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Topic: Ojibwa


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In the News (Sun 23 Jun 19)

  
  Ojibwa
At contact, the Ojibwa subsisted by hunting, fishing and gathering, resided in conical or dome-shaped birchbark dwellings, wore animal-skin clothing and travelled by birchbark CANOE in warm weather and SNOWSHOES in winter.
Ojibwa religion was animistic, the natural world being inhabited by numerous spirits both good and evil, some of which required special treatment.
The harsher environment of the coniferous forests of northern Ontario and Manitoba was exploited by the Northern Ojibwa.
www.thecanadianencyclopedia.com /index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0005903   (747 words)

  
  Ojibwa - MSN Encarta
Ojibwa or Chippewa, Native Americans of the Algonquian language family and of the Northeast, Subarctic, and Great Plains culture areas.
The economy of the Ojibwa was based on hunting and fishing, as well as farming corn, beans, and squash, and the gathering of wild fruits and seeds, particularly the abundant wild rice (a plant of the grass family with a seed resembling rice).
Ojibwa mythology was elaborate; the chief religious and superstitious rites centered around the Medewiwin, or Grand Medicine Society.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761563414/Ojibwa.html   (776 words)

  
 Ojibwa. Books: Complete, Annotated List.
I found this text to be useful to provide general background to the culture and views of the Ojibwa.
This book was informative in the part of the Ojibwa's tradition and how they look at the present status of the world and its environment.
It is full of Ojibwa history and narratives that have been passed down through moral tradition.
www.stthomas.edu /justpeace/ojibwa24.htm   (4504 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Ojibwe
The Ojibwa were part of a long term alliance with the Ottawa and Potawatomi First Nations, called the Council of Three Fires and which fought with the Iroquois Confederacy and the Sioux.
The Ojibwa allied themselves with the French in the French and Indian War, and with the British in the War of 1812.
Most Ojibwa, except for the Plains bands, lived a sedentary lifestyle, engaging in fishing, hunting, the farming of maize and squash, and the harvesting of Manoomin (wild rice).
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Ojibwe   (660 words)

  
 Ojibwa   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
At contact, the Ojibwa subsisted by hunting, fishing and gathering, resided in conical or dome-shaped birchbark dwellings, wore animal-skin clothing and travelled by birchbark CANOE in warm weather and SNOWSHOES in winter.
Ojibwa religion was animistic, the natural world being inhabited by numerous spirits both good and evil, some of which required special treatment.
The Ojibwa participated in the occasional multitribal FEAST OF THE DEAD at which furs and trade goods were distributed.
www.canadianencyclopedia.ca /index.cfm?PgNm=TCE&Params=A1ARTA0005903   (747 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for Ojibwa
The Ojibwa were hunters and fishers as well as subsistence farmers, and were constantly feuding with the Sioux.
Originally united with the Ottawa and the Ojibwa, these semi-sedentary hunter-farmers were driven by the Sioux se from Wisconsin, migrating as far as Indiana before being driven w by white settlers.
Ojibwa buckskin jacket with beaded decoration is in the collection of the National Museum of the American Indian in Suitland, Maryland.
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=Ojibwa   (672 words)

  
 Ojibwa
According to the 1990 census, the Ojibwa were the third-largest Native group (with a population of 104,000), after the Cherokee (308,000) and the Navajo (219,000).
Ojibwa culture is currently experiencing a renaissance as natives and non-natives are studying Ojibwa botany, crafts, myths, and religion.
Ojibwa babies were wrapped in swaddling until they were one year old, then kept in cradle boards—rectangular wooden frames with a backrest or curved headboard to protect the baby's head, and a footrest.
www.everyculture.com /multi/Le-Pa/Ojibwa.html   (8090 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Chippewa Indians
The popular name is a corruption of Ojibwa, a name of uncertain etymology, but generally supposed to refer to the "puckered up" appearance of the seam along the front of the tribal moccasin.
By the end of the eighteenth century the Ojibwa were the almost unchallenged owners of nearly all of the present
Notwithstanding their importance as a tribe the Ojibwa are not prominent in colonial history, owing chiefly to their remote situation.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/03690a.htm   (1103 words)

