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Topic: Old Italic alphabet


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In the News (Sun 19 Nov 17)

  
  NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Old Italic alphabet
The alphabets derive from Euboean Greek Cumaean alphabet, used at Ischia and Cumae in the Bay of Naples in the eighth century BC.
This classical alphabet remained in use until the 2nd century BC when it began to be contaminated by the rise of the Latin alphabet.
The Latin alphabet spread from Italy, along with the Latin language, to the lands surrounding the Mediterranean Sea with the expansion of the Roman Empire.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Old-Italic-alphabet   (3073 words)

  
  Latin alphabet - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
It is generally held that the Latins adopted the western variant of the Greek alphabet in the 7th century BC from Cumae, a Greek colony in southern Italy.
Old English, for example, was rarely written with even proper nouns capitalised; whereas Modern English of the 18th century had frequently all nouns capitalised, in the same way that Modern German is today, e.g.
The Latin alphabet spread from Italy, along with the Latin language, to the lands surrounding the Mediterranean Sea with the expansion of the Roman Empire.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Latin_alphabet   (2260 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Runic alphabet
In old Scandinavian belief, the runes were of divine origin (Old Norse: reginkunnr) and this is attested as early as on the c.
An Old Italic or "North Etruscan" thesis is supported by the inscription on the Negau helmet dating to the 2nd century BC (Markey 2001).
The letters of the Gothic alphabet, however, as given by the Alcuin manuscript (9th century), are obviously related to the names of the Futhark.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Runic_alphabet   (4068 words)

  
 Alphabet
The word alphabet itself is derived from alpha and beta, the first two symbols of the Greek alphabet.
Among alphabets, one may distinguish the older abjads that only recorded consonants, and the newer alphabet of the Greek type called simply alphabet and the abugida.
Alphabetic material was uncovered at Serabit el-Khadem in Sinai in 1905 and at Ugarit in Syria in 1929.
www.guajara.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/a/al/alphabet.html   (1024 words)

  
 Latin alphabet - Facts, Information, and Encyclopedia Reference article
In the course of its history, the Latin alphabet was adapted for use for new languages, some of which had phonemes which were not used in languages previously written with this alphabet, and therefore extensions were created as needed.
With the spread of Western Christianity the Latin alphabet spread to the peoples of northern Europe who spoke Germanic languages, displacing their earlier Runic alphabets, as well as to the speakers of Baltic languages, such as Lithuanian and Latvian, and several (non-Indo-European) Finno-Ugric languages, most notably Hungarian, Finnish and Estonian language.
The Finnish alphabet and collating rules are the same as in Swedish, except for the addition of the letters Š and Ž, which are considered variants of S and Z. In French and English, characters with diaeresis (ä, ë, ï, ö, ü, ÿ) are usually treated just like their un-accented versions.
www.startsurfing.com /encyclopedia/l/a/t/Latin_alphabet.html   (3134 words)

  
 OLD ITALIC ALPHABET FACTS AND INFORMATION
The alphabets derive from Euboean Greek Cumaean alphabet, used at Ischia and Cumae in the Bay of Naples in the eighth century BC.
This classical alphabet remained in use until the 2nd century BC when it began to be contaminated by the rise of the Latin alphabet.
The "Alphabet of Lugano" was used to record Lepontic inscriptions, among the oldest testimonies of any Celtic language, in use from the 7th to the 5th centuries BC.
www.thecorporatereport.com /Old_Italic_alphabet   (641 words)

  
 Alphabet
An alphabet is a small set of letters--basic written symbols--each of which roughly represents or represented historically a phoneme of a spoken language.
The first alphabet was probably developed by the Canaanites around 1700-1500 BC (see early Semitic alphabet), and nearly all subsequent alphabets are derived from it or inspired by it, directly or indirectly.
Of special note among its descendants is the Greek alphabet, which was the first to have separate symbols for vowels (Semitic didn't need them).
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/al/Alphabet.html   (820 words)

  
 Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Phoenician alphabet
The Aramaic alphabet, a modified form of Phoenician, was the ancestor of the modern Arabic and Hebrew scripts, as well as the Brāhmī script, the parent writing system of most modern abugidas in India, Southeast Asia, Tibet, and Mongolia.
The Greek alphabet (and by extension its descendants such as the Latin, the Cyrillic and the Coptic), was a direct successor of Phoenician, though certain letter values were changed to include vowels.
The Cyrillic alphabet was derived from the Greek alphabet.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Phoenician_alphabet   (1414 words)

