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Topic: Opabinia


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In the News (Sun 11 Nov 18)

  
  Opabinia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Opabinia is thought to have lived in the soft sediment on the seabed, although it presumably could have swum after prey using its side lobes.
If this were the case, Opabinia would then have folded back the proboscis to bring the food to its mouth on the underside of its head.
Although Opabinia is a relatively minor constituent of the early faunas, it has historical significance because it was one of the first truly unusual animals to be completely studied and described during the redescription of the Burgess shale faunas in the 1970s.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Opabinia   (386 words)

  
 Opabinia
As opabinia swims along the sea floor the proboscis is used to rapidly stir up the sea floor sediment.
Opabinia then folds back the proboscis to bring the food to its mouth on the underside of its head.
Later Opabinia was considered by many to be similar to the trilobites, but this was based on the misinterpretation that the lateral lobes were extensions of a dorsal carapace, which is like the pleurae of trilobites.
www.as.wvu.edu /~kgarbutt/EvolutionPage/Studentsites/Burgesspages/Opabiniapage.html   (279 words)

  
 Station Information - Opabinia
Opabinia is a curious animal found in very early fossil deposits.
Although Opabinia is a relatively minor constituent of the early faunas it has historical significance because it was one of the first truly unusual animals to be completely studied and described when redescription of the Burgess shale faunas was undertaken in the 1970s.
Harry Whittington showed pretty convincingly in 1975 that the animal, previously thought to be an arthropod, was not an arthropod and moreover that it was unlikely that it belonged to any other known phylum.
www.stationinformation.com /encyclopedia/o/op/opabinia.html   (281 words)

  
 Opabinia -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-14)
Opabinia is a curious animal found in early (From 544 million to about 500 million years ago; marine invertebrates) Cambrian fossil deposits.
The head carried an array of five, apparently functional eyes and a long, flexible, hose-like (The human nose (especially when it is large)) proboscis, or snout, which appears to be in no way (Click link for more info and facts about homologous) homologous to the head appendages of any other known contemporary lifeform.
Harry Blackmore Whittington showed convincingly in 1975 that the animal, previously thought to be an arthropod, was indeed not an arthropod, and moreover, that it was unlikely it belonged to any other known ((biology) the major taxonomic group of animals and plants; contains classes) phylum.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/o/op/opabinia.htm   (359 words)

  
 Species Accounts
This specimen of Opabinia regalis displays some of the clear similarities with anomalocarids: elongate, metameric body, bearing lateral swimming lobes, anterior stalked eyes (albeit 5 of them!), ventral mouth, anterior grasping organs (paired and spine-bearing at the distal end), even a dorsal fantail behind the swimming lobes.
Opabinia is a small animal (about 4 cm in length) vs the 25-50 cm length of the larger Anomalocaris specimens.
My reconstruction of Opabinia regalis is very similar, but depicts the fantail arrangement as more compact, and shows the paired appendages at the end of the grasping organ as split medially, rather than dorsoventrally.
www.trilobites.info /species2.html   (848 words)

  
 Evolution Essays 2002
The Opabinia was weird because it had a trunk like elephants and used it to eat with them to.
Opabinia was 5 eyes; this trunk is used for grab the smaller food.
Opabinia had a trunk on its body and it used it to gather food and put it into its mouth.
www.starsandseas.com /SAS_student_work/Evolrprts/EvolessaysS2002.htm   (20585 words)

  
 Opabinia & "Dino-carids"
And the median eye of Opabinia is most likely homologous to the median eye of nauplius larvae in crustaceans.
If and why Opabinia has two pairs of stalked eyes seems to be a mystery to everyone, but one can't rule out the possibility that one pair is homologous to a pair of antennae.
The segmentation in Anomalocarids and Opabinia is very similar, both have biramous limbs (the upper branches modified into swimming flaps), and almost everyone notices the very similar tail fan.
dml.cmnh.org /2001Mar/msg00025.html   (302 words)

  
 Dinopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-14)
Humans are omnivores, most birds are omnivorous, and it is believed that a few dinosaurs had a mixed diet.
Imagine a swimming slug with five eyes on the top of its head and a single arm with its jaw on the end - this is the very peculiar creature known as Opabinia.
Opabinia was a slow swimming, 3-inch-long (8 cm) hunter.
www.jpinstitute.com /dinopedia/dp_az_glossary.jsp?query=o   (497 words)

  
 Opabinia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-14)
The Opabinia has five eyes on its head, two pairs on short stalks and a fifth in the middle.
On top of each lobe except the first one there is a gill near the base of the lobe.
The last three segments of the Opabinia compose the tail, by having thin blade-like lobes which point upward and outward.
library.thinkquest.org /3017/opabinia.htm   (154 words)

