Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Norman Malcolm


Related Topics

  
  Ceilidh Culture >> History
Malcolm was the son of Duncan I. When King of Scotland, Duncan had initiated two campaigns simultaneously, one, commanded by his nephew Moddan against the Earl of Orkney on Scotland's northern border, the other led by himself against the Northumbrians.
One of Duncan's sons, Malcolm Canmor was taken to the court of Edward the Confessor in England.
Malcolm had been accompanied by friends from the South, Malcolm's son, the future David I was also raised in England, and when he came to claim the crown, he was accompanied by nearly 1, 000 Norman adventurers.
www.ceilidhculture.com /history.htm   (2865 words)

  
  Norman Malcolm Summary
Norman Malcolm, one of America's best-known philosophers, was born in Selden, Kansas, in 1911.
Malcolm's published work deals especially with the nature of necessary truth; empirical certainty; the connections between common sense, ordinary language, and philosophy; knowledge and perception; and such topics in the philosophy of mind as memory, dreaming, and the problem of other minds.
Malcolm remained one of Wittgenstein's closest friends, and his memoir of his time with Wittgenstein, published in 1958, is widely acclaimed as one of the most captivating and most accurate portraits of Wittgenstein's remarkable personality.
www.bookrags.com /Norman_Malcolm   (988 words)

  
  Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal
Norman Malcolm (1911 – 1990) was an American philosopher.
Malcolm remained one of Wittgenstein's closest friends, and his memoir of his time with Wittgenstein, published in 1958, is widely acclaimed as one of the most captivating and most accurate portraits of Wittgenstein's remarkable personality.
Malcolm wasn't a defender of scepticism but found Moore's rebuttal of it to be sorely lacking in clarity and ineffective as a whole.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Norman_Malcolm   (414 words)

  
  2. Scotland. 2001. The Encyclopedia of World History
Malcolm was forced to do homage, by William the Conqueror (1072) and by William Rufus (1091), and Anglo-Norman penetration began.
Malcolm's wife, (St.) Margaret (sister of Edgar Aetheling, grandniece of Edward the Confessor), was a masterful and remarkable woman whose Anglicizing influence on Scottish culture and the native Church was profound.
DAVID I continued the so-called bloodless Norman conquest, and the new Anglo-Norman aristocracy (Baliols, Bruces, Lindsays, Fitz Alans—that is, Stewarts) became the bulwark of the crown.
www.bartleby.com /67/447.html   (338 words)

  
 History of the Monarchy > Early Scottish monarchs > Malcolm III
Malcolm Canmore ('great head' or 'chief') was the eldest son of Duncan I. After his father's death, he found refuge in England with his uncle Siward of Northumbria, where he stayed for more than 14 years.
Malcolm was determined to extend his kingdom southwards and take advantage of the upheaval caused by the Norman Conquest.
Three times defeated, Malcolm was forced under the treaty of Abernethy in 1072 to become 'the man' of the English king and give up his son Duncan as a hostage.
www.royal.gov.uk /output/Page98.asp   (345 words)

  
 Norman Malcolm
Be the first to add a related person to Norman Malcolm's search result.
Be the first to add news to Norman Malcolm's search result by typing into the box above.
Norman Malcolm (1911 - 1990) was an American philosopher.
www.spock.com /Norman-Malcolm   (125 words)

  
 Norman Malcolm   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Norman Malcolm (1911 – 1990) is an American philosopher.
During his first term at Cambridge in 1938, he met Ludwig Wittgenstein and attended Wittgenstein's lectures on the philosophical foundations of mathematics throughout 1939.
Malcolm remained one of Wittgenstein's closest friends, and his memoir of his time with Wittgenstein, published in 1958, is widely acclaimed as one of the most captivating and most accurate portraits of Wittgenstein's remarkable personality.
www.wikimoz.org /wiki/en/wikipedia/n/no/norman_malcolm.html   (183 words)

  
 Riviste - Paolo Tripodi, Sogni, "grammatica" e scienza naturale
Malcolm's conceptual analysis is strongly influenced by Wittgenstein, but it has its starting point in the skeptical problem of distinguishing between dream and reality.
Malcolm claims that what determines when dreams occur during sleep is nothing but “grammar”, and that such a grammar does not tell us the precise time when a sleeper dreams.
It also suggests that Putnam's criticisms were unneeded, since Malcolm simply misdescribed the ordinary concept of dreaming, according to which, in fact, we do have chance to determine the temporal occurrence of dreams during sleep; this is enough to make the empirical correlation supposed by scientists possible.
www.mulino.it /rivisteweb/scheda_articolo.php?id_articolo=16648   (200 words)

