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Topic: Northwest Rebellion


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In the News (Tue 23 Jul 19)

  
  North-West Rebellion - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The North-West Rebellion (or North-West Resistance or the Saskatchewan Rebellion) of 1885 was a brief and unsuccessful attempt by the Métis people of Saskatchewan to establish their own sovereign nation independent of the Dominion of Canada.
After the so-called Red River Rebellion of 1869-1870, many of the Metis moved from Manitoba to Saskatchewan, then part of the Northwest Territories, founding a settlement at Batoche on the South Saskatchewan River.
However, as in Manitoba, settlers from Ontario began to arrive, and land began to be arranged in the square concession system of English Canada, rather than the seigneurial system of strips along a river that the Metis learned from their French-Canadian ancestors.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Northwest_Rebellion   (636 words)

  
 Term Paper on 1885 Northwest Rebellion
The Northwest Rebellion of 1885 was a time of discontent among the Metis and Indian people with the Federal Government.
This paper is set out to illustrate the events that caused the Northwest Rebellion of 1885 and its results.
…The purpose of the rebellion form Riel’s standpoint was that the extermination of the people that came here and took away their land and status as a people should result if their rights could not be respected.
www.swiftpapers.com /essay/1885_Northwest_Rebellion-119256.html   (186 words)

  
 Virtual Saskatchewan - Batoche
The Red River Rebellion of 1869-70, also led by Riel, was touched off by federal surveyors who refused to acknowledge traditional Metis land holdings in the district.
But ill feelings from the rebellion, fueled by an influx of white settlers, extinguished a government pledge to give the Metis a 1.4-million-acre land base.
Riel, who eventually moved to the U.S., in 1875 was granted amnesty for his role in the rebellion on condition he remain in exile for five more years.
www.virtualsk.com /current_issue/batoche.html   (1912 words)

  
 Battleford, Saskatchewan - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Founded in 1875 as a fur trading post and NWMP (Northwest Mounted Police, now Royal Canadian Mounted Police) it is the oldest community in Saskatchewan.
Between 1876 and 1883, Battleford was the territorial capital of the Northwest Territories (now Alberta, Saskatchewan, Nunavut, and the Northwest Territories) and the NWMP fort [1](Fort Battleford) located there played an important role in the 1885 Northwest Rebellion.
Government House, the seat of government of the NWT from 1876-1883, burned down on July 7, 2003.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Battleford,_Saskatchewan   (133 words)

  
 The Northwest Rebellion   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The North West Rebellion was quelled with A Battery participating in the final battle at Batoche.
The Northwest Campaign cost A and B Batteries together in casualties, four killed and 19 wounded.
Gunners’ Corpre and Beudry of A Battery were recommended for the Victoria Cross for their acts of bravery in rescuing a wounded comrade at the battle of Batoche.
www.mts.net /~1rchais/rebel.htm   (203 words)

  
 NorthWest Rebellion   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Map of the Northwest Territories in 1885 showing the sites of the military engagements at Duck Lake, Fish Creek, Batoche, Cut Knife Hill and Loon Lake.
A Timeline - this timeline from the resources of the University of Saskatchewan, details the majority of events that occurred during the rebellion.
He briefly describes the causes of the Rebellion and the battles which were fought.
members.shaw.ca /bskaalid/riel/nwrebellion.html   (120 words)

  
 Northwest Rebellion   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The goal of this unit is to develop an awareness and understanding for First Nations and Metis people during a time in history when changes and adjustments to their livelihood were being challenged.
The purpose of this unit is to give students' an opportunity to involve themselves in a part of history that is significant to First Nations and Metis people.
The core unit of study is on "identity" in the grade four Saskatchewan social studies curriculum guide, which relates to the objective of this unit.
collections.ic.gc.ca /sifc/northwestintro.htm   (239 words)

  
 MSN Encarta - Print Preview - Sir John MacDonald
When Macdonald declared that the money could not be raised, one of his advisors quickly reminded him that “The day the Canadian Pacific busts, the Conservative Party busts the day after.” The government and the railway were both saved by the second Métis resistance, the Northwest Rebellion of 1885.
The Northwest Rebellion had, in fact, been partly caused by the CPR.
The Métis had hunted the last of the bison (usually called buffalo), which were essential to their culture, and the railroad was bringing settlers to destroy what remained of their old way of life.
encarta.msn.com /text_761556033___14/Sir_John_MacDonald.html   (497 words)

  
 Red River and Northwest Rebellions in Canada, 1870 & 1885
Northwest Rebellion, 1885, by University of Saskatchewan Library.
Northwest Rebellion in Canada 1885, by Ralph Zuljan (OnWar.Com)
Riel, Dumont and the 1885 Northwest Rebellion, by B. Brown.
www.regiments.org /wars/19thcent/85ca-nw.htm   (534 words)

