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Topic: Numa Pompilius


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In the News (Thu 20 Jun 19)

  
  Numa Pompilius - Crystalinks
According to legend, Numa Pompilius was the second of the Kings of Rome, succeeding Romulus.
She died after being married to Numa for 13 years and Numa retired to a country life, advised by the nymph Egeria who met him by her spring in a sacred grove and taught him to be a wise legislator.
Numa Pompilius died in 673 BC when he was older than eighty.
www.crystalinks.com /pompilius.html   (513 words)

  
  NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Numa Pompilius
She died after being married to Numa for 13 years and Numa retired to a country life, advised by the nymph Egeria who met him by her spring in a sacred grove and taught him to be a wise legislator.
In other Roman institutions established by Numa, Plutarch thought he detected a Laconian influence, attributing the connection to the Sabine culture of Numa, for "Numa was descended of the Sabines, who declare themselves to be a colony of the Lacedaemonians." In the Roman Republic, the Pontifex Maximus was the head of the Roman religion.
Numa and Lycurgus - Pelopidas and Marcellus - Philopoemen and Flamininus - Phocion and Cato the Younger - Pompey and Agesilaus
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Numa-Pompilius   (3363 words)

  
 The Internet Classics Archive | Numa Pompilius by Plutarch
Numa was about forty years of age when the ambassadors came to make him offers of the kingdom; the speakers were Proculus and Velesus, one or other of whom it had been thought the people would elect as their new king; the original Romans being for Proculus, and the Sabines for Velesus.
The statutes prescribed by Numa for the vestals were these: that they should take a vow of virginity for the space of thirty years, the first ten of which they were to spend in learning their duties, the second ten in performing them, and the remaining ten in teaching and instructing others.
Numa displayed the target to the artificers and bade them show their skill in making others like it; all despaired, until at length one Mamurius Veturius, an excellent workman, happily hit upon it, and made all so exactly the same that Numa himself was at a loss and could not distinguish.
classics.mit.edu /Plutarch/numa_pom.html   (4249 words)

  
 Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Numa Pompilius
In Roman mythology, Numa Pompilius was the second king of Rome, succeeding after Romulus.
Wishing to show his favour, the god Mars caused a shield to fall from the sky on the Palatine Hill, which had letters of prophecy written on it, and in which the fate of Rome as a city was tied up.
When Numa Pompilius died in 673 BC, Egeria changed him into a well, located in the forest of Aricia[?], holy to Diana, in Latium.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/nu/Numa_Pompilius   (163 words)

  
 Numa Pompilius - LoveToKnow 1911
NUMA POMPILIUS, second legendary king of Rome (715-672 B.C.), was a Sabine, a native of Cures, and his wife was the daughter of Titus Tatius, the Sabine colleague of Romulus.
He was elected by the Roman people at the close of a year's interregnum, during which the sovereignty had been exercised by the members of the senate in rotation.
After a long and peaceful reign, during which the gates of Janus were closed, Numa died and was succeeded by the warlike Tullus Hostilius.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Numa_Pompilius   (340 words)

  
 Plutarch's Lives : NUMA POMPILIUS
He was also guardian of the vestal virgins, the institution of whom, and of their perpetual fire, was attributed to Numa, who, perhaps fancied the charge of pure and uncorrupted flames would be fitly entrusted to chaste and unpolluted persons, or that fire, which consumes, but produces nothing, bears all analogy to the virgin estate.
Numa, also, was founder of several other orders of priests, two of which I shall mention, the Salii and the Feciales, which are among the clearest proofs of the devoutness and sanctity of his character.
Numa contrived one day to surprise these demi-gods, by mixing wine and honey in the waters of the spring of which they usually drank.
www.annourbis.com /Latin-Authors/Plutarch/plivs10_numa_pompilius.html   (4346 words)

  
 Plutarch's Life of Numa Pompilius
She is said to have died after she had been married thirteen years, [4] and then Numa, leaving the conversation of the town, betook himself to a country life, and in a solitary manner frequented the groves and fields consecrated to the gods, passing his life in desert places.
[5] Numa was about forty years of age when the ambassadors came to make him offers of the kingdom; the speakers were Proculus and Velesus, one or other of whom it had been thought the people would elect as their new king; the original Romans being for Proculus, and the Sabines for Velesus.
Numa, also, was founder of several other orders of priests, two of which I shall mention, the Salii and the Feciales, which are among the clearest proofs of the devoutness and sanctity of his character.
www.bostonleadershipbuilders.com /plutarch/numapompilius.htm   (4759 words)

  
 Numa Pompilius
In Roman mythology, Numa Pompilius was the second king of Rome, succeeding after Romulus.
Wishing to show his favour, the god Mars caused a shield to fall from the sky on the Palatine Hill, which had letters of prophecy written on it, and in which the fate of Rome as a city was tied up.
When Numa Pompilius died in 673 BC, Egeria changed him into a well, located in the forest of Aricia[?], holy to Diana, in Latium.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/nu/Numa_Pompilius.html   (138 words)