  
 Amazon.co.uk: Ludwig Wittgenstein: A Memoir: Books: Norman Malcolm   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Norman Malcolm was a close friend of Ludwig Wittgenstein's.
Norman Malcolm does not discuss Wittgenstein's philosophical works - although he attended a respectable number of his lectures - but describes the philosopher in his daily life, his tastes, his talks with his fellows in Cambridge.
Malcolm often experienced that Wittgenstein had a tendency to be suspicious of motives and character.
www.amazon.co.uk /Ludwig-Wittgenstein-Memoir-Norman-Malcolm/dp/0199247595   (910 words)

  
 gladwell dot com - the art of failure
Norman was paired with Faldo, and the two hit their first shots well.
Norman watched, stone-faced, as the ball rolled thirty yards back down the hill, and with that error something inside of him broke.
And he was bound by the particular etiquette of choking, the understanding that what he had earned was something less than a victory and what Norman had suffered was something less than a defeat.
www.gladwell.com /2000/2000_08_21_a_choking.htm   (4704 words)

  
 Sports History | Staffordshire | Malcolm Henson | Team Sports, Class and Community in the 19th & 20th Century   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Interviews with two of his surviving son's Lesley and Norman describe how their father was originally a Blacksmith for the Great Western Railway but his excellent long-hand resulted in him being called to the office to keep the books when the regular clerk was absent.
The sons were all good sportsmen and Norman has the distinction of being flown from Bristol to Cardiff in the 1920s as a reserve to play rugby for England, unfortunately when he arrived he was overlooked for someone else ; a cruel twist of fate.
Norman and Lesley Matthews are currently resident in the Bathampton area and take an active interest in local rugby.
www.staffs.ac.uk /schools/humanities_and_soc_sciences/pgstudents/rugby/matthews.htm   (211 words)

  
 malcolm x - history - central - British Council - LearnEnglish   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Malcolm X--who was 39, and whose name was Malcolm Little--had just begun to address a meeting of his Organization for Afro-American Unity when he fell to the floor riddled by bullets.
Butler was described as a former pupil of Malcolm X and as a Black Muslim "enforcer" (disciplinarian).
Apparently in retaliation for the murder of Malcolm X, the Black Muslim mosque in Harlem (the Afro-American quarter of New York) was destroyed by fire on Feb. 23, and another in San Francisco slightly damaged.
www.britishcouncil.org /ZH/learnenglish-central-history-malcolmx.htm   (609 words)

  
 Richard Anthony Torres
Malcolm presents his belief in other minds by presenting a statement by J.S. Mill that speaks upon that of the question pertaining to the existence of other minds consisting of sensations and thoughts.
Malcolm thus response in reference to Hampshire’s statement, that the reasoning of Hampshire involves the assumption that other beings so have thoughts and sensations, because they are assumed to make inferences about the observed form observations of the observed behavior.
Malcolm therefore, presents that the notion of thinking in others is ultimately meaningless, because Price does not know that which would count towards it or even against such.
www.bsu.edu /web/00wwnewbold/portfolio/rich/paper4port/minds.html   (2722 words)

  
 The Wildebeest's Wardrobe: Norman Malcolm and Religious Doctrine
Norman Malcolm has a paper offering an analysis of the way we ordinarily use the phrase "I know".
Malcolm observes from cases that we often use the phrase "I know" and "I believe" to refer to the same belief/knowledge situation when all of the objective factors are the same.
Malcolm observes that this distinction between the strong and the weak use of "i know" cuts across the traditional distinction between a priori and a posteriori knowledge.
gnublog.blogspot.com /2007/02/norman-malcolm-and-religious-doctrine.html   (2012 words)

  
 Science Fair Projects - Norman Malcolm
Norman Malcolm (1911 – 1990) is an American philosopher.
During his first term at Cambridge in 1938, he met Ludwig Wittgenstein and attended Wittgenstein's lectures on the philosophical foundations of mathematics throughout 1939.
Malcolm remained one of Wittgenstein's closest friends, and his memoir of his time with Wittgenstein, published in 1958, is widely acclaimed as one of the most captivating and most accurate portraits of Wittgenstein's remarkable personality.
www.all-science-fair-projects.com /science_fair_projects_encyclopedia/Norman_Malcolm   (326 words)

  
 Anselm of Canterbury - Philosopedia.org
Malcolm stated that since no one has shown the concept of a necessary Being to be contradictory (logically impossible), then the existence of a necessary Being is possible.
Christian philosophers Norman Geisler [[8]] and Winfried Corduan [[9]] consider this the downfall of the ontological argument.
Second, Norman Malcolm's version of Anselm's second ontological argument leaves the realm of logical necessity since he admits he cannot prove that the concept of a necessary Being is not an impossible being.
philosopedia.org /index.php?title=Anselm_of_Canterbury   (1990 words)

  
 Lauriejbooks.com: Wittgenstein: A Religious Point of View? by Norman Malcolm - Mobipocket eBook - ebooks
This essay is the last work by the distinguished philosopher Norman Malcolm, before his death in the summer of 1990.
Malcolm first draws together a large and illuminating collection of remarks made by Wittgenstein at various stages of his life and in many different contexts, which are expressive of his attitude to religion.
Malcolm's essay is followed by a critical discussion by Peter Winch, which raises questions about Malcolm's interpretation of Wittgenstein's philosophy and also about his account of the relation between Wittgenstein's philosophy and attitude to religion.
www.lauriejbooks.com /productDetails?product_id=801   (251 words)

