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Topic: Non-sexist language


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In the News (Sun 21 Apr 19)

  
 5. Gender. The American Heritage Book of English Usage. 1996
Sexist stereotypes, such as the assumption that all nurses are women or that all executives are men, can seem like the status quo—the way the world “is”—especially when you are distracted by a deadline or concerned about some other feature of your writing, such as its organization or its tone.
And unlike other political language reforms, which tend to be limited to individual names for ethnic groups, gender reforms involve basic grammatical components like pronouns, basic grammatical rules like pronoun agreement, and basic words like man, father, male and female.
Finally, it is important to remember that avoiding sexist terms and constructions is no guarantee that what you have written will be free of gender bias.
www.bartleby.com /64/5.html   (690 words)

  
 Sexism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Another example is gender-neutral language — the avoidance of gender-specific job titles, non-parallel usage, and other usage that is felt by some to be sexist.
Sexist beliefs are a species of essentialism, which holds that individuals can be understood (and often judged) based on the characteristics of the group to which they belong—in this case, their sex group (male or female).
It has been argued that language plays a part in sexism, though it is disputed whether certain language causes sexism or sexism causes certain language (see the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Sexism   (553 words)

  
 Gender-neutral language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Gender-neutral language (gender-generic, gender-inclusive, non-sexist, or sex-neutral language) is language that attempts to refer neither to males nor females when discussing an abstract or hypothetical person whose sex cannot otherwise be determined.
The various forms of the Chinese language are remarkably gender-neutral due to its underlying structure, and possesses few linguistic markers of gender, even though Chinese society has historically been shown to have significant degree of male dominance in the social structure as well as education and written literature.
In languages where the gender of a noun also affects the formation of other words in a sentence, such as gender-defined adjectives, pronouns, or verbs, this can lead to repetitive or complicated sentences if both terms are used, as the sentence must essentially be repeated twice.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Non-sexist_language   (6726 words)

  
 Against the Theory of "Sexist Language"
Such defensiveness accompanies the widely held conviction that the theory of "sexist language" and the program to institute "gender neutral" language are absolutely fundamental to the social and political project of feminism.
The theory of "sexist language," however, is no credit to feminism, for it is deeply flawed both in its understanding of the nature of language and in its understanding of how languages change over time.
Even if we think that English "man" is "sexist," Aristotle was, of course, not speaking English.
www.friesian.com /language.htm   (2938 words)

  
 Peterssen
It was a sexist principle encoded in the language by males and which today exerts a considerable influence over thought and reality by preserving the categories of male and minus male.
One aspect that changes is the perception of sexist language.
Language too is a medium of representation, and not surprisingly the sexism of many conventional usages was challenged by feminists early on.
www.lawsite.ca /WLSC/Petersson_w.htm   (5505 words)

  
 Sexist Langauge: Compelementary Solutions in Spanish and English
This paper will show that while the solutions used in the two languages are, due to linguistic constraints, quite different, the solutions are complementary; that is, while English speakers have coined non-gender-specific language where sexist terms exist, Spanish speakers have coined gendered terminology where none has existed before.
Sexist language in both English and Spanish is perhaps most evident in the use of third person pronouns and terms that identify individuals by occupation.
Sexist language in English is most evident in the use of third person pronouns and terms that identify individuals by occupation.
faculty.weber.edu /tmathews/articles/majlp.htm   (3275 words)

  
 Non-Sexist Language Policy
Nonsexist language is written, verbal or nonverbal communication that is inclusive and does not reflect a bias based on sex.
Language that ignores, limits, or trivializes women and girls, and language that excludes or belittles women's values, perspectives, and experiences is sexist, as would be comparable language related to men and boys.
Language is sexist if it discriminates because of one's sex; reinforces the idea of one sex's superiority; or perpetuates sex and gender role stereotypes.
www.umaine.edu /wic/both/language.htm   (297 words)

  
 Canadian Broadcast Standards Council
Examples of non sexist language are the use of occupational titles such as “fire fighter” instead of “fireman” and avoiding the exclusive use of masculine words in making general references, e.g.
Non sexist language shall be used whenever possible.
Non Sexist Language is language that does not exclude one sex or give inequitable treatment on the basis of gender.
www.cbsc.ca /english/codes/sexrole/sexrole.htm   (2517 words)

  
 Linguistic Sexism in Business Writing Textbooks
While publishers may be “acutely aware of sexist language” and, in many cases, have developed their own in-house guidelines for avoiding such language, authors and publishers of business writing textbooks, on the whole, are not providing comprehensive instruction for avoiding sexist language.
Sex-biased language is still a problem in our culture; thus, it is necessary to sensitize students to the problems of sexist language and to provide in-depth instruction in using language so they do not arbitrarily stereotype or delimit the potential of either sex.
Only seven of the fourteen texts mention sexist language in the end-of-chapter problems, ranging from a few discussion questions to a limited number of sentences or memos that students are asked to rewrite to eliminate sexist language.
jac.gsu.edu /jac/8/Articles/7.htm   (3981 words)

