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Topic: Nurhaci


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  Upto11.net - Wikipedia Article for Nurhaci
Nurhaci's organisation of the Manchu people and first attack on the Ming Dynasty laid the groundwork for the conquest of China by the Qing Dynasty.
Nurhaci was the organizer of the Eight Banners, which would eventually form the elite that would dominate the Qing empire.
Nurhaci was succeeded by his eighth son, Hong Taiji, otherwise known as Abahai.
upto11.net /generic_wiki.php?q=nurhaci   (509 words)

  
  Wikipedia: Nurhaci
Nurhaci was the organizer of the Eight Banners, which would eventually form the elite that would dominate the Qing empire.
Nurhaci led many successful engagements against the Ming empire, the Koreans, the Mongols, and other Jurchen clans, greatly enlarging the territory under his control.
Nurhaci was wounded in the battle; he did not recover, and he died on September 30 1626.
www.factbook.org /wikipedia/en/n/nu/nurhaci.html   (370 words)

  
 Nurhaci - Information at Halfvalue.com
Nurhaci (Chinese: 努爾哈赤; pinyin: NÇ”'ěrhāchì or Chinese: 努爾哈齊; pinyin: NÇ”'ěrhāqí) (1558-1626) is considered to be the founding father of the Manchu state in China.
Nurhaci's organization of the Manchu people, his attacks on China's Ming Dynasty and Korea's Joseon Dynasty, and his conquest of China's northeastern Liaodong province, laid the groundwork for the conquest of China by the Qing Dynasty.
Nurhaci was the organizer of the Eight Banners, which would eventually form the backbone of the military that would dominate the Qing empire.
www.halfvalue.com /wiki.jsp?topic=Nurhaci   (968 words)

  
 Nurhaci - China-related Topics NU-NZ - China-Related Topics
Nurhaci's organisation of the Manchu people and first attack on the Ming Dynasty laid the ground work for the conquest of China by the Qing Dynasty.
From 1583 onwards Nurhaci began to unify the Jurchen bands, and when he was 25, he attacked Nikan Wailan to avenge the deaths of his father and grandfather, starting out with only thirteen suits of armor.
Nurhaci was wounded in the battle; he did not recover, and he died on September 30 1626.
www.famouschinese.com /virtual/Nurhaci   (580 words)

  
 Wikipedia: Manchu
Manchu was originally a tribal group of the Jurchen that Nurhaci belonged to.
Nurhaci's son Hong Taiji decided to call themselves Manchus and prohibited the use of Jurchen.
In 1616 a Manchu leader, Nurhaci (1559-1626) established the Later Jin Dynasty (Amaga Aisin Gurun, 後金 Hòu Jīn), domestically called the State of Manchu (manju gurun), and unified Manchu tribes.
www.factbook.org /wikipedia/en/m/ma/manchu.html   (491 words)

  
 Manchus - Mw
The Manchus were descendants of the Jurchens, who had conquered a vast area in northeastern Asia in the twelfth century and established the Jinn Dynasty (literally Golden Dynasty) under the Wanyan clan that ruled over Manchuria and the northern half of China until being conquered and destroyed by the Mongols under Genghis Khan.
Nurhaci's son Hong Taiji decided the Jurchens would call themselves Manju (Manchus) and prohibited the use of the name Jurchen.
Nurhaci later conquered the Mukden (modern-day Shenyang) area and built it into a new capital of Qing Empire in 1621.
muslimwikipedia.com /mw/index.php/Manchus   (1352 words)

  
 Nurhaci - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Nurhaci (Chinese: 努爾哈齊; pinyin: Nǔ'ěrhāqí]) (1558-1626) is considered to be the founding father of the Manchu state in China.
Nurhaci's organization of the Manchu people, his attacks on China's Ming Dynasty and Korea's Joseon Dynasty, and his conquest of China's northeastern Liaodong province, laid the groundwork for the conquest of China by the Qing Dynasty.
Nurhaci was the last chieftain of the Jianzhou Jurchens and First Khan of Later Jin.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Nurhaci   (891 words)

