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Topic: Old Norse language


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  Verbix -- Germanic languages: conjugate Old Norse verbs   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Old Norse is classical North Germanic language used from roughly 1150 to 1350.
Old Norse is the literary language of the Icelandic sagas, skaldic poems, and Eddas.
Old Norse is the parent language of the three modern languages, Icelandic, Faroese, and Norwegian, and one extinct language called Norn.
www.verbix.com /languages/oldnorse.shtml   (107 words)

  
  Old Norse language - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Old Norse is the Germanic language once spoken by the inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements during the Viking Age, until about 1300.
The Old East Norse dialect was spoken in Denmark and Sweden and settlements in Russia, England and Normandy.
Its modern descendants are the West Norse languages of Icelandic, Norwegian (nynorsk), Faroese and the extinct Norn language of the Orkney and the Shetland Islands as well as the East Scandinavian languages of Swedish, Danish and Norwegian (bokmål/riksmål).
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Old_Norse_language   (2607 words)

  
 Old Norse language, alphabet and pronunciation
Old Norse, the language of the Vikings, is a North Germanic language once spoken in Scandinavia, the Faroe Islands, Iceland, Greenland, and in parts of Russia, France and the British Isles.
The modern language most closely related to Old Norse is Icelandic, the written form of which has changed little over the years, while the spoken form has undergone significant changes.
Between 800 and 1050 AD a division began to appear between East Norse, which developed into Swedish and Danish, and West Norse, which developed into Norwegian, Faroese, Icelandic and Norn, an extinct language once spoken in Shetland, Orkney, and northern parts of Scotland.
www.omniglot.com /writing/oldnorse.htm   (237 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Old Norse language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Old Norse is the Germanic language spoken by the inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements during the Viking Age, until about 1300.
Old Gutnish was the dialect of Old Norse that was spoken on the island of Gotland.
Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon) is an early form of the English language that was spoken in parts of what is now England and southern Scotland between the mid-fifth century and the mid-twelfth century.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Old-Norse-language   (1445 words)

  
 Old Norse language - Encyclopedia.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The terms Old Norse and Old Icelandic are sometimes used interchangeably because Icelandic records of this period are more plentiful and of greater literary value than those in the other Scandinavian languages, but Old Norse also embraces the ancestors of modern Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, and Faroese.
Language and memory: "pre-columbian" America and the social logic of periodization.
The giantess as foster-mother in old Norse Literature.
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1B1-373981.html   (477 words)

  
  Old Norse language: Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com
Unlike modern English, Old English was a language rich with...700 or so years from approximately 450 AD to some time after the Norman invasion in 1066 when the...
Old Norse was the Germanic language once spoken by the inhabitants of the Nordic countries (for instance during the Viking Age).
Its modern descendants are the West Scandinavian languages of Icelandic, Norwegian, Faroese and the extinct Norn language of the Orkney and the Shetland Islands as well as the East Scandinavian languages of Swedish and Danish.
www.encyclopedian.com /ol/Old-Norse.html   (378 words)

  
 Danish_language information. LANGUAGE SCHOOL EXPLORER
Old East Norse is in Sweden called Runic Swedish and in east Denmark Runic Danish, but until the 12th century, the dialect was roughly the same in the two countries.
A change that separated Old East Norse (Runic Swedish/Danish) from Old West Norse was the change of the diphthong æi (Old West Norse ei) to the monophthong e, as in stæin to sten.
Under the Nordic Language Convention, citizens of the Nordic countries speaking Danish have the opportunity to use their native language when interacting with official bodies in other Nordic countries without being liable to any interpretation or translation costs.
language.school-explorer.com /Danish   (2989 words)

  
 Hurstwic: Norse Literature
Old Norse is one of ten branches that make up the Indo-European family of languages which have been spoken throughout Europe and southern Asia for the last 3000 years.
Old Norse is the root language from which the modern Scandinavian languages descended, and is a close relative of modern English, Dutch, and German.
Norse poetry does not have the regular rhythm and end-rhyme that one conventionally associates with poetry, but rather uses alliteration and irregular stress which falls on the most significant words in each line.
www.hurstwic.org /history/articles/literature/text/literature.htm   (4162 words)