  
 Class Dinocarida
Opabinia regalis, Kerygmachela kierkegaardi) into an eventually coherent phylogenetic context" (Minicucci 1999).
Discussion: Opabinia has five eyes at the front of the head and a long, flexible proboscis ending in an array of grasping spines.
The systematic position of Opabinia is very unclear: early interpretations as a branchiopod or as a member of the trilobite clade are almost certainly incorrect.
www.peripatus.gen.nz /Taxa/Arthropoda/Dinocarida.html   (4428 words)

  
 Opabinia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-14)
Although Opabinia is a relatively minor constituent of the early faunas ithas historical significance because it was one of the first truly unusual animals to be completely studied and described whenredescription of the Burgess shale faunas was undertaken in the 1970s.
Harry Whittington showed pretty convincingly in 1975 that theanimal, previously thought to be an arthropod, was not an arthropod and moreover that it was unlikely that it belonged to anyother known phylum.
Taken with two other unexpectedly uniquearthropods Marella and Yohoia that had been previously been described,Opabinia demonstrated that the softbodied Burgess fauna's weremuch more complex and diverse than anyone had suspected.
www.therfcc.org /opabinia-238270.html   (270 words)

  
 The Difference Dictionary:O
Opabinia regalis - Perhaps the most puzzling of all the Burgess shale animals, with five eyes and a spined nozzle for pushing food into its mouth.
Opabinia at the National Museum of Natural History
Opium - Dried exudate of the immature fruits of the opium poppy, first cultivated in Asia Minor, but now spread to suitable climates (and some that are not) around the world.
www.sff.net /people/Gunn/dd/o.htm   (416 words)

  
 Untitled   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-14)
In fact, one creature, the 2-foot-long Anomalocaris, was at first thought to be three different animals before it was determined the parts all went together to form one strange looking predator.
Opabinia had five eyes, which gave it excellent vision, but this was a design that nature didn't seem to use much thereafter.
An important little creature in the history of life on Earth, Pikaia is the first known living thing with a backbone.
www.jpinstitute.com /dinopedia/tl_lowerinfo_550mya.html   (418 words)

  
 opabinia from LiveJournal   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-14)
An addendum to my post a while back listing some strange animals: The opabinia regalis was a creature some 500 million years ago that was so strange-looking that the paleontologists who were shown the reconstructed image back in 1972 thought it was a joke.
She was talking about how the post WLS body takes in meat protein vs whey (shake-type) protein, and why we NEED some of the shake protein in order to not go into starvation mode...
(Opabinia is an ancient undersea creature from the famous Burgess Shale deposits in BC.
www.ljseek.com /search4/opabinia/1   (1090 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-14)
Thirty specimens of Opabinia are known and each ranges in size from 40- 70 mm.
The most intriguing feature of Opabinia are its five eyes found on the dorsal surface of the head.
Because of it's flexible body it is not known whether Opabinia was pelagic or benthic.
www.carleton.ca /Museum/burgessshale/misc4-5.html   (140 words)

  
 Opabinia: An unique body layout
Opabinia was not an arthropod —; it lacked the namesake trait of arthropods: jointed legs.
Opabinia evolved alongside arthropods, chordates, and echinoderms in the Cambrian —; but unlike these groups, Opabinia’s lineage went extinct by the end of the Cambrian.
Because it shares some traits with arthropods, researchers hypothesize that Opabinia might be closely related to the ancestral arthropod.
evolution.berkeley.edu /evolibrary/article/0_0_0/cambrian_08   (121 words)

  
 Wonderful Life Review
Whittington and his colleagues realised that most of their specimens were far less like modern animals than Walcott had alleged.
The five-eyed, nozzle-toting Opabinia cannot be assimilated to any textbook phylum.
But, since textbooks are written with modern animals in mind, this does not mean that Opabinia was, in fact, as different from its contemporaries as the status ‘phylum’ would suggest.
www.simonyi.ox.ac.uk /dawkins/WorldOfDawkins-archive/Dawkins/Work/Reviews/1990-02-25wonderful.shtml   (1064 words)

  
 Opabinia - Encyclopedia Glossary Meaning Explanation Opabinia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-14)
Here you will find more informations about Opabinia.
If you find this encyclopedia or its sister projects useful,
* Smithsonian page on Opabinia, with photo of Burgess Shale fossil
www.encyclopedia-glossary.com /en/Opabinia.html   (387 words)

  
 Burgess Shale Early Cambrian Explosion Wiwaxia Opabinia Pleurocystites Anomalocaris Laggania Hallucigenia Olenoides
More than 1/2 BILLION years old, the fossils of the Burgess Shale fauna preserve for us an intriguing glimpse of early animal life on Earth.
Opabinia with its five eyes is a strange looking one indeed.
Click on the Site A icon left for more diorama listed by location Click on the Site B icon to the right for Dioramas organized by period or by manufacturer.
www.dinosaurcollector.150m.com /PaleoSea2.html   (748 words)

