio Soderini, although Tommaso di Pagolantonio Soderini is associated with the Casavecchia family as well as Leonardo Guidotti.
His strong support for Piero Soderini as Gonfalonier for life, to which we will turn below, suggests he was hardly a supporter of the Medici at this time.
www.dartmouth.edu /~rmasters/fourtune/notes/04.html   (861 words)

  
 macchia-3
Machiavelli's best known works are DISCORSI SOPRA LA PRIMA DECA DI TITO LIVIO (1531) and IL PRINCIPE (1532), whose the main theme is that all means may be used in order to maintain authority, and that the worst acts of the ruler are justified by the treachery of the government.
Many of Machiavelli's thoughts, as "it is much more secure to be feared, than to be loved" have lived centuries as slogans.
Machiavelli died in Florence on June 21, 1527.
www.erzwiss.uni-hamburg.de /comenius/Material/06/Macchiavelli/1.html   (861 words)

  
 Balanced Government: Niccolò Machiavelli, Discourses on the First Ten Books of Titus Livius, bk. 1, CH. 2 1531 (posthumous)
Balanced Government: Niccolò Machiavelli, Discourses on the First Ten Books of Titus Livius, bk.
Niccolò Machiavelli, Discourses on the First Ten Books of Titus Livius, bk.
It was then that the Tribunes of the people were created, which strengthened and confirmed the republic, being now composed of the three elements of which we have spoken above.
press-pubs.uchicago.edu /founders/documents/v1ch11s1.html   (1708 words)

  
 Balanced Government: Niccolò Machiavelli, Discourses on the First Ten Books of Titus Livius, bk. 1, CH. 2 1531 (posthumous)
Balanced Government: Niccolò Machiavelli, Discourses on the First Ten Books of Titus Livius, bk.
Niccolò Machiavelli, Discourses on the First Ten Books of Titus Livius, bk.
It was then that the Tribunes of the people were created, which strengthened and confirmed the republic, being now composed of the three elements of which we have spoken above.
press-pubs.uchicago.edu /founders/documents/v1ch11s1.html   (1708 words)

  
 Fortune is a River
Niccolò Machiavelli, as an administrator responsible for Florentine military and foreign policy, tried to implement the first phase of this project in 1503-4 in order to divert the river from Pisa, deprive the city of water, and thereby win a war that had frustrated his fellow citizens for a decade.
Niccolò Machiavelli, whose The Prince has been blamed for immorality and praised for introducing a science of politics, is one of our best-known political thinkers.
Rivers are means of transportation and energy, sources of water for crops as well as people--and when they flood, devastating in their destruction.
www.dartmouth.edu /~rmasters/fourtune   (1794 words)

  
 Notes: Chapter 5
Machiavelli wrote a detailed account of this famous double-cross: "A Description of the Method Used by Duke Valentino in Killing Vitellozzo Vitelli, Oliverotto da Fermo, and Others," in Allan Gilbert, trans., Chief Works of Machiavelli, 3 vols.
Machiavelli himself described the events in detail in A Description of the Method Used by Duke Valentino in Killing Vitellozzo Vitelli, Oliverotto da Fermo, and Others, in NM, Chief Works, ed.
Despite the understatement in The Prince, Niccolò witnessed at first hand the "elimination" of the condottieri in Sinigaglia just as he had been present at the "spectacle" of Remirro del Orco in Cesena.
www.dartmouth.edu /~rmasters/fourtune/notes/05.html   (1794 words)

  
 University of Notre Dame : Film, Television, and Theatre : Mainstage : The Mandrake
Niccolò Machiavelli is better known as a political writer than as a playwright, but at one time in his career he was celebrated for a beautifully constructed comedy.
Machiavelli's shrewd plot construction and enterprising characters capture the brilliance and cynicism of early 16th-century Italy in this lively and bawdy comedy.
Notre Dame Film, Television, and Theatre (FTT) will present Machiavelli's hilarious play The Mandrake Wednesday, October 9, through Sunday, October 13, at Washington Hall on the Notre Dame campus.
www.nd.edu /~ftt/main_mandrake.shtml   (372 words)

  
 Publisher description for Library of Congress control number 97044320
Peter Godman presents the first intellectual history of Florentine humanism from the lifetime of Angelo Poliziano in the later fifteenth century to the death of Niccolò Machiavelli in 1527.
From Poliziano to Machiavelli adds new depth to the intellectual history of Florence during this most dynamic period in its history.
The book concludes with an appendix, drawn from previously inaccessible archives, about the censorship of Machiavelli by the Inquisition and the Index.
www.loc.gov /catdir/description/prin021/97044320.html   (292 words)

  
 Nicolò Machiavelli. Bibliografia 1987-2000
Di Rienzo Enzo, Morellet, Machiavelli e la rivoluzione: aspetti del dibattito su proprietà e subsistances nel periodo rivoluzionario, in atti del Convegno internazionale sulla rivoluzione francese: Pavia 1988, Extr.
Giordano Giuliana, relatore Claudio Bonvecchio Niccolò Machiavelli, la concezione dello Stato, Trieste, Università degli studi, (Tesi di laurea in Storia delle dottrine politiche).
Prezzolini Giuseppe, Vita di Nicolò Machiavelli Fiorentino, Milano, Rusconi libri, (Biografie, 19).
www.filosofia.unina.it /longocioffi/machiavel.html   (292 words)