  
 Wikinfo | Old English language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
During the 700 years in which it was in use it assimilated some aspects of the indigenous pre-Celtic languages, some of the Celtic languages which it came into contact with, some of the two variants of the invading Scandinavian languages occupying and controlling the Danelaw, and Norman French in the wake of 1066.
The language was further altered by the transition away from the runic alphabet (also known as "futhark") to the Latin alphabet, which was also a significant factor in the developmental pressures brought to bear on the language.
Old English is not dependent upon S (subject), V (verb), O (object) or "SVO" word order in the way that Modern English is. The syntax of an Old English sentence can be in any of these shapes: SVO order, VSO order, and OVS order.
www.wikinfo.org /wiki.php?title=Old_English_language   (2555 words)

  
 ipedia.com: Old English language Article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The language was further altered by the transition away from the runic alphabet (also known as futhark) to the Latin alphabet, which was also a significant factor in the developmental pressures brought to bear on the language.
Old English was at first written in runes, but shifted to the Latin alphabet with some additions: the letter yogh, adopted from Irish; and three runes: thorn, eth, and wynn.
Old English is not dependent upon S (subject), V (verb), O (object) or "SVO" word order in the way that Modern English is. The syntax of an Old English sentence can be in any of these shapes: SVO order, VSO order, and OVS order.
www.ipedia.com /old_english_language.html   (2983 words)

  
 Old Scandinavian (Old Norse) language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The ancestor of all modern Scandinavian languages, Old Scandinavian was a branch of the Common Germanic language spoken by those who migrated north from Central Europe, to the Jutland peninsula and southern Scandinavia.
In the 9th language Old Norse speakers began their migrations through the whole Europe, started to be called Vikings, and therefore the language dialect varieties grew stronger until two separate languages appeared: Western Scandinavian, the ancestor of Norwegian, Icelandic and Faroese, and Eastern Scandinavian, the father-tongue of Danish and Swedish.
The most common features of the North Germanic and Old Norse languages were, for example, the passive vocie ending in -s, an enclitic form of the defonite article and some other.
members.tripod.com /babaev/tree/norse.html   (179 words)

  
 Danish language at AllExperts
This is the approximate extent of Old Norse and related languages in the early 10th century.
The pink area is Old Gutnish and the green area is the extent of the other Germanic languages with which Old Norse still retained some mutual intelligibility.
Old East Norse is in Sweden called Runic Swedish and in Denmark Runic Danish, but until the 12th century, the dialect was the same in the two countries.
en.allexperts.com /e/d/da/danish_language.htm   (2463 words)

  
 Orkneyjar - Norn, the language of Orkney
The sheer scale of the Norse settlement of Orkney saw their language obliterate whatever indigenous language was spoken in Orkney.
Norn remained the language of Orkney until the early 15th century, but, contrary to popular belief, its decline began well before the islands were annexed to Scotland in 1468.
The Norse settled the isles from the 8th century AD onwards and brought with them their own language, Old Norse, which supplanted the Pictish language.
www.orkneyjar.com /orkney/norn.htm   (625 words)

  
 Swedish_language information. LANGUAGE SCHOOL EXPLORER
Standard Swedish is the national language that evolved from the Central Swedish dialects in the 19th century and was well-established by the beginning of the 20th century.
Swedish is an Indo-European language belonging to the North Germanic branch of the Germanic languages.
Swedish is the national language of Sweden and the first language for the overwhelming majority of roughly eight million Swedish born inhabitants and acquired by one million immigrants.
language.school-explorer.com /Swedish   (6177 words)

  
 Rob's Old Norse Page
Old Norse is the language spoken and written by the inhabitants of Scandinavia around 1000 A.D. and earlier.
The modern Nordic languages of Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Icelandic and Faroese descended from Old Norse.
Old English was primarily a spoken language although it did have a written component; runic inscriptions, or runes.
odin.bio.miami.edu /norse   (3003 words)

  
 [No title]
Because the bulk of Old Norse literature was composed (or at the very least transcribed) in Iceland, and because this literature has played a major role in the development of an Icelandic social and political consciousness, we need to learn something of the unique Icelandic experience.
Old Norse dictionaries are hard to use without at least a basic knowledge of grammar, and so we will focus on the basics at first.
The languages are very close, and while it is possible to reconstruct the historical pronunciation of the language in the Middle Ages, that reconstruction is debatable.
www.stanford.edu /dept/english/deptWebFiles/syllabi/1140syllabus.doc   (1080 words)

  
 Proto-Norse language - Definition, explanation
Proto-Norse, Proto-Nordic, Ancient Nordic or Proto-North Germanic was an Indo-European language spoken in Scandinavia that is thought to have evolved from Proto-Germanic between the 1st century BC and the 2nd century, and was spoken until ca 800, when it evolved into the Old Norse language.
In fact this is one of the definitions of Proto-Norse: The uniform north germanic language spoken in prehistoric Scandinavia.
Proto-Norse also had a pitch accent inherited from the Proto-Indo-European language, for all purposes the pitch accent is nothing but a curiousity, though still preserved in modern Swedish and Norwegian.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/p/pr/proto_norse_language.php   (849 words)

