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Topic: Ohlone Indians


  
 An Overview of Ohlone Culture
This group of Indians consisted of approximately forty different tribelets ranging in size from 100-250 members, and was scattered throughout the various ecological regions of the greater Bay Area (Kroeber, 1953).
In 1841, Indians from Tulare and Sacramento came as a regular cinnabar expedition to the quarry and one of the intruders was killed by the Santa Clara Ohlones.
Ohlone culture is seen in this ethnographic sketch as a world in which the people had a close physical and psychological bond to the environment and to the customs of a small society.
www.santacruzpl.org /history/spanish/ohlone.shtml   (1518 words)

  
 Castro Valley Histrory Page1
The Ohlone or Coastanoan Indians (meaning coast people, as they primarily lived along the bay and delta) were the first people to reside in the area we now call Castro Valley.
A death brought enormous grief to the Ohlones and was cermoniously observed by wailing and tears from family and villagers both near and far.
A decree forced the Indians from the mission, the land fell into neglect and the buildings were plundered.
www.mycastrovalley.com /history/page01.html   (528 words)

  
 InfoDome - California Indians and Their Reservations
The Nomlaki Indians are a division of the Penutian-speaking Wintun Indians of the Sacramento Valley region.
The Muwekma Ohlone Tribe was federally recognized as the Verona Band of Alameda County.
The Patwin Indians are a division of the Penutian-speaking Wintun Indians of the Sacramento Valley region.
infodome.sdsu.edu /research/guides/calindians/calinddictmp.shtml   (3309 words)

  
 Village Life of the Ohlone Indians
Ohlone people were very respectful of their environment.
The Ohlones traded shell beads and abalone shells which were plentiful in their community.
The hills near the Ohlone villages were filled with oak trees.
www.wccusd.k12.ca.us /ohlone/village.htm   (1019 words)

  
 The City of Belmont, CA - The Ohlone Indians
The Ohlone Indians were an Indian tribe that lived in the Bay Area before the Europeans arrived.
The Ohlone Indians were sedentary, but moved to different areas for things like an acorn harvest, which needed the whole tribe to help with.
The tools that the Ohlone Indians used were bows and arrows for hunting, which were made of yew, and the bowstrings were made of sinew or vegetable fiber.
www.belmont.gov /subContent.asp?CatId=240001203   (724 words)

  
 Who We Are   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-15)
The California Indian Museum will tell this story, because it is a story that just may untie us from the bonds of racism and hatred, and may give the children of California and the world an opportunity to appreciate and respect each other.
The purpose of the California Indian Museum and Cultural Center is to culturally enrich and benefit the people of California and the general public.
The goals of the Museum and Cultural Center are to educate the public about California Indian history and cultures, to showcase California Indian cultures, to enhance and facilitate these cultures and traditions through educational and cultural activities, to preserve and protect California Indian cultural and intellectual properties, and to develop relationships with other indigenous groups.
cimcc.indian.com /who.htm   (572 words)

  
 Ohlone Indians   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-15)
The Ohlone Indians refer to the native Californians who inhabited the San Francisco and Monterey Bay area prior to thearrival of the Europeans.
The Ohlones were a bioregional group sharing a common linguistic backgroundrather than an organized tribe.
The Ohlones spoke related languages in the Penutian linguistic family that were about as close as the languages of the Romance family,i.e.
www.therfcc.org /ohlone-indians-333035.html   (224 words)

  
 City of Fremont - 1. The Ohlone People
The Ohlones gathered a variety of plants, seeds, berries, roots, and nuts for food.
The Ohlones maintained their culture by passing on stories, songs, dances, and tribal laws from parents to children.
The Ohlone way of life minimized warfare and ensured the health of the land.
www.ci.fremont.ca.us /AboutFremont/History/OhlonePeople.htm   (266 words)

  
 Monterey County Historical Society, Local History Pages--From Peace To Present: A Look at the Ohlone Indians
Accounts of the first contacts between the Spanish and the Ohlone recount that the natives were "amazed and confused," but upon perceiving they were not in any apparent danger, they became excited at the prospect of interacting with the strangers, bringing gifts and sending for their friends and family to come.
The claims of the Indians came long before those of Mexican, Spanish, and Americans, but the Indians were unaware of the act or what it meant to them and the state refused to perform its legal duty and file on their behalf.
Unfortunately because the Ohlone are not recognized by the federal government as a tribe, they are not eligible to take out loans in order to improve their situation because they do not have a legal title to their land on the allotments.
www.mchsmuseum.com /ohlonepeace.html   (3396 words)

  
 The Muwekma Ohlone Tribe of the San Francisco Bay and
In simplistic terms, it appears in general that the Ohlone attitude towards the presence of strangers entering their territories was divided into two general considerations: strangers were considered as either enemies (and/or other powerful forces that could cause harm), or as distinguished visiting guests.
During the mid-19th century, as the rest of the central California Indian tribal groups were displaced and, at times, hunted down, Alisal (located near Pleasanton) as well as the other rancherias, became safe-havens for the Muwekma Ohlone Indians and members from the neighboring interior tribes who had intermarried with them at the missions.
The Ohlone people have left a record of approximately 13,000 years of human history, and today they are still trying to overcome the onus of their sentence of "extinction" placed upon them by scholars, politicians, and anti-Indian activists, by continuing to educate the general public, academic institutions and the Federal Government through the historic record.
www.islaiscreek.org /ohlonehistcultfedrecog.html   (3804 words)