  
 The Baldwin Project: Our Young Folks' Plutarch by Rosalie Kaufman
Numa pretended that a certain goddess or mountain nymph was in love with him, and that it was through her and the Muses that he received all his revelations.
Numa built temples to faith, and taught his subjects that to swear by faith was the greatest of all oaths, because he wished them to [49] consider their word as binding as any contract in writing could be.
Numa's reign being distinguished for peace, the temple of Janus remained shut for a space of forty-three years; for not only were the people of Rome influenced by their just and wise king, but their neighbors too began to improve, and all Italy was benefited.
www.mainlesson.com /display.php?author=kaufman&book=plutarch&story=numa   (3878 words)

  
 Numa Pompilius,the priest king   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Numa loved the simple and frugal life and he liked to go often in the woods because he believed that they were inhabited by the gods.
Numa decided to allow the needed integration among the different communities living in Rome and he decided to divide the population by jobs, giving each corporation a worship center and a meeting room.
Numa is remembered to have been a king who spent his life preserving the peace among the inhabitants of Rome and when he died at the age of 80 years old, the Romans felt to have lost a relative more than a king.
www.gladiatour.com /kings-age/numa-pompilius-second-king.html   (1798 words)

  
 Numa tradition - NovaRoma
Numa Pompilius, Sabine by birth and second king of Rome, received this tradition from the Gods, through Egeria in the sacred grove of Carmentis, and through direct contact with the highest gods.
The Numa tradition was generally regarded to have forbidden the use of blood sacrifices.
As Plutarch explained about the rituals handed down from Numa Pompilius, "they were not celebrated with effusion of blood, but consisted of flour, wine, and the least costly offerings." Only later were immolationes introduced.
www.novaroma.org /nr/Numa_tradition   (586 words)

  
 From Plutarch's Lives: Numa Pompilius - Sidebar - MSN Encarta
His short biographies of notable Greek and Roman figures are renowned not only for their portraits of ancient life, but also for their study of character and morality.
Although historians disagree as to when Rome’s legendary early king, Numa Pompilius, may have ruled, Plutarch offers an account of the ascetic leader’s reputed relationship with the gods and the practices he instituted to honor them.
Numa Pompilius was considered the first Pontifex Maximus (high Roman priest) and was credited with having founded several orders of priests and the order of vestal virgins.
encarta.msn.com /sidebar_762512364/From_Plutarch's_Lives_Numa_Pompilius.html   (150 words)

  
 Numa Pompilius
Numa believed that fire was the primary principle of the universe, that blood sacrifice was odious to the deities, and that peace was the highest civic goal.
Numa is also credited with diverting the Etruscans from thoughts of war to a peaceful existence.
Numa built the temple of Janus, whose doors were open during war to symbolize soldiers marching out.
www.ancientworlds.net /47458   (295 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Numa Pompilius   (Site not responding. Last check: )
His father was called Pomponius and Numa was the youngest of four sons, being born on the day of the foundation of Rome.
This lead to stories about him having retired to a country life because of the goddess Egeria who met him by a spring in a sacred grove and taught him how to be a wise legislator.
Numa was around fourty when he was offered the kingdom and he at first, refused but his father and Marcius I (Marcius II's father) took him aside and perusaded him to accept.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Numa_Pompilius   (464 words)

  
 Numa Pompilius - Plutarch's Lives - translated by John Dryden and revised by Arthur Hugh Clough, Book, etext
When Numa had, by such measures, won the favor and affection of the people, he set himself, without delay, to the task of bringing the hard and iron Roman temper to somewhat more of gentleness and equity.
He was also guardian of the vestal virgins, the institution of whom, and of their perpetual fire, was attributed to Numa, who, perhaps fancied the charge of pure and uncorrupted flames would be fitly entrusted to chaste and unpolluted persons, or that fire, which consumes, but produces nothing, bears all analogy to the virgin estate.
Numa, also, was founder of several other orders of priests, two of which I shall mention, the Salii and the Feciales, which are among the clearest proofs of the devoutness and sanctity of his character.
whitewolf.newcastle.edu.au /words/authors/P/Plutarch/prose/plutachslives/numapompilius.html   (4321 words)

  
 Numa Pompilius
A Sabine, Numa Pompilius was the second king of Rome (714-673 BC).
Unlike his predecessor Romulus, Numa maintained peaceful relations with the surrounding towns, preferring instead to nurture the religious development of his people.
Numa is credited with many of the religious ceremonies and customs practiced later by the Roman people.
dante.udallas.edu /hutchison/Seven_kings/Numa/numa_pompilius.htm   (71 words)