  
 Old Italic alphabets and languages
The Old Italic alphabets developed from the west Greek alphabet, which came to Italy via the Greek colonies on Sicily and along the west coast of Italy.
It was adapted from the Etruscan alphabet during the 7th century BC.
The Osci adapted the Etruscan alphabet to write their language sometime in the 7th century BC though the earlist known Oscan inscriptions appeared on coins dating from the 5th century BC.
www.omniglot.com /writing/olditalic.htm   (344 words)

  
 Greatest Inventions-- The Alphabet
Sanskrit is written in an alphabet of 53 letters, including the visarga mark for final aspiration and special letters for kš and jñ, though one of the long els is theoretical and not actually used.
Latin alphabet to write all of its own words, but certain letters (such as K, X and W) are retained for the purpose of writing "foreign" words.
Old Persian Empire were written in an essentially alphabetic cuneiform script whose letter forms seem to have been created for the occasion.
www.edinformatics.com /inventions_inventors/alphabet.htm   (2709 words)

  
 I - The Encyclopedia
In Semitic, the letter Yôdh was probably originally a pictogram for an arm with hand, derived from a similar hieroglyph that had the value of a voiced pharyngeal fricative (/ʕ/) in Egyptian, but was reassigned to /j/ (as in English "yoke") by Semites, because their word for "arm" began with that sound.
In the Turkish alphabet, dotted and dotless I are considered separate letters and both have uppercase (I, İ) and lowercase (ı, i) forms.
Some German typefaces of the fraktur or schwabacher types, obsolete since the end of the Second World War, do not necessarily distinguish between the capital I and J. The same character, a 'J' with a top serif of the tilde form, was sometimes used for both.
www.the-encyclopedia.com /description/I   (437 words)

  
 Greek alphabet - an introduction - Citizendium
The Greek alphabet originated as a modification of the Phoenician alphabet and in turn gave rise to the Gothic, Glagolitic, Cyrillic, and Coptic, as well as the Latin alphabet.
Originally there were several variants of the Greek alphabet, most importantly western (Chalcidian) and eastern (Ionic) Greek; the former gave rise to the Old Italic alphabet and thence to the Latin alphabet.
The Coptic alphabet is an uncial form of the Greek alphabet, augmented with several new letters derived from Demotic, and it is still used today, mostly in Egypt.
en.citizendium.org /wiki/Greek_alphabet   (2456 words)

  
 Online Encyclopedia and Dictionary - T
T is the twentieth letter of the modern Latin alphabet.
Tâw was the last letter of the Western Semitic alphabet — and of the Hebrew alphabet.
The sound value of Semitic Taw, Greek alphabet Tαυ (Tau), and Old Italic alphabet and Latin T was IPA.
fact-archive.com /encyclopedia/T   (326 words)

  
 Old Church Slavonic alphabet and language
Old Church Slavonic or Church Slavonic is a literary language which developed from the language used by St Cyril and St Methodius, 9th century missionaries from Byzantium, to translate the bible and other religious works.
Sometime during the 10th century AD a new alphabet appeared which was known as Cyrillic and named after St Cyril, though it was possibly invented by St Kliment of Ohrid.
Old Church Slavonic was used as the liturgical language of the Russian Orthodox church between the 9th and 12th centuries.
www.omniglot.com /writing/ocslavonic.htm   (352 words)

  
 Old Italic alphabet - Definition, explanation
Old Italic refers to a number of related historical Latin-related alphabets used on the Italian peninsula which were used for some non-Indo-European (Etruscan and probably North Picene) languages.
Cumaean, in turn showed strong similarities to the Phoenician alphabet, lending support to theories of Phoenician influence in the West Mediterranean region.
In the alphabets of the West, X had the sound value, Ψ stood for ; in Etruscan: X =, Ψ = or (Rix 202-209).
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/o/ol/old_italic_alphabet.php   (329 words)

  
 Rune LANGUAGE SCHOOL EXPLORER
The Runic alphabets are a set of related alphabets using letters (known as runes), formerly used to write Germanic languages before and shortly after the Christianization of Scandinavia and the British Isles.
The letters of the Gothic alphabet, however, as given by the Alcuin manuscript (9th century), are obviously related to the names of the Futhark.
The alphabet is traditionally called "Marcomannic runes", but it has no connection with the Marcomanni and is rather an attempt of Carolingian scholars to represent all letters of the Latin alphabets with runic equivalents.
www.school-explorer.com /info/Rune   (3676 words)