  
 Undergraduate - Second Year Units
This adaptation is well illustrated in Machiavelli’s Il Principe and Discorsi, and Castiglione’s Il libro del cortegiano.
The following is a convenient edition that contains both works studied for this course: Niccolò Machiavelli, Il principe e Discorsi sopra la prima deca di Tito Livio, ed.
You must use an edition with good, ample notes that explain Machiavelli’s terminology and references to persons and events.
www.ucl.ac.uk /italian/pages/undersecond.html   (292 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Italian Literature
In prose, Niccolò Machiavelli (1469-1527) and, in poetry Lodovico Ariosto (1474-1533), are the master spirits of the age.
Between Ariosto's earlier and later comedies come the "Calandria" of Bernardo da Bibbiena (1513) and the "Mandragola" of Machiavelli (after 1512), both in prose; the latter is a work of real dramatic power, but cynical and immoral to the last degree.
Machiavelli's political and historical works, admirable in clarity, brevity, and efficacy of expression, penetrating in insight, and at times noble in patriotic aspiration, are open to severe condemnation as virtually excluding moral considerations from the sphere of public life.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/08245a.htm   (5894 words)

  
 Syllabus Ital 400a
Lettura facoltativa: Machiavelli, Guicciardini, Pietro Bembo, Castiglione, Giovanni Della Casa, Giorgio Vasari, Matteo Bandello, Pietro Aretino (pag.
Nov 21, 26 Prosa del Cinquecento: Niccolò Machiavelli, Francesco Guicciardini, Baldesar Castiglione, Benvenuto Cellini (pag.
Oct 8, 10 Francesco Petrarca: I, XXXV, LXI, LXII, XC, CLXXXIX, CCCX, CCCXI, CCCLXV (pag.
www.coh.arizona.edu /Ital/it400a/syllabus.html   (1011 words)

  
 Cesare Borgia
Patricide and the plot of 'The Prince': Cesare Borgia and Machiavelli's Italy.
Cesare has long been considered the model of the Renaissance prince, the prototype of Niccolò Machiavelli's
Borgia, Cesare or Caesar, 1476–1507, Italian soldier and politician, younger son of Pope
www.infoplease.com /ce6/people/A0808360.html   (467 words)

  
 Books The Battle of San Romano, Paolo Uccello (c1435-60)
Subject: The Battle of San Romano, a Florentine victory over Sienna in 1432, was one of the combats that Florentine politician and thinker Niccolò Machiavelli denounced as piddling affairs, fought not between citizen armies but by proxy, with hired armies led by mercenary captains such as Niccolò da Tolentino, leader of the victorious Florentine force.
The three-metre-wide painting in tempera on poplar is one of a series of panels depicting the Battle of San Romano; the other two are in the Louvre and Uffizi.
Da Tolentino is at the heart of this painting, on his white horse, wearing his extraordinary patterned turban, under his banner of the Knot of Solomon.
books.guardian.co.uk /print/0,3858,4634861-110738,00.html   (467 words)

  
 Godman, P.: From Poliziano to Machiavelli: Florentine Humanism in the High Renaissance.
Peter Godman presents the first intellectual history of Florentine humanism from the lifetime of Angelo Poliziano in the later fifteenth century to the death of Niccolò Machiavelli in 1527.
The book concludes with an appendix, drawn from previously inaccessible archives, about the censorship of Machiavelli by the Inquisition and the Index.
But he also demonstrates that Florentine humanists shared a common culture, marked by a preference for secular over religious themes and by constant anxiety about surviving and prospering in the city's dangerous political climate.
pup.princeton.edu /titles/6320.html   (467 words)

  
 MOTWM
These recent events add to the material Machiavelli is collecting for his book on government.
But by 1516 it was clear that Florence would remain in the hands of the Medici and Machiavelli concluded that he had no other choice.
This insight gives him unique understanding of the situation for Florence and now he will have to argue with his fellow governors in Florence to try to convince them that Florence is no longer the power that she was before 1494 and the fall of the Medici.
www.westernmind.com /machiavelli/machiavellibio.shtml   (3341 words)

  
 Lingua italiana - La miglior difesa è l'attacco
Niccolò Machiavelli, Discorsi sopra la prima deca di Tito Livio, a cura di Corrado Vivanti, Einaudi Tascabili.
Torna in edizione tascabile il commento puntuale di Machiavelli all’opera di Tito Livio, opera che - come osserva Chabod - sembra concentrare tutta «la cognizione delle antique e moderne cose».
La Libreria di Dora ha pensato di mettere a confronto i due manifesti e invitare i lettori a una lettura comparata.
www.italialibri.net /arretratis/novita0900.html   (3341 words)

  
 Amazon.co.uk: Books: The Art of War
Voltaire said, "Machiavelli taught Europe the art of war; it had long been practiced, without being known." For Niccol Machiavelli (1469-1527), war was war, and victory the supreme aim to which all other considerations must be subordinated.
Modern critics, in spite of the original success of the book, have pointed out the wrong perception that Macchiavelli had about the growing importance of artillery and the role of military reforms that were enacted in France at the time.
Some of these were involved, in 1522, in a conspiracy to kill Cardinal Giulio de'Medici,Master of Florence.
www.amazon.co.uk /exec/obidos/ASIN/030681076X   (3341 words)

  
 The Music of War
Cavalry trumpets, Machiavelli suggested, ought to have a distinctly different timbre, so that their calls would not be mistaken for those pertaining to the infantry.
In his 1521 treatise Libro della arte della guerra (The Art of War), Niccoló Machiavelli wrote that the commanding officer should issue orders by means of the trumpet because its piercing tone and great volume enabled it to be heard above the pandemonium of combat.
The function of music in war has always been twofold: as a means of communication and as a psychological weapon.
www.thehistorynet.com /mh/blmusixofwar   (1153 words)

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