  
 Manchu
Nurhaci's son Hong Taiji decided to call themselves Manju and prohibited the use of Jurchen.
In 1616 a Manchu leader, Nurhaci[?] (1559-1626) established the Later Jin Dynasty (後金 hou4 jin1), domestically called the State of Manchu (manju gurun), and unified Manchu tribes.
When the Beijing was captured by Li Zicheng[?] in 1644, the Qing Empire invaded China proper and moved the capital from Mukden(Chinese city since Warring States) to Beijing.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ma/Manchus.html   (369 words)

  
 Nurhaci - Cleverpedia, the ultimate encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Nurhaci (努爾哈赤) or (努尔哈赤) (Nu-erh-hectar-ch'ih) (py: nu it hectar chi) (*1559, 30 September 1626) combined the Mandschuren to a people, who 1644 under the Qing dynasty actually tore the rule over the Empire of China.
In the autumn 1619 conquered Nurhaci first Chinese cities, in the subsequent year 1620 was it already 70 small and large cities in Liaoning.
There Nurhaci died on 30 September 1626 in the newly built emperor palace at the consequences of a cannon shot in a lost battle with Ningyuan.
cleverpedia.com /Nurhaci   (685 words)

  
 Manchu Summary
Nurhaci's successor, Abahai (1592–1643), changed the name of his people to Manchu in order to remove the historical memory that as Jurchens they had been under Chinese rule.
The name Manchu was formally adopted by Nurhaci of the Jianzhou Jurchens in 1635, though it may have been in use as early as 1605.
Nurhaci's son Hong Taiji decided the Jurchens would call themselves Manchus and prohibited the use of the name Jurchen.
www.bookrags.com /Manchu   (1757 words)

  
 The Ultimate Nurhaci Dog Breeds Information Guide and Reference
Nurhaci's organisation of the Manchu people and first attack on the Ming Dynasty laid the ground work for the conquest of China by the Qing Dynasty.
From 1583 onwards Nurhaci began to unify the Jurchen bands, and when he was 25, he attacked Nikan Wailan to avenge the deaths of his father and grandfather, starting out with only thirteen suits of armor.
Nurhaci was succeed by his eighth son Hong Taiji.
www.dogluvers.com /dog_breeds/Nurhaci   (513 words)

  
 INTRODUCTION
The entire population was enrolled in quasi-military units, each identified by a colored banners crossed tribal lines and were commanded by appointed officers rather than hereditary chiefs, they marked a shifted from tribal to bureaucratic organization.
Nurhaci also sponsored the invention of a Manchu writing system, based on the Mongolian alphabet.
Nurhaci died in 1626 and was succeeded by his eighth son, Huang Taiji.
samzhang.tripod.com /jessica/Qing.html   (1035 words)

  
 Ming Empire 1368-1644 by Sanderson Beck
The Manchu leader Nurhaci was born in 1559 in the Jianzhou tribe among the Jurchens.
To gain revenge Nurhaci championed the Manchu cause and was attacked by the Liaodong governor in 1587.
Nurhaci was succeeded by his eighth son, Abahai (Hong Taiji), in December 1629, and the next month the Manchus took over Guan near Beijing.
www.san.beck.org /3-7-MingEmpire.html   (23715 words)

  
 Nurhaci Did You Mean nurhaci?   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Nurhaci's organisation of the Manchu people, his attacks on the Ming Dynasty and Joseon Dynasty Korea, and his conquest of China's northeastern Liaodong province, laid the groundwork for the conquest of China by the Qing Dynasty.
Nurhaci was wounded in the battle by Yuan's Portuguese cannon.
Nurhaci was succeeded by his eighth son, Hong Taiji, erroneously referred to as Abahai.
www.did-you-mean.com /Nurhaci.html   (730 words)

  
 Qing1
In 1601 Nurhaci created a military administration which was headed by aristocrats from the clans of the alliance.
In 1616 Nurhaci, who was the leader respected by both Manchus and Mongols now, proclaimed himself Khan and founded the Later Jin dynasty.
Nurhaci died soon after the founding of the capital and was succeeded by Abahai (1627-1643).
darkwing.uoregon.edu /~inaasim/Mingqing04/Qing2.htm   (1149 words)

  
 6. The Qing Empire - All Empires
Nurhaci proclaimed the founding of "Da Jin", or the Jin state, in 1616.
The able Nurhaci saw that the declining Ming Dynasty was no match for his young and rising Jin state.
Nurhaci was badly defeated and wounded in this battle, and died soon after, leaving the throne to his son Abahai.
www.allempires.com /article/index.php?q=The_Qing_Empire   (6824 words)