  
 Learning about the Ohlone Indians   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-15)
It was interesting to learn about the many different animals, plants and trees that live in the area and how the Ohlone made use of these resources in their everyday lives.
This is an assortment of different kinds of foods, nuts, berries, and spices used by the Ohlone Indians.
Our guide is showing us how the Ohlone Indian men would use the piece of bone to scrape their skin after getting out of the sweat house.
www.moreland.k12.ca.us /Discovery/roommorse/ohlone-new/ohlone-new.html   (428 words)

  
 The Muwekma Ohlone   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-15)
During the mid-19th century, as the rest of the central California Indians were displaced and at times hunted down, Alisal (located near Pleasanton) as well as the other rancherias became safe-havens for the Muwekma Ohlone Indians and members from the interior tribes who had intermarried with them at the missions.
During the early part of this century, the Muwekma Ohlone Indians (later known as the Verona Band) became Federally Recognized as a result of the Special Indian census conducted by Agent C. Kelsey in 1905-1906 and the ensuing Congressional appropriation bills of 1906 and 1908 addressing the purchase of homesites for landless California Indians.
The Ohlone people have left a record of approximately 13,000 years of human history, and today they are trying to overcome the onus of their sentence of "extinction" by continuing to educate the general public, academic institutions and the Federal Government.
www.muwekma.org /history/history_05.html   (1352 words)

  
 Urban renewal atop sacred past / Ohlone protest Emeryville project
"Ohlone Indians are still alive and continue to live in the Bay Area," Matlock said.
An archaeologist slipped in between bites to recover the remains of 700 Ohlone, which are still in storage at UC Berkeley.
But Katherine Perez of Stockton, who is one-quarter Ohlone, has been designated the "most likely descendant." She has served in that role under a state law requiring land users to tread lightly on American Indian archaeological sites.
sfgate.com /cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2002/11/20/BA236123.DTL   (760 words)

  
 Understanding the Composition of Costanoan Indians   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-15)
On the 1928 BIA applications, the Indians were asked to supply the name of their "Tribe or Band." The majority of these applicants, classified as Costanoan, supplied the name of a mission.
Further, the Indians were asked to supply their grandparents’ names and identify their "Tribe or Band." Again, most often, this question was answered with the name of a specific mission.
Ohlone was decided upon as the "politically correct" terminology and means of identification.
hometown.aol.com /Inammec/Costpaper.html   (2661 words)

  
 History
From 500 BC to 500 AD, the Essalen was displaced by the Ohlone Indians.
There was no Ohlone tribe, such as the Sioux or Cherokee or Suquamish tribal civilizations.
They did not share much but cultural practices and the roots of their languages, which are apparent only to linguists.
www.webdzine.com /monterey/bay_history.shtml   (760 words)

  
 Early History Essay -- Santa Clara County, California -- National Register of Historic Places Travel Itinerary
Historically, the Ohlone Indians were the first documented inhabitants of the Santa Clara Valley region, although the oak lined hills and valley undoubtedly had known earlier Indian inhabitants and migrations, now lost to history and prehistory.
Aside from the Ohlone, who were considered a Coatanoan tribe, the Yokut people dwelt to the east in modern Contra Costa and San Joaquin counties.
We were welcomed by the Indians of the village, whom I estimated at some four hundred persons, with singular demonstrations of joy,singing, and dancing.
www.cr.nps.gov /nr/travel/santaclara/history.htm   (2145 words)

  
 Castro Valley--Ohlone   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-15)
Ohlone culture was as rich as any other with its own food, crafts, music and games.
Ohlone men wore their most elaborate body paint and feathers for dances.
An early European explorer made this drawing of Ohlone in a tule boat on the San Francisco Bay in the year 1816.
www.haywardareahistory.org /ohlone.html   (781 words)

  
 Vizcaíno's Account of the Ohlone   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-15)
Their food consists of seeds which they have in abundance and variety and of the flesh of game, such as deer which are larger than cows, and bear....
The Indians are of good stature and fair complexion, the women being somewhat less in size than the men and of pleasing countenance.
The clothing of the people of the coast consists of the skins of the sea-wolves abounding there, which they tan and dress better than is done in Castile; they possess also, in great quantity, flax like that of Castile, hemp and cotton, from which they make fishing-lines and nets for rabbits and hares.
www.californiahistory.net /3_PAGES/manilla_ohlone.htm   (213 words)

  
 Silicon Valley History Online ::
Introduce the Ohlone culture with a story found in Rumisen Ohlone Stories written and illustrated by Linda Yamane (Oyate, 2702 Mathews Street, Berkeley, CA 94702; 510-848-6700, FAX 510-848-4815; 1995, 44 pages, paperback, storyteller and ancestral story sources bionotes.
You may have one student from each group come up to the front of the class to explain the best picture with that theme and support their position by pointing out details and strengths of the picture.
Homework: Compare the students life with the life of an Ohlone Indian.
www.siliconvalleyhistory.org /lessonplans/ohlone/homepage.html   (443 words)