  
 Publications: Guidelines for Non-Sexist Use of Language
For several reasons we, as philosophers, should be particularly sensitive to the issue of nonsexist language--that is, language whose "use creates, constitutes, promotes, or exploits an unfair or irrelevant distinction between the sexes" (Mary Vetterling-Braggin, 1981, p.3).
Some empirical data on sexist language indicate that if women are not specifically included (e.g., through using females in examples, or the term "he or she"), even genuinely gender-neutral prose (e.g., using plural pronouns) tends to be heard as referring to males only.
Topics include: the definition of sexism and sexist language; the moral significance of using sexist language; the generic 'he' and 'man'; 'Ms.'; a comparison of sexist and racist language.
www.apa.udel.edu /apa/publications/texts/nonsexist.html   (2677 words)

  
 Hamilton College - Writing Center - Alternatives to Sexist Language
Another way to erase sexist language is to substitute a noun subject instead of a pronoun.
Sexist language can creep into a sentence in many different ways.
The change in person does not alter the meaning of either of the sentences; it merely erases the sexist language.
www.hamilton.edu /academics/resource/wc/AlternToSexistLang.html   (1274 words)

  
 The Writing Center at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
If you write with nonsexist language, you write to represent with fairness the gender identified in many words.
Concern about the use of sexist language is part of our increased awareness that the perceived meanings of some words have changed in response to the changing roles of men and women in our society.
Our language and society reflect one another, so it is important for us as communicators to recognize and respect change in the meaning and acceptability of words.
www.rpi.edu /dept/llc/writecenter/web/genderfair.html   (846 words)

  
 ch.ch : the public administration on-line: Gender-sensitive language - non-sexist language
Acting on this fact, the authorities have resolved to encourage the use of non-sexist language as much as possible to take into account women's place, status and role in society.
The gender equality office of Canton Jura has issued a French-speaking guidebook for the use of non-sexist language in administrative and legislative texts.
ch.ch : the public administration on-line: Gender-sensitive language - non-sexist language
www.ch.ch /urn:ch:en:ch:ch.02.12.03.13:01   (173 words)

  
 Non-Sexist Language
In the language used in acts of Parliament, the new law said, "words importing the masculine gender shall be deemed and taken to include females." Although similar language in contracts and other legal documents subsequently helped reinforce this grammatical edict in all English-speaking countries, it was often conveniently ignored.
The practice of assigning masculine gender to neutral terms comes from the fact that every language reflects the prejudices of the society in which it evolved, and English evolved through most of its history in a male-centered, patriarchal society.
The first grammars of modern English were written in the 16th and 17th centuries.
www.stetson.edu /artsci/history/nongenderlang.html   (1819 words)

  
 LEO Gender-free Writing
Therefore, gender free language is a requirement of the workplace and the university.
If your language is free of bias, it should offend no one; ideally, no one should even notice that you have made an effort to reduce sexually biased words and phrases." [1]
It may be easy to avoid gender-biased nouns by replacing sexist nouns with more neutral ones: chairman with chair, mailman with paper carrier, and congressman with senator or representative.
leo.stcloudstate.edu /style/genderbias.html   (636 words)

  
 Anti-Sexist Language
Sexist language, apart from being offensive, may also mislead the reader, since it is frequently ambiguous.
These guidelines are intended to assist members of our Women's Studies classes in avoiding sexist language by sensitizing people to some of the forms it takes and by suggesting anti-sexist alternatives.
Such careful, anti-sexist use of language helps in avoiding the mistake of referring to, e.g., 'managers and their wives'.
www.ucc.uconn.edu /~wwwwmst/language.html   (581 words)

  
 Diana Hacker: Language Debates: Sexist language
In addition, feminists argued that sexist language has a powerful negative impact on women: It makes women invisible, reinforces stereotypical gender roles, and limits women’s opportunities and even their aspirations.
During the early years of the women’s movement, sexist language was a hotly debated topic.
Many people, both men and women, now find sexist language offensive.
www.dianahacker.com /writersref/subpages_language/sexist.html   (200 words)

  
 Anti Sexist Language
In health and social care settings it is important ot avoid discrimination by using non sexist language.
In this exercise you have to match the non sexist term on the right with the sexist term on the left.
As you complete the exercise consider why the sexist term might be thought sexist
www.educationforum.co.uk /nonsexist.htm   (188 words)

  
 ReadWriteThink Lesson Plan: Avoiding Sexist Language by Using Gender-Fair Pronouns
Distribute information on the use of gender-fair language such as the Purdue OWL's handout on non-sexist language, or point students' attention to similar information in their texts.
These guidelines, by NCTE's Women in Literacy and Life Assembly (WILLA), outline preferred gender-fair usage as well as how teachers can work with students to encourage them to avoid sexist language.
As we use language to communicate with one another, we also reveal much about the ways that we think and view; for what we know is revealed in the ways that we talk about the world around us.
www.readwritethink.org /lessons/lesson_view.asp?id=201   (1166 words)

