Factbites
 Where results make sense
About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   PR   |   Contact us  

Topic: Old English language


Related Topics

In the News (Sun 19 Nov 17)

  
  Old English language - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century.
Old English was not static, and its usage covered a period of approximately 700 years – from the Anglo-Saxon migrations that created England in the fifth century to some time after the Norman invasion of 1066, when the language underwent a major and dramatic transition.
The language was further altered by the transition away from the runic alphabet (also known as futhorc or fuþorc) to the Latin alphabet, which was also a significant factor in the developmental pressures brought to bear on the language.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Old_English_language   (2699 words)

  
 Old English language - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Old English was not static, and its usage covered a period of approximately 700 years – from the Anglo-Saxon migrations which created England in the fifth century to some time after the Norman invasion of 1066, after which the language underwent a major and dramatic transition.
The language was further altered by the transition away from the runic alphabet (also known as futhorc) to the Latin alphabet, which was also a significant factor in the developmental pressures brought to bear on the language.
Old English words were spelt as they were pronounced; the silent letters of Modern English therefore did not often exist in Old English.
www.arikah.net /encyclopedia/Ang   (2685 words)

  
 Old English language
Old English, a variant of West Germanic, in its older form, Old Saxon, was spoken by certain Germanic peoples (Angles, Saxons, and Jutes) of the regions comprising present-day southern Denmark and northern Germany who invaded Britain in the 5th century AD; the Jutes were the first to arrive, in 449, according to tradition.
The four major dialects recognized in Old English are Kentish, originally the dialect spoken by the Jutes; West Saxon, a branch of the dialect spoken by the Saxons; and Northumbrian and Mercian, subdivisions of the dialects spoken by the Angles.
Old English was an inflected language characterized by strong and weak verbs; a dual number for pronouns (for example, a form for "we two" as well as "we"), two different declensions of adjectives, four declensions of nouns, and grammatical distinctions of gender.
members.tripod.com /babaev/tree/oenglish.html   (447 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon) was an early form of the English language that existed in England some 1000 years ago.
During the 700 years in which it was in use it assimilated some aspects of the indigenous pre-Celtic languages, some of the Celtic languages which it came into contact with, some of the two variants of the invading Scandinavian languages occupying and controlling the Danelaw, and Norman French in the wake of 1066.
The language was further altered by the transition away from the runic futhark alphabet to the Latin alphabet, which was also a significant factor in the developmental pressures brought to bear on the language.
wikiwhat.com /encyclopedia/o/ol/old_english_language.html   (1204 words)

  
 English Language - MSN Encarta
Old English, a variant of West Germanic, was spoken by certain Germanic peoples (Angles, Saxons, and Jutes) of the regions comprising present-day southern Denmark and northern Germany who invaded Britain in the 5th century ad.
The four major dialects recognized in Old English are Kentish, originally the dialect spoken by the Jutes; West Saxon, a branch of the dialect spoken by the Saxons; and Northumbrian (see Northumberland) and Mercian (see Mercia), subdivisions of the dialects spoken by the Angles.
Midland, the dialect of Middle English derived from the Mercian dialect of Old English, became important during the 14th century, when the English counties in which it was spoken developed into centers of university, economic, and courtly life.
encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761564210_2/English_Language.html   (1480 words)

  
 Old English language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Unlike modern English Old English was a language rich with morphological diversity and was still pronounced basically as It maintained several distinct cases: the nominative dative accusative genitive and instrumental remnants of which survive only in few pronouns today.
The language was further altered by the away from the runic alphabet (also known futhark) to the Latin alphabet which was also a significant factor the developmental pressures brought to bear on language.
Old English was at first written in but shifted to the Latin alphabet with some additions: the letter yogh adopted from Irish ; and three runes : thorn eth and wynn.
www.freeglossary.com /Old_English   (2934 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Old English language Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Unlike modern English, Old English was a language rich with morphological diversity, and was still pronounced basically as spelled.
Old English was at first written in runes, but shifted to the Latin alphabet with some additions: the letter yogh, adopted from Irish; and three runes: thorn, eth, and wynn.
Old English nouns were declined -- that is, the ending of the noun changed to reflect its function in the sentence.
www.ipedia.com /old_english_language.html   (2983 words)