  
 [No title]
But the Ojibwa attained their greatest popularity through the use of Schoolcraft's material by Longfellow in his famous poem of Hiawatha, for while the name Hiawatha is drawn from Iroquois sources, the stories are nearly all Ojibwa.
According to Dunning (1959: 5), the Northern and Southern Ojibwa may be differentiated on the grounds of ecology and social structure, although both were characterized by exogamous patrilineal sibs and cross-cousin marriage.
The area of the Northern Ojibwa extends in the northeast to the headwaters of the river systems flowing into the western side of James Bay, while in the west it is bounded roughly by Lake Winnipeg and its river systems.
lucy.ukc.ac.uk /EthnoAtlas/Hmar/Cult_dir/Culture.7862   (864 words)

  
 Ojibwa - RecipeFacts   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
The language of the Ojibwa, which many of whom still speak the Ojibwe language known as Anishinaabemowin or Ojibwemowin, belongs to the Algonquian linguistic group, and is descended from Proto-Algonquian.
The legend of the Ojibwa "Windigo," in which tribesmen supposedly identify with a mythological cannabalistic monster and prey on their families is mentioned in the fiction of Thomas Pynchon.
The Ojibwa have a number of spiritual beliefs passed down by oral tradition under the Midewiwin teachings.
www.recipeland.com /facts/Chippewa   (1962 words)

  
 Ojibwa - Chippewa - Crystalinks
The Ojibwa were part of a long term alliance with the Ottawa and Potawatomi First Nations, called the Council of Three Fires and which fought with the Iroquois Confederacy and the Sioux.
The Ojibwa allied themselves with the French in the French and Indian War, and with the British in the War of 1812.
Most Ojibwa, except for the Plains bands, lived a sedentary lifestyle, engaging in fishing, hunting, the farming of maize and squash, and the harvesting of Manoomin (wild rice).
www.crystalinks.com /ojibwa.html   (1376 words)

  
 Ojibwa or Chippewa
Ojibwa, North American tribe, of the Algonquian language family and of the Eastern Woodlands culture area.
According to Ojibwa tradition, the tribe originally emigrated from the region of the St. Lawrence River in the east, in company with the related Ottawa and Potawatomi.
They were divided into four groups, or tribes: the Ojibwas of the Lake Superior region; the Mississaugas of Manitoulin Island and of the mainland around the Mississagi River; the Ottawas of the Georgian Bay area; and the Potawatomis, who lived on the west side of Lake Huron in what is now Michigan.
www.angelfire.com /realm/shades/nativeamericans/ojibwa.htm   (744 words)

  
 Native American Society
In the spring, families would camp near groves of maple trees and tap them for the sap, which was boiled down and used for syrup and sugar.
Ojibwa women did most of the fishing, except in winter when the men would spear fish through the ice.
Even today the Ojibwa are still involved in long-running court cases against the United States government in regard to their land, much of which was seized for nonpayment of taxes many, many years ago despite the fact original treaties seem to indicate no taxes would ever be levied.
thewildwest.org /interface/index.php?action=200   (572 words)

  
 Ojibwa. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
In 1736 the Ojibwa obtained their first foothold E of Lake Superior, and after a series of engagements with the Iroquois, they obtained the peninsula between Lake Huron and Lake Erie.
Traditionally the Ojibwa, except for the Plains Ojibwa, were a fairly sedentary people who depended for food on fishing, hunting (deer), farming (corn and squash), and the gathering of wild rice.
The Ojibwa had a unique form of picture writing that was intimately connected with the religious and magico-medical rites of the Midewiwin society.
www.bartleby.com /65/oj/Ojibwa.html   (474 words)

  
 MrDonn.org - Woodland Ojibwa Chippewa Daily Life in Olden Times, Customs, Indian Lore, Native Americans
The Ojibwa and Chippewa are not only the same tribe; they are the same word, pronounced a little differently.
The Ojibwa, for example, made their wigwams by covering a wood frame with hide and then covering the hide with bark.
When an Ojibwa family arrived at a summer village, one of the first things they did was to select a frame from whatever frames were still available.
nativeamericans.mrdonn.org /ojibwa.html   (2975 words)