  
 Did Huangtaiji usurp the throne? - China History Forum, chinese history forum
It was said that Nurhaci asked for the council of the princes (the 4 grand beiles) to elect a suitable person amongst them to succeed him.
Nurhaci was suspicious and investigated the matter and found out that Daishan had affair with Dafujin.
But he possessed both courage and guile, commanded troops and went to war as early as 20, and by 36 he was crowned the next ruler of the jurchens.
www.chinahistoryforum.com /index.php?showtopic=14512&view=getnewpost   (1307 words)

  
 www.China-Defense.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
After he united the four tribes of the Manchus, Nurhaci legitimized his regime by founding the Jin Dynasty (or Later Jin, since the first Jin Dynasty was the one founded by the Jurchens in the 12th century) in 1616.
Confident after his successes, Nurhaci pressed on toward Beijing, but when he attacked the Chinese garrison at Ningyuan in 1625, the garrison commander Yuan Chonghuan skillfully used his cannons against his army and fatally injured the Manchu khan himself.
So Nurhaci died disgruntled and without reaching his goals, but his ambitions would be carried on by his descendants.
www.china-defense.com /history/1644/1644-8.html   (687 words)

  
 Nurhaci | THG Lexikon
Nurhaci (努爾哈赤)oder (努尔哈赤) (Nu-erh-ha-ch'ih) (py: nu er ha chi) (*1559, † 30.
Nurhacis Regierung stützte sich zunächst auf seinen Bruder Surhaci (1564-1611) und seinen Sohn Cuyen (1580-1615), die als Mitregenten fungierten.
Auf Nurhacis Befehl hin wurden nun möglichst viele unzuverlässig erscheinende Chinesen getötet, dafür aber die Deportation aufgehoben.
www.tomshardware.de /lexikon/Nurhachi   (621 words)

  
 ja #28288 #27954 #20154 The Manchu manju in Manchu...
Manchu was originally a tribal group of the Jurchen that Nurhaci Nurhaci belonged to.
Nurhaci's son Hong Taiji Hong Taiji decided to call themselves "Manchus" and prohibited the use of "Jurchen".
In 1616 1616 a Manchu leader, Nurhaci (1559 1559-1626 1626) established the Later Jin Dynasty (Amaga Aisin Gurun, 後金 Hòu Jīn), domestically called the State of Manchu (manju gurun), and unified Manchu tribes.
www.biodatabase.de /Manchu   (573 words)

  
 Manchu Y chromosomes
Similarly, in the new study, the researchers suggest that the Manchu Y chromosomes were spread by the nobility of the Qing dynasty (which ruled from 1644 to 1912).
This dynasty was founded by Nurhaci (1559-1626), and the nobility were a privileged, male-line elite descended from Nurhaci's paternal grandfather, Giocaugga (who died in 1582).
There were 80 000 officially documented members of the nobility by the end of the Qing dynasty, with an estimated 1.6 million descendants today.
genome.wellcome.ac.uk /doc_WTX031718.html   (231 words)

  
 Nurhaci - HighBeam Encyclopedia
Further victories followed, and in 1625 he moved the Manchu capital to Shenyang (Mukden).
During this later period, Nurhaci developed a civil administration with the help of captured Chinese officials.
Find newspaper and magazine articles plus images and maps related to "Nurhaci" at HighBeam.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-Nurhaci.html   (245 words)

  
 John Hawks Anthropology Weblog
We suggest that the lineage was spread by Qing Dynasty (16441912) nobility, who were a privileged elite sharing patrilineal descent from Giocangga (died 1582), the grandfather of Manchu leader Nurhaci, and whose documented members formed 0.4% of the minority population by the end of the dynasty.
This dynasty was founded by Nurhaci (1559-1626) and was dominated by the Qing imperial nobility, a hereditary class consisting of male-line descendants of Nurhaci's paternal grandfather, Giocangga (died 1582), with >80,000 official members by the end of the dynasty (Elliott 2001).
A social mechanism was thus established that would have led to the increase of the specific Y lineage carried by Giocangga and Nurhaci and to its spread into a limited number of populations.
www.johnhawks.net /weblog/reviews/genetics/china   (2444 words)

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