  
 April 2002 eDebate Archives: Re: [eDebate] re:sexist language
it seems less relevant that you believe or not in "the theory" of sexist language, but more a question of whether you're ignorant enought to believe that sexist language (or any other language which, when used, reifies systemic oppression) doesn't HURT people and can't be easily avoided.
of sexist language occurs "ignorant" (ie not-knowing) of the fact that it really hurts
>What if we don't happen to believe in the theory of sexist language and i attempt to >defend my use of gendered pronouns?
www.ndtceda.com /archives/200204/0452.html   (414 words)

  
 O p e n W i k i - Sexist Language
"Sexist Language" has absolutely nothing to do with pornography.
"Sexist Language" has nothing to do with anything X-rated.
The term refers to language that is biased by gender, such as when people use "mankind" to mean both men and women.
www.openwiki.com /ow.asp?SexistLanguage   (82 words)

  
 Sheila Gibbons on Sexist Language
Apparently sexist language is out, but rhetorical chicanery is definitely in.
Gibbons is also unhappy that post-9/11, the words "lawman" and "fireman saw a resurgence as well as the fact that even 30 years after attention was first brought to sexist language, people still talk about "manning battle stations" or talk about the achievements of "mankind."
Sheila Gibbons wrote a piece of commentary for Women's E-News about that pressing problem facing women -- the rise of sexist language in the media.
www.equityfeminism.com /articles/2003/000015.html   (418 words)

  
 Non-sexist language-2 - Deccan Herald - Internet Edition
Proponents of non-sexist language wish to see all suggestion of any ‘male superiority’ (as they see it) removed.
Many women writers themselves, as Burchfield has noted, have blithely ignored the suggestions of their shrill feminist sisters and gone on merrily using the old, abhorrent sexist forms.
But then the very structure of Indian language has distinct masculine and feminine forms (in verbs even).
www.deccanherald.com /deccanherald/jun232005/dheducation1031222005622.asp   (746 words)

  
 Talk:Gender-neutral language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The "non-sexist language" article should remain, and it should: (1) list these 6 constructs that some people object to (2) link to all of them, as well as "gender-neutral language" and (3) make clear that not everyone agrees that such language is sexist.
Simply writing non-sexist language in that form presupposes the validity of one side of the argument, which by definition is POV.
I've replaced "sexist language" with "more traditional language," and I've made "gender neutral language" the first term used, as it is both a more neutral descriptive term (no so much embodied allegation or argument) and, at least judging from the number of Google hits, it appears to be the more common term.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Talk:Non-sexist_language   (746 words)

  
 Guidelines for the Use of Non-sexist Language
Nonsexist language, on the other hand, far from being a form of censorship, is a conscious choice on the part of staff to address and include the whole of their audience.
Sexist language is language which, consciously or unconsciously, alienates female or male students, and may also hinder their learning.
(c) Preserve the language and meaning of original texts, even if they use sexist language.
www.otago.ac.nz /personnelservices/Policies/NonSexistLangGuide.html   (746 words)

  
 CONK! Encyclopedia: Language
It is a compilation of various elements of different languages, and it is intended to be an easy-to-learn language.
For example, the boundaries between named language groups are in effect arbitrary due to blending between populations (the dialect continuum).
While the term animal languages is widely used, most researchers agree that they are not as complex or expressive as human language; a more accurate term is animal communication.
www.conk.com /search/encyclopedia.cgi?q=Language   (746 words)

  
 Avoid Sexist Language
Here are some tips for avoiding common mistakes regarding sexist language.
Why avoid sexist language in your business writing?
The use of a masculine pronoun to refer to both genders is offensive to many people.
www.enursescribe.com /avoidsexist.htm   (551 words)

  
 Sexist Language
As a conscientious writer, I try my best to avoid sexist language.
Thankfully, we've also eliminated many sexist job titles, recognizing that most jobs are being filled by both men and women.
For example, I would never write a sentence like this: "An experienced shopper tries not to fill his cart with unnecessary stuff." After all, many shoppers are female.
www.absolutewrite.com /freelance_writing/sexist_language.htm   (632 words)

  
 Guidelines For Non-Sexist Use of Language
For several reasons we, as philosophers, should be particularly sensitive to the issue of nonsexist language--that is, language whose "use creates, constitutes, promotes, or exploits an unfair or irrelevant distinction between the sexes" (Mary Vetterling-Braggin, 1981, p.3).
Some empirical data on sexist language indicate that if women are not specifically included (e.g., through using females in examples, or the term "he or she"), even genuinely gender-neutral prose (e.g., using plural pronouns) tends to be heard as referring to males only.
Topics include: the definition of sexism and sexist language; the moral significance of using sexist language; the generic 'he' and 'man'; 'Ms.'; a comparison of sexist and racist language.
www.engl.niu.edu /freshman_english/nonsexist.html   (632 words)

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