  
 Philosophical Apologetics- The Ontological Argument
Malcolm reasoned that the existence of a necessary Being can either be necessary (it cannot not exist), impossible (it cannot exist), or possible (it may or may not exist).
Malcolm stated that since no one has shown the concept of a necessary Being to be contradictory (logically impossible), then the existence of a necessary Being is possible.
Second, Norman Malcolm's version of Anselm's second ontological argument leaves the realm of logical necessity since he admits he cannot prove that the concept of a necessary Being is not an impossible being.
www.biblicaldefense.org /Writings/ontological_argument.htm   (1593 words)

  
 Parks Canada - Bethune Memorial House National Historic Site of Canada - Natural Wonders and Cultural Treasures
His father, Malcolm Nicolson Bethune (1857-1932), came from an old Canadian family who traced its ancestry to Scottish lairds and French Huguenots; his father, Norman's grandfather, had been one of the founding doctors of the medical faculty of Trinity College, Toronto.
Norman, Malcolm, Malcolm Jr., Elizabeth Ann (Goodwin), and Janet Louise Bethune, circa 1893.
From an early age, Norman was curious, independent, and stubborn; it was often difficult for him to stay within the confines set by his parents.
www.pc.gc.ca /lhn-nhs/on/bethune/natcul/natcul1_e.asp   (2120 words)

  
 Chicago Defender / Commentary
Malcolm was the first African American leader of national prominence in the 1960s to condemn the war.
Malcolm was the chief organizer of the Nation of Islam and the founder of the group’s newspaper Muhammad Speaks.
Malcolm spoke about the MMI and the OAAU in these terms: “Its aim is to create an atmosphere and facilities in which people who are interested in Islam can get a better understanding of Islam.
www.chicagodefender.com /page/commentary.cfm?ArticleID=772   (1402 words)

  
 Norman Malcolm to take up umpiring duties in Canada - JAMAICAOBSERVER.COM
President of the Jamaica Cricket Umpires Association (JCUA), Norman Malcolm was scheduled to leave the island on Thursday to officiate in an ICC Intercontinental Cricket Tournament in Canada.
Malcolm was expected to officiate in a four-day match featuring Canada against Bermuda between August 12-15 in the province of Toronto.
Malcolm was recently appointed to the ICC's A panel of umpires, which is a rung below the elite panel.
www.jamaicaobserver.com /sports/html/20060811T220000-0500_110993_OBS_NORMAN_MALCOLM_TO_TAKE_UP_UMPIRING_DUTIES_IN_CANADA.asp   (216 words)

  
 Norman MacAfee - "The Death of the Forest"
Norman MacAfee - "The Death of the Forest"
Norman MacAfee is a writer, translator, visual artist and editor, who lives in Greenwich Village with
Norman MacAfee has translated (with Luciano Martinengo) the only edition of the major poems of the Italian filmmaker and poet Pier Paolo Pasolini (1922-1975).
www.normanmacafee.com /forest.html   (422 words)

  
 Article/Video Detail - China As You Have Never Seen It Before!   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Norman, Malcolm, Malcolm Jr., Elizabeth Ann (Goodwin), and Janet Louise Bethune, circa 1893.
Henry Norman was born in the manse, March 3, 1890.
From an early age, Norman was curious, independent, and stubborn; it was often difficult for him to stay within the confines set by his parents.
www.chinaontv.com /ArtDetail.aspx?sm=319&ai=1781   (802 words)

  
 The Smoking Gun: The Malcolm X Files
On February 21, 1965, Malcolm X was shot to death as he delivered a speech in Manhattan's Audobon Ballroom.
The following March, three men -- Talmadge Hayer, Norman Butler, and Thomas Johnson -- were convicted of murdering the 39-year-old fl leader.
Though prosecutors suggested at trial that the slaying was plotted as "an object lesson for Malcolm's followers," no direct evidence linked the Nation of Islam -- from which Malcolm had publicly broken -- to the killing, though that speculation still thrives.
www.thesmokinggun.com /malcolmx/malcolmx.html   (215 words)

  
 Malcolm Middleton News
Malcolm will be playing an acoustic set as part of "Scottish Night" at this years Crossing Border Festival in The Hague.
Malcolm will be playing at the Portishead currated All Tomorrow's Parties which takes place on the 7th - 9th December in Minehead, England.
Malcolm is currently in the studio recording an acoustic(ish) mini(ish) album.
www.malcolmmiddleton.co.uk /news.htm   (112 words)

  
 Malcolm Canmore - Norman Conquest
The Norman Conquest (1066) increased the tendency of the English-speaking people of Lothian to acquiesce in the rule of a Celtic king, rather than in that of the adventurers who followed William of Normandy.
The dates are confused - Malcolm may have won the beautiful sister of Edgar, rightful king of England, in 1068, or at the time of his raid into Northumberland in 1070, said to have been of savage ferocity, and his yet more cruel reprisals for Gospatric's harrying of Cumberland.
A lover of books (which Malcolm could not read), an expert in "the delicate, and gracious, and bright works of women," Margaret brought her own gentleness and courtesy among a so-called rude people, built the abbey church of Dunfermline, and presented the churches with many beautiful golden reliquaries and fine sacramental plate.
www.ancientsites.com /aw/Post/772128   (481 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.