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Topic: Open Cluster M7


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In the News (Wed 17 Jul 19)

  
  Astronomy CD ROM I - Star Cluster Images   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The Open Cluster Westerlund 1 the Infrared (NGC 6618)
The Globular Cluster 47 Tucanae in the Infrared
The Globular Cluster Omega Centauri in the Infrared
astroa.physics.metu.edu.tr /Astronom/ISCL.HTM   (120 words)

  
 Ptolemy Cluster - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Ptolemy Cluster (also known as Messier Object 7 or NGC 6475) is an open cluster in the constellation Scorpius.
At the cluster's estimated distance of 800-1000 light years this corresponds to an actual diameter of 18-25 light years.
The age of the cluster is around 220 million years while the brightest star is of magnitude 5.6.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ptolemy_Cluster   (168 words)

  
 Scorpius Diagram and Additional Information   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
M4 is a globular cluster that is probably the easiest to locate with a telescope due to its proximity to Antares.
M7 are both open clusters that are also very easy to locate due to their proximity to Shaula.
M7 is easily visible with the naked eye on a clear night and they are both easy to fit in a low power field of view.
my.athenet.net /~vandkc/const/scorpinf.htm   (444 words)

  
 APOD: 2002 May 5 - The M7 Open Star Cluster in Scorpius   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Explanation: M7 is one of the most prominent open clusters of stars on the sky.
The cluster, dominated by bright blue stars, can be seen with the naked eye in a dark sky in the tail of the
Also visible is a dark dust cloud near the bottom of the frame, and literally millions of unrelated stars towards the Galactic center.
antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov /apod/ap020505.html   (141 words)

  
 M7   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The star cluster in the center of this photograph is known as M7 or NGC 6475.
This is a magnitude 3.3 open cluster that is visible to the naked eye near the tail of Scorpius.
M7 and M6 are two of the largest and brightest galactic star clusters.
members.cox.net /~k5xi/m7.htm   (245 words)

  
 Open Star Clusters
Over 1100 open clusters are known in our Milky Way Galaxy, and this is probably only a small percentage of the total population which is probably some factor higher; estimates of as many as about 100,000 Milky Way open clusters have been given.
As open clusters are often bright and easily observable with small telescopes, many of them have been discovered with the earliest telescopes: As seen in the list below, there are 27 in Messier's list, and 32 others were also known in summer 1782.
All the diffuse nebulae in Messier's catalog are associated with open clusters of young stars which have formed of the nebula's material in (astronomically) very recent times, and are still formed today in many cases.
www.obspm.fr /messier/open.html   (1102 words)

  
 Messier Object 7
This splendid cluster was known to Ptolemy, who mentioned it about 130 AD and described it as the "nebula following the sting of Scorpius." The description may also include M6, but this is uncertain.
M7 was observed by Hodierna before 1654, who counted 30 stars.
Ake Wallenquist found that this is one of the clusters with the highest degree of concentration toward the center.
www.seds.org /messier/m/m007.html   (331 words)

  
 Stargazer Online || Open Clusters M6 & M7   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
M6 and M7 are excellent objects to observe in an ordinary pair of binoculars and easy to see with the naked eye (especially from TSP).
M7 is the larger open cluster in the middle and M6 is above and to the right.
M7 is about 780 light-years distant and M6 is 1960 light-years from our Sun.
www.richardbell.net /Astrophotos/M6M7.html   (117 words)

  
 Open Clusters
Stars are sometimes concentrated into tight clusters with a diameter of about ten or twenty light years because the stars all formed in the same nebula.
These clusters usually disperse over millions of years although there are some that are more than one billion years old.
Column 4: Declination of the open cluster for epoch 2000.
www.atlasoftheuniverse.com /openclus.html   (312 words)

  
 [No title]
Clusters" "M79 is an example" "of a globular cluster.
Clusters" "M68 is an example" "of a globular cluster.
Clusters" "M3 is an example" "of a globular cluster.
www.meade.com /manuals/support/auto/AutostarTourFiles/DeepSky/StarGroupTour.mtf   (2554 words)

  
 Exercise 1.3: Distance to the Open Clusters   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Open clusters have been known since prehistoric times: The Pleiades (M45), the Hyades and the Beehive or Praesepe (M44) are the most prominent examples, but Ptolemy had also mentioned M7 and the Coma Star Cluster (Mel 111) as early as 138 AD.
As open clusters are often bright and easily observable with small telescopes, many of them were discovered with the earliest telescopes.
The nearest star cluster with a well populated main sequence, the Hyades Cluster in the constellation Taurus, is crucial to this technique.
www.astro.lsa.umich.edu /Course/MMSS/Interactive/Ex1.3   (1235 words)