  
 Lycos Retriever: Search results for old norse language
The language was in decline by the mid-6th century, due in part to the military defeat of the Goths at the hands of the Franks, the elimination of the Goths in Italy, massive conversion to primarily Latin-speaking Roman Catholicism
Three things are needed for a new dialect to develop: a group of people living in close proximity to each other; this group living in isolation (either geographically or socially) from other groups; and the passage of time.
Tolkien was exposed to languages to a remarkable degree.
lycos.cs.cmu.edu /info/old-norse-language.html   (1021 words)

  
 Norse :: Germanic : RSS Feeds : Rescouces : Gourt   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Proto-Norse language, the Indo-European language in use from 100 B.C. to 800 A.D., predecessor of Old Norse
Old Norse language, the Germanic language in use from 800 A.D. to 1300 A.D. Norse art, Scandinavian art of period 400 A.D. to 1066 A.D. and sometimes of the pre-historic period 1700 B.C. to 500 B.C. More on [ Norse ]
Norse Course - Old Norse for Beginners - A course in the Old Norse language for beginners.
www.dejavu.org /cgi-bin/get.cgi?ver=93&url=http%3A%2F%2Fscience.gourt.com%2FSocial-Sciences%2FLinguistics%2FLanguages%2FNatural%2FIndo-European%2FGermanic%2FNorse.html   (662 words)

  
 Norse Texts and Gods - The Gold Scales
NORSE LITERATURE: A distinction between Icelandic and Norwegian literature is more or less by whim, as the literature of Northmen, or Norsemen (c.
Norse gods excel to a large extent by means of transportation and weaponry, which reflects overriding aspects of Norseman living: very deep needs of weaponry and means of transportation, issues needing to be solved for living all right, etc.
Norse gods are depicted by what they own, their wife, and children, and their names, all of which strongly indicates dominant qualities of the gods.
oaks.nvg.org /an6ra1.html   (1448 words)

  
 Language Translation and Web Page Translation Services
Swedish belongs to the northern or Scandinavian branch of the Germanic languages, a subfamily of Indo-European languages.
The written language, based on two of the most widely spoken dialects, was made uniform throughout all of Sweden in the 14th century.
Because of the significant dialectal changes that occurred during the Viking age (circa 800-1050), Old Norse (or Old Norwegian), a language from which the modern tongue is derived, came into being and was spread by Norwegian migration to Iceland and other areas in the North Atlantic.
thorin.adnc.com /~pheckman/Nordic_Language_bkgrnd.html   (659 words)

  
 Saga in Old Norse Literature: Free Encyclopedia Articles at Questia.com Online Library
in Old Norse literature, especially Icelandic and Norwegian, narrative in prose or verse, centering on a legendary or historical figure or family.
Sagas may be divided into sagas of the kings, mainly of early Norwegian rulers; Icelandic sagas, both biographical and historical; contemporary sagas, which were also Icelandic and were written about living persons; legendary sagas of the distant past; and sagas that were translations of foreign romances.
SAGA, in Old Norse Literature in Old Norse literature, especially...narrative in prose or...aim of the saga, although...translated in Earthly...Icelandic Literature (1957...Icelandic Saga (tr.
www.questia.com /library/encyclopedia/saga-in-old-norse-literature.jsp?l=S&p=1   (1548 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Icelandic language (Language And Linguistics) - Encyclopedia
Spoken chiefly in Iceland, where it is the official language, it stems from Old Norse, the language of the Vikings who settled the island in the 9th cent.
The beginning of the modern period of the Icelandic language may be said to date from the translation of the New Testament in 1540 by Oddur GottskAlksson.
Before that date the language is considered Old Icelandic, which is classified as belonging to the western branch of Old Norse.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/I/IcelndiLan.html   (441 words)

  
 The Faroese Language   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
But where as we have good possibilities of studying the Norwegian and Icelandic languages of an older time, thanks to the large written material which is available, the lack of linguistic sources is a major obstacle to the study of the earliest forms of the Faroese language.
The efforts to restore "Faroese language to its former position", as it was stated after the Christmas meeting, were to cause bitter dispute, politically and culturally, before it was acknowledged officially in 1938 as the language of instruction on the Islands.
As the language of the church it gradually became more common as the texts of the Bible and the rituals were also translated.
www.mundofree.com /islasferoe/thefaroeselanguage.html   (2201 words)

  
 Language
You could say that a culture is defined by their language (but then, how else can you define except in terms of language?).
Old English in Middle-Earth: Tolkien as a gateway to the Anglo Saxons.
Klingon Language Institute deals with a fictional language that was actually developed by a linguist.
www.bmarch.atfreeweb.com /language.htm   (640 words)

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