  
 Old English language - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century.
Old English was not static, and its usage covered a period of some 700 years – from the Anglo-Saxon migrations into England of the fifth century to some time after the Norman invasion of 1066, when the language underwent a major and dramatic transition.
The term Old English does not strictly refer to older varieties of Modern English such as are found in Shakespeare or the King James Bible, which are called Early Modern English by linguists.
www.biocrawler.com /biowiki/Old_English   (4466 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Old English language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon) is an early form of the English language spoken in England some 1000 years ago.
The language was further altered by the transition away from the runic alphabet (also known as "futhark") to the Latin alphabet, which was also a significant factor in the developmental pressures brought to bear on the language.
Additionally, Old English pronouns reserve the dual form (which is specifically for talking about groups of two things, eg "we two" or "you two" or "they two").
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Old_English_language   (2555 words)

  
 Old English at the University of Calgary
Attention students enrolled in English 401 for the Fall term 2004: please e-mail the instructor, Dr. McGillivray, at mmcgilli@ucalgary.ca with your name and the e-mail address you will use for this course if you will not be using the address that you have on file with the University of Calgary.
This is the home of English 401 and English 403, University of Calgary courses in the Old English language and Old English literature constructed by Murray McGillivray.
Old English is the name given to the germanic language spoken in the southern part of the island of Britain before the Norman Conquest in 1066 c.e.
www.ucalgary.ca /UofC/eduweb/engl401   (384 words)

  
 Old English Language Grammar by Cyril Babaev
One of the main phonological and morphological instruments in Common Germanic and practically in all Germanic languages was the Ablaut, the vowel interchange in the root of nouns and verbs.
Old English, as well as practically all Germanic tongues, is not conservative at all: it witnessed quite an extensive use of analytic forms in place of older inflections and lost many others.
But then, oddly, Old English must have "recalled" this archaic instrumental, even though it was to exist for not too long a time and disappeared as early as the 10th century, even before the Norman conquest and subsequent transformation of the English language into its Middle stage.
indoeuro.bizland.com /project/grammar/grammar41.html   (4232 words)

  
 THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE -- OLD ENGLISH NOTES: (ANGLO-SAXON)
English is the most widely spoken of the Western Germanic languages, both in number of native speakers and in geographical distribution.
Old English, the ancestor of Modern English originated from the very similar dialects that were spoken by the Germanic tribes which invaded the Celtic island of Britain as of 449 A.D.
In Old English however it would be possible to put the object before the subject without changing the meaning of the sentence, because the case endings would still unambiguously mark the subject and object.
www.geocities.com /Athens/Column/1122/OEHIST.htm   (4913 words)

  
 Old English language - Gurupedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon) is an early form of the English language which was spoken in
Old English was at first written in runes, but shifted to the Latin alphabet with some additions: the letter
Old English is not dependent upon S (subject), V (verb), O (object) or "SVO" word order in the way that Modern English is. The syntax of an Old English sentence can be in any of these shapes: SVO order, VSO order, and
www.gurupedia.com /o/ol/old_english_language.htm   (2916 words)

  
 Old English Language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Old English is a Germanic language, brought to England by the Anglo-Saxons.
This one is the standard text for learning the Old English language, the first two parts teaching the language and Anglo-Saxon culture and history, and the third part a compilation of the ancient texts for you to practice with and enjoy.
While not focused on Old English, this new book traces the etymology of over 11,000 English words and phrases - how and where they were first used - along with colorful descriptions of original usage in their cultural context.
www.heartoglory.com /medieval/old-english-language.php   (562 words)