  
 Stargazer Online || Star-Hopping in the Scorpion
Look for a small ball of light; this is the globular cluster M4, a collection of tens of thousands of stars 7000 light-years away.
Over a dozen blue and white stars are visible; several concentrated in the cluster's center with several more in the outer boundaries.
With M7 in the center of your field, slowly pan to the northwest and you'll come across M6, another open cluster.
www.richardbell.net /summer.html   (554 words)

  
 Exercize 3: Distances to Open Clusters   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
As open clusters are often bright and easily observable with small telescopes, many of them have been discovered with the earliest telescopes.
The method of obtaining the cluster distance is called main sequence fitting because it relies on "fitting" the main sequence on the cluster diagram to the standard main sequence.
We can find the distances to other star clusters by comparing the apparent brightnesses of their main sequence stars with those in the Hyades Cluster and assuming that all main sequence stars of the same temperature (or color) have the same luminosity.
www.astro.lsa.umich.edu /Course/MMSS/openclu.html   (1211 words)

  
 M6, M7, Open Clusters
M6, the Butterfly Cluster, at upper right, is a wonderful open cluster, it can be seen about 4 degrees northwest of M7, with both clusters being located in Scorpius.
M7, at bottom, consists of 80 stars brighter than magnitude 10 in a field of about 1.3 degrees apparent diameter.
Both clusters are visible with the unaided eye in a rich area of Milky Way located between Sagittarius and Scorpius.
www.astropix.com /HTML/D_SUM_S/M6_M7.HTM   (148 words)

  
 Florian's blog
However at 68x the open cluster is obviously made of stars while the galaxy remains a hazy glow.
Also in the area are open cluster M18, the Omega nebula M17, the Eagle nebula M16, and open cluster M23 to the west and M25 to the east.
Open clusters M26 and M11 in Scutum, globular M71 in Sagitta, the Dumbbell planetary M27 and the "Coathanger" asterism both in Vulpecula.
www.stargazing.com /blog2004.html   (20630 words)

  
 My Logbook   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
The cluster formed a triangle with two other stars in the area and was visible in the finder scope.
This cluster is almost on the same axis as M3, and I could easily find M3 and move back and forth to the area of NGC 5466 marking the stars between as I went.
The cluster appeared to be rose shaped with a dim arc of 5 stars near the stem.
user.mc.net /~klc/logbook.htm   (11176 words)

  
 Messier Object 7   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
M7 was observed by Hodierna before 1654 who counted 30 stars, and included in Lacaille's catalog of southern objects as Lac II.14.
M7 consists of 80 stars brighter mag 10 in a field of about 1.3 degrees apparent diameter which at its distance of perhaps 800 light years corresponds to a linear extension of 18 light years.
M7's age was estimated at 220 million years, both according to the Sky Catalog 2000 and the new calculation of the Geneva Group of G. Meynet.
www2.arnes.si /~gljsentvid10/messier/M007.HTM   (233 words)

  
 sciforums.com - M7 Open Star Cluster in Scorpius
M7 is one of the most prominent open clusters of stars on the sky.
The cluster, dominated by bright blue stars, can be seen with the naked eye in a dark sky in the tail of the constellation of Scorpius.
M7 contains about 100 stars in total, is about 200 million years old, spans 25 light-years across, and lies about 1000 light-years away.
www.sciforums.com /showthread.php?t=7329   (149 words)

  
 Sagittarius   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Sagittarius, "The Archer," is one of the richest constellations in the sky, filled with numerous nebulae and clusters.
Below and to the left of M24 is the open cluster M25.
In the right portion of the image are the large open cluster M7 and the smaller open cluster M6 in Scorpius.
webpages.charter.net /alsonwongweb/sagittar.htm   (257 words)

  
 M 7
This splendid cluster was known to Ptolemy who mentioned it about 130 AD, who described it as the "nebula following the sting of Scorpius".
M7 consists of about 80 stars brighter mag 10 in a field of about 1.3 degrees apparent diameter which at its distance of perhaps 800 light years corresponds to a linear extension of 18 or 20 light years.
Charles Messier observed May 23rd 1764 "A larger cluster of stars than the previous one." (M6).
www.messiermarathon.com /new_page_13.htm   (138 words)

  
 My M7 Picture Page
It's at the tail of Scorpius the scorpion.
There are some clusters just below this that Messier was unable to view from Paris; M7 was just a few degrees above the horizon there at its highest.
Dark Nebulae are visible: B287 just to the left of the middle cluster, B283 is to the right and down from the cluster, and perhaps B87 on the mid-upper-right part of the picture.
www.dl-digital.com /astrophoto/Messier-New/M7.htm   (395 words)