  
 ENG 346: Aspects of the English Language
For example, Old English had many words and letters that are no longer part of Modern English--words such as scop and letters such as ð, known as an eth.
Furthermore, Old English nouns had different forms according to whether they appeared as the subject of the sentence, direct object, and so on.
Old English continued to change over the centuries, gradually developing into what has come to be known as Middle English.
www.uncp.edu /home/canada/work/markport/language/aspects/spg2003/08oldeng.htm   (1366 words)

  
 Phoenician alphabet : search word
The Samaritan alphabet, used by the Samaritans, is a version of the Paleo-Hebrew alphabet.
It later split off into a number of related alphabets, including the modern Hebrew alphabet, the Syriac alphabet, and the Nabatean alphabet, a highly cursive form that was the origin of the Arabic alphabet.
The Greek alphabet is thought to have developed either directly from the Phoenician alphabet, or to share a common parent in Proto-Sinatic.
www.searchword.org /ph/phoenician-alphabet.html   (791 words)

  
 Ancient Scripts: Alphabet
This alphabet, though, eventually disappeared from the mainstream, and survived as the Samaritan script.
In Israel, it became the "Jewish" alphabet, the direct descendant of which is the modern Hebrew alphabet.
Traditionally the Greeks held that their alphabet was derived from the Phoenician alphabet, and many scholars agree with this as well.
www.ancientscripts.com /alphabet.html   (1403 words)

  
 Alphabet Italic
Balinese alphabet - The Balinese alphabet is a type of alphabet called an abugida that was used to write the Balinese language, an Austronesian language spoken by about three million people on the Indonesian island of Bali.
The use of the Balinese alphabet has mostly been replaced by the Roman alphabet, and very few people are familiar with it.
Moldovan alphabet - The Moldovan alphabet is a Cyrillic alphabet derived from the Russian alphabet and developed for the Romanian/Moldovan language in the Soviet Union in the 1930s.
pl52.mcechess.com /alphabetitalic.html   (1144 words)

  
 Alphabets / Phonemic alphabets
Alphabets, or phonemic alphabets, are sets of letters, usually arranged in a fixed order, each of which represents one or more phonemes, both consonants and vowels, in the language they are used to write.
The word alphabet comes, via the Latin word alphabētum, from the Greek word αλφάβητος (alphabētos), which itself comes from the first two letters of the Greek alphabet, α (άλφα/alpha) and β (βήτα/beta).
The best-known and most widely-used alphabets are the Latin or Roman alphabet and the Cyrillic alphabet, which have been adapted to write numerous languages.
www.omniglot.com /writing/alphabets.htm   (258 words)

  
 Old Italic alphabet Information
From the 6th century, however, there are evolutions of the alphabet, guided by the phonology of the Etruscan language, and letters representing phonemes inexistent in Etruscan are dropped.
By 400 BC, it appears that all of Etruria was using the classical Etruscan alphabet of 20 letters, mostly written from left to right:
O disappears and is replaced by U. In the course of its simplification, the redundant letters showed some tendency towards a syllabary: C, K and Q were predominantly used in the contexts CE, KA, QU.
www.bookrags.com /Old_Italic_alphabet   (751 words)

  
 [No title]
The Old Italic alphabets developed from the west Greek alphabet, which came to Italy via the Greek colonies on Sicily and along the west coast of Italy.
Most of the other alphabets used in Italy are thought to have derived from the Etruscan alphabet.
It was developed in the beginning of the first millennium BC originating from the Phoenician (North Semitic) Alphabet, but with the determinative addition of vowels to an alphabet which up to then included only consonants.
www.lycos.com /info/greek-alphabet--miscellaneous.html   (560 words)

  
 alphabet
The Holundan Kash alphabet originated around 3000 (Cindu) years ago as a syllabary, and some time later was converted to an alphabetic script.
In the old syllabary, each consonant symbol carried an intrinsic vowel a, while small super- or subscript signs were used to indicate different vowel sounds.
In the modern alphabet, as in our Roman one, each symbol represents just that sound; the old vowel signs, enlarged or modified, became "letters" in their own right.
cinduworld.tripod.com /alphabet.htm   (513 words)

  
 Name Plates for Fine Art Ordering Form
Modern, as in the Picasso sample, is a heavy alphabet that goes wonderfully with the abstract, surrealistic style of painting that the name implies.
Italic, as in the Lane sample, is a flourished alphabet that complements seascapes and stronger impressionistic styles.
Bold, as in the Benton sample, is a plain sans serif alphabet that lends itself to simple subject matter and bold colors where anything else would detract from the painting.
www.thegoldleaf.com /nameplates.html   (827 words)

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