  
 Wolfram Heldmaier   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-14)
Bergstr”m, J. Opabinia and Anomalocaris, unique Cambrian 'arthropods.' - Lethaia 19: 242-246.
Budd, G. The morphology of Opabinia regalis and the reconstruction of the arthropod stem-group.
The enigmatic animal Opabinia regalis, Middle Cambrian, Burgess Shale, British Columbia.
www.uni-wuerzburg.de /palaeontologie/Stuff/casu20.htm   (3129 words)

  
 New Page 1Wonderful Life Burgess Shale
The names of the fossils are also striking: Marella, Yohoia, Opabinia, Amiskwia, and Hallucigenia, are some of the names given to organisms discovered in the Burgess shale (Fig.
Opabinia, another remarkable animal, had five eyes and fed itself with a segmented, flexible, frontal appendage, much like a vacuum cleaner hose.
When Whittington first described this creature at a British scientific conference, his illustration of Opabinia was greeted with laughter, which he did not know how to interpret.
www.asa3.org /ASA/PSCF/1995/PSCF9-95Cook.html   (3095 words)

  
 Opabinia
Opabinia, another small Cambrian critter, grew to eight centimeters (about three inches).
This creature likely caught prey with the grasping claws of its long, tube-like proboscis and then stuffed the food into its mouth — much as an elephant uses its trunk.
Opabinia may have even used its proboscis to pull worms out of their burrows.
evolution.berkeley.edu /evolibrary/article/cambrian_06   (77 words)

  
 Kerygmachela kierkegaardi
The jaws vary from none to forms with both radiating teeth and teeth in rows.
Collins included within the group the Anomalocaridae (Anomalocaris and Laggania), Opabiniidae (Opabinia), Hurdia, Proboscicaris, Cassubia, and "three, possibly five, unnamed genera from China" within the Dinocarida, but was unconvinced of any close relationship between Anomalocaris and Kerygmachela.
Discussion: The combination of characters found in Kerygmachela allows it to be allied with the lobopods, represented in the extant fauna by the onychophorans, tardigrades, and possibly the pentastomids, and in the Cambrian fossil record by a morphologically diverse set of taxa, some of which are not assignable to the extant groupings.
www.peripatus.gen.nz /Taxa/Arthropoda/Kerygmachelakierkegaardi.html   (1035 words)

  
 Opabinia: An unique body layout
Opabinia had a clearly segmented body — but did it have jointed legs?
These stripes are the imprints of gill layers and were used for getting oxygen from the water.
In fact, Opabinia was not an arthropod —; it lacked the namesake trait of arthropods: jointed legs.
evolution.berkeley.edu /evolibrary/article/0_0_1/cambrian_08   (208 words)

  
 The Burgess Shale Creatures
Genus: Opabinia regalis (Unassigned to any major group)
Literally, King Opabin, after a mountain pass called Opabin (a local Indian word meaning cone-shaped), that lies between Mt. Hungabee and Mt. Biddle.
Click the following link to view a photo of a National Museum of Natural History specimen of Opabinia.
www.hrw.com /science/si-science/biology/animals/burgess/popabin.html   (208 words)

  
 Blogger: Email Post to a Friend   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-14)
In particular, I keep hearing tell of a critter called Opabinia, which swam along with its five eyes and a hose-like snout thing, doing heaven knows what to whom.
Being a fan of synchronicity (or at least being someone who can take a hint), today I spent a little time looking up the Burgess Shale, Opabinia, trilobites, and their ilk.
It's all absolutely fascinating stuff, and I recommend it as something to muddle over for a while; if you have some time, check it out.
www.blogger.com /email-post.g?blogID=9093353&postID=110333272527751164   (216 words)

  
 LRB | Richard Fortey : Shock Lobsters   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-14)
There was Opabinia, which carried on its head a veritable cluster of eyes, not to mention a huge anterior 'sucker'.
There was Anomalocaris, a swimming creature as large as a baby shark, equipped with two horrid grasping arms - jointed for all the world like those of a lobster - but with a body apparently as slick as a squid and weirdly flapped along its side.
So the Burgess animals were not new phyla, but fascinating glimpses into the early history of animals we know about - no less interesting, or odd, just more explicable.
www.lrb.co.uk /v20/n19/fort01_.html   (2231 words)

  
 Burgess Shale   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-14)
The site is one of only three in the world that hosts the oldest known fossils at about 515 million years.
Opabinia sports five eyes on stalks, with a single frontal claw presumably for transfering prey to its mouth.
Visit the Burgess Shale Web Site for more information on Opabinia and the naturalist-led 13-km roundtrip hike to the site.
www.footpath2nature.com /BurgessShale.htm   (87 words)

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