  
 DNK Amazon Store :: Ojibwa Warrior: Dennis Banks And The Rise Of The American Indian Movement
Ojibwa Warrior is an autobiography and first hand account of the formation and rise of the American Indian Movement told by one of its founders, Dennis Banks.
Banks' book, Ojibwa Warrior, is a multi-dimensional account of the history of racism and empire in the United States which should be of great interest not only to historians but also to anthropologists, philosophers, ecologists and especially social and environmental activists.
Banks was born into an economically poor yet culturally rich environment where he and his family lived close to the land and relied on natural foods to supplement their scarce and unhealthful government rations.
www.entertainmentcareers.net /book/ProductDetails.aspx?asin=080613691X   (1370 words)

  
 The Plains Cree by David G. Mandelbaum   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
Although the Ojibwa recognize sib lineage, it does not greatly affect the band organization.
Ojibwa councils are composed of the principal men of the band.
According to Skinner, the word was taken by the Menomini from the Ojibwa, who in turn got it from the Sioux.
www.schoolnet.ca /aboriginal/Plains_Cree/part16-e.html   (1303 words)

  
 Ojibwa - Search Results - ninemsn Encarta
Ojibwa, Native American people, of the Algonquian language family and of the Eastern Woodlands culture area.
As Napoleon’s empire collapsed in Europe, Britain made plans to send veteran regiments that had fought in Spain in the Peninsular War to America.
The principal Native American tribes in Michigan when the first Europeans arrived were the Ojibwa, Ottawa, Miami, Potawatomi, and Wyandot, or Huron....
au.encarta.msn.com /Ojibwa.html   (133 words)

  
 Ojibwa, Wisconsin Garden and Plant Nurseries
Below is our comprehensive list of Ojibwa, Wisconsin nurseries.
For more nurseries in the Ojibwa area of Wisconsin, choose a city from the list on the right.
W8869 River Rd Ojibwa, WI 1 mile from center of Ojibwa.
www.gardenguides.com /resources/nurseries/nurseries-city.asp?dest=Ojibwa+WI   (142 words)

  
 Ojibwa - What is definition of the term - Ojibwa ?   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
The Ojibwa, Aanishanabe or Chippewa (also Ojibwe, Ojibway, Chippeway, Anishinaabe, or Anishinabek) are the largest group of Native Americans/First Nations north of Mexico, including MĂ©tis.
Marie, at the outlet of Lake Superior, the French referred to them as Saulteurs; Ojibwa who subsequently moved to the Prairie provinces of Canada have retained the name Saulteaux.
The Ojibwa, many of whom still speak the Ojibwe language known as Anishinaabemowin or Ojibwemowin, which belongs to the Algonquian linguistic group, are related to the Ottawa and Cree.
www.linguasphere.org /dictionary/n-50818-Ojibwa.html   (282 words)

  
 Ojibwa Indians
Ojibwa warriors fought with the French against the British in the French and Indian War.
General Anthony Wayne defeated the Ojibwas, who fought alongside the Indians of the Ohio Country at the Battle of Fallen Timbers.
Rather, the Ojibwas lost some of their territory in Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and North Dakota, but the Indians retained much of this land as reservations.
www.ohiohistorycentral.org /entry.php?rec=2090   (268 words)

  
 Camp Ojibwa for Boys   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-02)
A kid should choose to attend Camp Ojibwa because he will learn to become a man. Ojibwa is not just a place where boys learn how to become better athletes, but better teamates, better friends, and better people.
Ojibwa is a place where boys grow, develop their independence, and learn to cooperate with others, and this is mostly due to the consistently amazing Ojibwa family.
Only at Ojibwa will you have such vivid memories of a story told by a counselor when you were 11 that you still laugh at as a 19 year old.
www.campojibwa.com /why.php   (672 words)

  
 Ojibwa Sewn Beads Lesson -- Illinois State Museum
Objectives: Students will recognize and describe the sewn beading style of the Ojibwa tribe that was influenced by seventeenth-century French floral embroidery and fabric prints imported by the French traders.
Students will adapt and recreate a hand-sewn Ojibwa bead motif on felt using seed beads similar to those in the Museum's collections of trade beads and beaded objects, demonstrating beading skills.
Ojibwa Indian floral bead designs incorporated stems, leaves, and flowers into fanciful patterns that fit the shape of the object being beaded.
www.museum.state.il.us /ismdepts/anthro/beads/sewn_beads_lesson.html   (935 words)

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