  
 Old English Pages: Language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Old English, Middle English and Modern English are terms used by modern scholars to segment a continuum of language change which begins sometime after the 5th-century Germanic settlements in Britain.
Inscriptions also offer evidence for Early Old English: for example, minting of coins began in the early 7th century (Mitchell and Reeds 1996), and early post-invasion runic inscriptions are found on objects such as cremation urns, sword pommels, and brooches (Page 1987).
Old English is a Germanic language, and hence an Indo-European language.
www.georgetown.edu /cball/oe/oe-language.html   (180 words)

  
 Old & Middle English Language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Some of the gravest errors in the teaching of English came as the result of some pedagogue somewhere not knowing that the English Language is a Germanic derived language rather than a Latin derived.
Old English, the language of the Angles, Saxons, and Jutes of the 4th Century A.D. is substantively identical with Old High German, the grand ancestor of the modern Germanic languages of Europe.
English (Angle-ish) has been heavily influenced by a variety of tongues, not the least of which was Norman French, brought to the British Isles in the 11th Century by the followers of William the Conqueror.
home.comcast.net /~niggle85/omelanglit.html   (206 words)

  
 Old English Fonts, Old English Software - Mac, Old English Software - Windows, Old English System,
In tracing the historical development of the English language, it is customary to divide it into three periods: Old English, which dates from earliest times to 1150; Middle English, 1150-1500; and Modern English, 1500 to the present.
The history of the English language may be said to have begun with the arrival in Britain of three Germanic tribes about the middle of the 5th century.
in the case of English it was the arrival in Britain of a small Germanic tribe from an "angle" of land on the Continent.
www.worldlanguage.com /Languages/OldEnglish.htm   (1535 words)

  
 Old English language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Once a conglomerate of tribal dialects spoken by Angles, Saxons and Jutes on their invasion in Britain, the Old English language was formed after England was unified by Alfred in the 9th century.
Significant changes which the Old English phonetics undertook, included various mutations; a lot of diphthongs were formed.
The multinational lexicon of English began to shape in the Old period, and finally made English a language with 70% of foreign words in it.
indoeuro.bizland.com /tree/germ/oenglish.html   (484 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Introduction to Old English: Books: Peter S. Baker   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Baker's "Introduction to Old English" is probably the best book for a person to use who has no previous experience with either Old English or traditional linguistics.
The Old English "Magic Sheet" is a tool that students will find invaluable in their initial approach to Anglo-Saxon Literature.
Introduction to Old English proves to be not only an exceedingly effective primer with regard to Anglo-Saxon literature, but an invaluable reference to accompany further readings and studies within the context of the language.
www.amazon.com /Introduction-Old-English-Peter-Baker/dp/0631234543   (1825 words)

  
 Old English? - UsingEnglish.com ESL Forum
I am sure I still make grammar mistakes in modern English and it may seem proud of me to try and write poetry using old English, but It would be great if I could have this text corrected by someone who is well-qualified to do so...
I found a website which is supposed to present "old English" rules but it seems not to be reliable according to your answer...
Old English and Middle English spelling and word order are a bit different from Modern English, what we speak today.
www.usingenglish.com /forum/ask-teacher/13571-old-english.html   (580 words)

  
 Old English language - The Lord of the Rings Wiki   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-31)
Tolkien was a professional linguist and a specialist in the Old English language.
Tolkien rendered Rohirric, related to an older form of Westron, by Old English.
Tolkien gave courses in Old English heroic verse, history of English, various Old English and Middle English texts, Old and Middle English philology, introductory Germanic philology, Gothic, Old Icelandic, and Medieval Welsh.
lotr.wikia.com /wiki/Old_English_language   (95 words)

Try your search on: Qwika (all wikis)

Factbites
  About us   |   Why use us?   |   Reviews   |   Press   |   Contact us  
Copyright © 2005-2007 www.factbites.com Usage implies agreement with terms.