  
 Battle Honours of The Royal Canadian Regiment   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The Rebellion broke out due to conditions imposed by the government on the Metis, who were of either French/Indian or Scottish/Indian parentage.
This was the second Battle Honour received by The Regiment and the second of two to be awarded in the Northwest Rebellion of 1885.
At the time of the Northwest Rebellion, the area the battle occurred in was called Northwest Canada.
novembercoy.tripod.com /BattleHonours.htm   (14472 words)

  
 Louis Riel and the Northwest Rebellion
Using a Chronology of Events of Northwest Rebellion, prepare a modified timeline of the Northwest Rebellion, identifying points at which either the federal government or the Metis could have decided differently.
You are a war correspondent covering the Northwest Rebellion for the Montreal Gazette who has managed to get an interview with one of the Canadian force's leaders.
Research Riel's behaviour prior to and during the Rebellion and write a position paper on the question of Riel's sanity.
wblrd.sk.ca /~hist30mk/module2/activity3d_2.html   (348 words)

  
 THE ROYAL CANADIAN MOUNTED POLICE
In 1905, the Royal Northwest Mounted Police contracted to police the new provinces of Saskatchewan and Alberta.
In 1917, when policing contracts in Canada were terminated, the Royal Northwest Mounted Police were only responsible for federal law enforcement in Alberta, Saskatchewan and the territories.
Federal policing was reorganized again in 1920 and the Royal Northwest Mounted Police absorbed the Dominion Police.
www.suite101.com /article.cfm/5086/35588   (495 words)

  
 Study Guide for Beal & MacLeod   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Beal and MacLeod are trying to produce a sound, judicious narrative of the rebellion based on previous histories and on all evidence brought to light to date.
The authors also assert that the disaffection of Indians and whites in the west, along with the Métis, was important in bringing on the rebellion of 1885.
The climax of this chapter is the Red River Rebellion of 1869-79, when Canadian authority supplanted that of the Hudson Bay Co.
www.ndsu.nodak.edu /instruct/isern/382/beal.htm   (1142 words)

  
 History Channel Classroom:
The Old Northwest, just past the Alleghenies, was the wild American frontier of the 17th and 18th centuries.
Leading a confederacy composed of different Native American tribes from the Northeast to the Northwest, the great warrior Pontiac posed one of the greatest threats to English sovereignty and control in the Old Northwest.
His mighty rebellion wreaked havoc in British forts before it was finally put down, but Pontiac was ultimately considered a disgrace to his own name and was murdered in cold blood.
www.historychannel.com /classroom/admin/study_guide/archives/thc_guide.0105.html   (341 words)

  
 Module 5 / Unit 2: Topic 2: Métis Rebellions   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The Métis were a people of mixed aboriginal and French descent who lived in the Northwest Territories and who engaged in hunting, trading and some agriculture.
In 1869, the Northwest Territories was to be transferred from the Hudson's Bay Company to the Canadian government.
The rebellion however failed with the Métis defeat at Batoche and the capture of Riel.
www.qesn.meq.gouv.qc.ca /socialsciences/cycles45/history/lessons/m5u2l2.htm   (319 words)

  
 Empire of the Bay: Louis Riel
Louis Riel was the leader of the Métis people during the Red River Rebellion of 1869.
Granted amnesty in the Manitoba Act, Riel spent several years in the Canadian parliament, but he was outlawed for five years in 1875 and spent a year as a mental patient in 1877.
He returned to Canada in 1885 to lead the Northwest Rebellion, an unsuccessful movement against Canadian rule of Saskatchewan.
www.pbs.org /empireofthebay/profiles/riel.html   (292 words)

  
 Saskatchewan Forts
The fort sheltered the local settlers during the Northwest Rebellion.
The Canadian Militia built Fort Otter, a fortified camp, at the former Government House in 1885 in response to the Northwest Rebellion.
Located at Kinsmen Park, it was used by the NWMP during the Northwest Rebellion.
www.geocities.com /naforts/sk.html   (722 words)

  
 Northwest Resistance: Chronology of Events
In the early 1880s almost everyone living in the Northwest Territories had grievances against the Government of Canada.
The native people had signed treaties which were supposed to compensate them for giving up claim to the whole of the territory and agreeing to settle on reserves and learn white-style agriculture.
A number of Métis involved in the rebellion plead guilty to treason-felony and receive prison sentences ranging from one to seven years.
library.usask.ca /northwest/background/chronol.htm   (1017 words)

  
 Northwest Rebellion - Tracking Time - Canada, by Train
The fact that a new railway brought people, development and industry was not lost on Louis Riel and his followers.
They felt the federal government was inattentive to their concerns over land surveys, plans for mass western settlement and railroad building.
By the time of the Northwest Rebellion in 1885, Riel and his followers had reached their limit.
www.nlc-bnc.ca /2/30/h30-3090-e.html   (220 words)