  
 Numa, Pompilius   (Site not responding. Last check: )
To Numa were attributed the reformation of the calendar, the reorganization of the state religion, the regulation of religious rites and ceremonies, the organization of the several sacerdotal colleges, and the establishment of the system of sacral law.
Most modern scholars suppose, however, that much of Numa's activity in the religious area, for which he is said to have received advice from Egeria, a neighboring nymph, rather resulted from an evolutionary process requiring several generations for its development.
Some of these savants accept the historical reality of Numa as a person who initiated rather than completed the Roman religious development.
www.themystica.com /mystica/articles/n/numa_pompilius.html   (139 words)

  
 The Baldwin Project: Famous Men of Rome by John H. Haaren & A. B. Poland   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The first thing that Numa did after learning that he had been chosen king was to consult the augurs, to find out if it was the will of the gods that he should be the ruler of Rome.
Numa was very friendly with the people of the countries surrounding Rome.
Numa Pompilius reigned for nearly half a century, and under him the Romans were a peaceful, prosperous, and happy people.
www.mainlesson.com /display.php?author=haaren&book=rome&story=numa   (1430 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Numa Pompilius
Their religious lawgiver, Numa, he says, “forbade the Romans to represent the deity in the form either of man or of beast.
The most famous was that he was a friend of Pythagoras, who is traditionally thought to have died around 500 B.C [ref: Mommsen, T. The History of Rome].
Numa Pompilius' life according to Plutarch on the Project Gutenberg website.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Numa_Pompilius   (657 words)

  
 Kings of Rome   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The origin of Roman ceremonial law and religious rites was ascribed to the successor of Romulus: Numa Pompilius.
Among other achievements, he was supposedly responsible for the pontifices, flamens (sacred priests), vestal virgins, worship of Terminus (the god of landmarks), the building of the temple of Janus, and the reorganization of the calendar into days for business and holidays.
As Romulus and Numa represent the Ramnes and Tities, so, in order to complete the list of the four traditional elements of the nation, Tullus was made the representative of the Luceres, and Ancus the founder of the Plebs.
www.roma-imperiale.com /kings_of_rome.html   (1300 words)

  
 Ancient Greece and Rome 1200 B.c.e.-476 C.e.: Religion: Pompilius, Numa | Arts Through the Eras: Ancient Greece and ...
Numa Pompilius may never have existed, but the Romans looked back to him as the founder of their religion.
Numa drew up a lunar calendar of twelve months, with extra days inserted by the pontiffs to keep it congruent with the solar year.
Another legend about Numa made him a disciple of the Greek philosopher Pythagoras of Samos, who had a group of followers in the Greek settlement of Croton on the Gulf of Taranto in Italy, and then in Metapontum after they were expelled from Croton.
www.bookrags.com /research/religion-ancient-greece-and-rome-12-ahe-02/pompilius-numa-ahe-02.html   (787 words)

  
 Numa Pompilius
Numa had been born on the very day Rome was founded (21 April), and was the son-in-law of Tatius, a Sabine who had ruled Rome as co-king with Romulus for a period of five years.
After Numa's wife died, he had become something of a recluse, and was believed to have been taken by a nymph or nature spirit called Egeria as her lover.
When the delegation from Rome came, Numa refused the position of king at first, but was later talked into accepting by his father and Marcius, a relative, and some of the local people from Cures.
www.suite101.com /article.cfm/ancient_biographies/106541   (401 words)

  
 The Classics Pages: Antony Kamm's 'The Romans': 1.3 Etruscan Influence
It depicts Numa Pompilius at the altar sacrificing a goat, which is held by a boy.
The family of Pomponius was supposed to have descended from a son of Numa.
Numa Pompilius - peaceful reign, responsible for introducing many religious festivals, building the Temple of Vesta and adding January and February to the calendar.
www.the-romans.co.uk /legends03.htm   (695 words)

  
 Numa Pompilius Beschreibung in Library - Definition und Buch-Tipp.
Sollte eine Definition von Numa Pompilius fehlen, kann diese von Ihnen verfaßt werden.
Numa Pompilius war der Sage nach der zweite König von Rom.
Deshalb kann es vorkommen, dass vorgeschlagene Bücher nicht ganz der Thema 'Numa Pompilius' entsprechen.
numa_pompilius.know-library.net   (643 words)

  
 Numa Pompilius - Plutarch's Lives
Yet, in any case, Numa was descended of the Sabines, who declare themselves to be a colony of the Lacedæmonians.
When Numa had, by such measures, won the favor and affection of the people, he set himself, without delay, to the task of bringing the hard and iron Roman temper to somewhat more of gentleness and equity.
The stone bridge was built a very long time after, when Æmilius was quæstor, and they do, indeed, say also that the wooden bridge was not so old as Numa’s time, but was finished by Ancus Marcius, when he was king, who was the grandson of Numa by his daughter.
www.constitution.org /rom/plutarch/numapompilius.htm   (4303 words)

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