  
 Jeff Barbour; Pilgrim's Progress at Mt Hamilton
Open cluster M35 gave only a satisfactory view due to low sky postion and San Jose lightdome.
The cluster took on an almost "shield-like" shape to the cluster as a whole.
I was convinced the cluster lay due east of Delta in the Scorpion's Tail.
observers.org /reports/2002.05.09.2.html   (3145 words)

  
 Scorpius   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
Numerous star clusters and emission nebulae can be seen near the stars which form the "stinger" in the lower left portion of the image.
To the left of the end of the stinger (Lambda Scorpii) are the large open cluster M7 and the smaller open cluster M6.
Just to the right of M6 are the open cluster NGC 6383 and its associated faint red nebulosity.
webpages.charter.net /alsonwongweb/scorpius.htm   (223 words)

  
 Astronomy CD ROM I - The Open Cluster M7   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
M7 (NGC 6474) is an open star cluster in the constellation Scorpius, set against the dramatic backdrop of the Milky Way.
M7 was known as early as the year 130 AD (CE), when it was mentioned by Ptolemy.
At its (uncertain) distance is 800 to 1000 light years, M7's 80-odd stars are spread over some 20 light years and are in excess of 200 million years old.
astroa.physics.metu.edu.tr /Astronom/SC/M7.HTM   (127 words)

  
 Universe Today - What's Up This Week - March 27 - April 2, 2006   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
As we open our week long tour known as a "Messier Marathon," the late rise of the Moon tonight will be on the side of observers.
Binoculars are all that's needed to see the M34 open cluster also in Perseus, located roughly halfway between the "Demon Star" Algol and lovely double Almach, Gamma Andromeda.
The open cluster M41 in Canis Major is found just as quickly as drifting south of the brightest star in the sky.
www.universetoday.com /am/publish/whatsup_mar27_2006.html?2632006   (4924 words)

  
 [No title]
But elsewhere in the sky are clusters which have "grown up", blowing away their clouds of hydrogen gas.
The whole nebula and star cluster is almost 70 light years across, and the entire scene is about 8,000 light years away.
The cluster is to my mind the most beautiful of all the telescopic open clusters, and is called the "Wild Duck Cluster" due to its appearance of a cloud of ducks, rather evenly spaced, flying together across the sky.
www.monhegan.com /sky/july.html   (1864 words)

  
 CANOPUS 99/08 - Southern Sky Star Hopping   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-03)
To one side of the cluster centre are three distinctively spaced bright stars, which form a line in between the Scorpio sting and
The closest star of this trio to the centre of the open cluster has a fainter companion.
Delphinus is also home to two planetary nebulas, as well as two globular clusters – one of which is thought to be the most remote globular of our galaxy (comparable to the Magellanic clouds).
www.aqua.co.za /assa_jhb/Canopus/c998sssh.htm   (1694 words)

  
 Observations of objects of type "Open Cluster"
The star cluster at the core of the Rosette Nebula was easy, though the nebula itself was not detected.
Was not obviously a star cluster (as opposed to, say, a small, bright nebula) until I increased power.
As a result, the cluster displayed a faint glow on which many stars were embedded, making for a superb sight.
www.lies.com /aaol/view_obs.cgi?count=75&type=oc   (1170 words)

  
 Deep Space Photos by Thad V'Soske - Nebulas, Galaxies, Star Clusters, Milky Way, Andromeda
Open cluster M7 and surrounding star field in the constellation Scorpius.
Giant globular star cluster Omega Centauri in the constellation Centaurus.
The Omega nebula (M17/NGC6618), also known as the Swan nebula, in the constellation Sagittarius.
photosbythad.com /pgs/deep_space.htm   (147 words)

  
 Let There Be Starlight
Located about 2 degrees from the open cluster M7 in Scorpius, NGC6441 is relatively small cluster of magnitude 7.4.
The globular cluster M71 in Sagitta was very easy to find since it’s located almost exactly between the Delta and Gamma stars.
This 6.5 magnitude cluster is very highly resolved and quite a sight in the eyepiece.
www.mindspring.com /~jeffpo/starlite.htm   (1559 words)

  
 BinoSky: A guide to astronomy with binoculars.
47 Tucanae (NGC 104, a globular cluster in Tucana)
M6 (the Butterfly Cluster, an open cluster in Scorpius)
NGC104 (47 Tucanae, a globular cluster in Tucana)
www.lightandmatter.com /binosky/binosky.html   (804 words)

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