  
 Web Resources 01   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-15)
The Iroquois Constitution - The Iroquois Confederacy was a loose confederation of the Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga and Seneca Indian tribes of the Eastern Woodlands.
This site is interesting because it covers the history of the area over a period of time, so you can see the changes and how they affected the Ohlone Indians.
Ohlone Indians - This is a good description of the lifestyle of the Ohlone Indians.
www.ouhsd.k12.ca.us /sites/cihs/History/wr01.html   (979 words)

  
 Ohlone Chapter NSDAR
Ohlone Chapter was organized on October 9, 1990.
The Chapter takes its name from the Ohlone Indians who heavily populated the San Francisco Bay area during the time of the American Revolution.
Although there is presently no active tribe of Ohlone Indians in this area, there are numerous preserved Indian sites, burial grounds, and shell mounds available for viewing.
pages.sbcglobal.net /ohlonechapter   (199 words)

  
 Indigenous People of Silicon Valley - Go Milpitas!
Yelamu Ohlone is where San Francisco is today and Puichon Ohlone is where Stanford is, for instance.
This group of Indians consisted of approximately forty different tribelets ranging in size from 100-250 members, and was scattered throughout the various ecological regions of the greater Bay Area.
Author Yamane is a California Rumisen Ohlone, herself a basketweaver and one of the founders (and a current officer) in the large and very active California Indian Basketweavers' Association.
www.gomilpitas.com /historyIndians.htm   (850 words)

  
 InfoDome - California Indians and Their Reservations
The Augustine Reservation of Cahuilla Indians is a one-square mile tract of land, about 500 acres, in the lower Coachella valley, in Riverside County, southern California, near the community of Thermal.
A federal reservation of Western Mono Indians in Fresno County, in the foothills of the Sierras, near the town of Tollhouse.
Colonies are such as the Bridgeport Paiute Indian Colony, the Elem Indian Colony of Pomo Indians, and the Woodfords Indian Colony.
infodome.sdsu.edu /research/guides/calindians/calinddict.shtml   (3792 words)

  
 Redwood Grove   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-15)
This is how the Ohlone women would hold their baskets when they are gathering.
To grind acorns Ohlones used a pistil and a mortar.
This is how the Ohlone indians smash the acorns, by using a rock called a pistil.
www.smfc.k12.ca.us /audubon/redwoodgrove1.html   (347 words)

  
 Ohlone Indians
The Ohlone Indians were only one of many of the Coastanoan tribes (coast people) that lived thousands of years ago.
The Ohlone were called hunters and gatherers because they used natural resources found around where they lived.
This was put into a basket with hot rocks and mixed to make hot must which the Indians ate with their hands.
www1.pvsd.net /PortolaValleyHistory/ohlone.htm   (454 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-15)
The Ohlone and friends got together to build a tule canoe and launch it on Lake Merced in San Francisco in August of 2003.  Check out the pictures of materials and the work involved.
Chitactac Park is a truly remarkable site, for it has managed to survive all of the many land development pressures of the Bay Area.  Kids of all ages love to view the rocks, the petroglyphs, the creek, the ancient oaks, and interpretive areas.  Off Highway 101 in Santa Clara County.
An excellent illustrated introduction to the Ohlone of the Bay Area, from thousands of years ago to the present.  Suitable for younger as well as older students.  Includes pictures and illustrations.
www.nativecc.com /OhloneEd.html   (970 words)

  
 Bibliography: "A Well Looking, Affable People..."
Ohlone: Native Americans of the San Francisco and Monterey Bay Areas.
Examination of attitudes held by Ohlone and other Native Americans towards the desecration of their sacred sites by development and archaeologists.
Gamman, John K. "The Ohlone Indians - People of the West: Their Use of Natural Resources." Student Paper no. ES 144 N, in possession of Department of Special Collections, McHenry Library, University of California Santa Cruz.
www.santacruzpl.org /history/spanish/affbib.shtml   (1220 words)

  
 Links about the Ohlone Indians   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-09-15)
Follow this link for information about Ohlone Indians and a planned museum at the Presidio of San Francisco.
On the other side of the Bay, in Emeryville (next to Oakland), the site of the Ohlone's ancient shellmound (a burial and living area) has recently been taken over and developed into a shopping mall.
Ohlone, which are still in storage at UC Berkeley.
sscl.berkeley.edu /%7Enaruta/SFpresidio/ohlone.html   (946 words)

  
 Sharing Old Ways With The Young
Third and fourth grade curricula mandate that local and state history be taught, and that it include the Indians.
The Indian Village Tour - Any group older than the fourth grade level is scheduled for a 2- 2 1/2 hour tour to an archaeological site in the park which has reconstructions of different types of shelters used by Central California Indians weather permitting.
Following a similar introduction to our Ohlone Indians, the group is divided in half for the half mile walk to the village site.
www.primitiveways.com /teaching_Kidder.html   (1162 words)

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