  
 Northwest Rebellion in Saskatchwan ... battle at Batoche
The CPR was near bankruptcy, and was literally saved by the Rebellion, a fact which has led to several conspiracy theories.
Big Bear and Poundmaker were dealing with their own issues and their own battles, which kept them at a distance and they were not able to assist the Metis directly.
This was the last of the fighting in the Northwest Rebellion.
geocities.com /SoHo/Atrium/4832/ending.html   (2026 words)

  
 Northwest Rebellion in Saskatchwan
There was tremendous distress throughout the Northwest of Canada and the plains of the U.S.A. This was the period of time when both countries were trying to coerce the Aboriginals out of their land and resources.
Canada sent surveyors into the diminished Northwest, who began surveying Metis land in square sections, disregarding the long river lots already in use.
One hundred of the newly formed NorthWest Mounted Police, under Colonel Irvine, were assigned to move into the Northwest to use force if necessary against the petitioners.
www.geocities.com /SoHo/Atrium/4832/batoche.html   (1911 words)

  
 deseretnews.com | Canada mourns 4 Mounties
The Northwest Rebellion was an unsuccessful attempt by indigenous rebels to establish an independent nation in the northwestern frontier.
The Mounties, with their bright red tunics and broad-brimmed Stetsons, are as much a national symbol as a police force.
Legend has it that the small Northwest Mounted Police, formed in 1873 to bring order to the Canadian west, wore their scarlet tunics so natives could readily distinguish them from the blue-coated U.S. cavalry.
deseretnews.com /dn/view/0,1249,600116448,00.html   (692 words)

  
 CanSeek.CA » Saskatchewan » Society and Culture » History   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Northwest Resistance - A searchable database of bibliographic records of materials held by the University of Saskatchewan, relating to the Riel Rebellion at Batoche, along with a chronology of events, biographies of the key participants in the uprising, and photographs.
Poundmaker, Big Bear, and the 1885 Rebellion - An account of the Native half of the 1885 Northwest Rebellion.
Riel, Dumont, and the 1885 Northwest Rebellion - An account of the role of the Metis in this Western Canadian rebellion.
www.canseek.ca /Saskatchewan/Society_and_Culture/History   (291 words)

  
 The Northwest Confederacy - AlternateHistory.com Discussion Board   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
The Administration reverses itself by permitting elections in those states not in open rebellion and the new election date is set in December.
Tired by the continued war and shaken by the Northwest Rebellion the electoral turnout favors McClellan and Lincoln accedes to the decision of the polls.
The independence of the Confederate States of America, the Northwest Confederacy, the Republic of New England and the California Republic from the United States of America is formally recognized.
www.alternatehistory.com /discussion/showthread.php?t=431   (2024 words)

  
 In The Line of Duty - Blotter Story   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
During the Northwest Rebellion, 17 members of the Northwest Mounted Police were killed and several others wounded in a gun battle with Métis rebels at Duck Lake, Sask.
One of the most notorious police killers was Albert Johnson, the Mad Trapper of Rat River in the Northwest Territories, who evaded an RCMP manhunt around Fort McPherson in the Yukon for weeks as 1931 turned into '32.
Alfred King was shot in the chest and saved only after he was strapped onto a dog sled and endured a 20-hour trip through the bitterest cold.
www.lineofduty.com /blotterstory.asp?StoryID=73469   (320 words)

  
 MSN Encarta - Search Results - Northwest Rebellion
MSN Encarta - Search Results - Northwest Rebellion
main article, Battle of Duck Lake, cause of Northwest Rebellion, leader of rebellion, outcome, role of prime ministers
A second Métis rising, the Northwest Rebellion, flared up in 1885, not in Manitoba but among newer Métis settlements in the Saskatchewan valley...
ca.encarta.msn.com /Northwest_Rebellion.html   (106 words)

  
 Canadian Dimension / Articles » Fraud and Theft of Saskatchewan Lands Uncovered in ICC Investigation (Lloyd Dolha)
Just after the Northwest Rebellion of 1885, the federal government negotiated adhesions to Treaty 5 and Treaty 6, early in September 1876 for the formation of Indian reserves, with the then James Smith Band (IR 100), the Cumberland Band (IR 20 and IR 100A), and the Chakastaypasin Band (IR 98), of the Prince Albert area.
Before and after the Northwest Rebellion, members of the Chakastaypasin Band from IR 98 were migrating to the new Cumberland reserve including the headman Kahtapiskowat.
Members of the Chakastaypasin were branded as ‘rebels’ during the Northwest Rebellion, though no evidence existed to support that claim.
canadiandimension.com /articles/2005/09/27/170   (1697 words)

  
 Chanson de Louis Riel   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-18)
Notes: From Fowke/MacMillan - "Louis Riel, the leader of the Métis in both the Red River Rebellion in 1870 and the Northwest Rebellion in 1885, was taken prisoner when his followers were defeated at Batoche on 12 May 1885.
He said that Riel had composed it while in jail, which may well be true for he is known to have written other poems and songs.
It is written in the form of a letter from a prisoner to his mother as he is facing execution.
www.csufresno.edu /folklore/ballads/FowM008.html   (241 words)

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