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Topic: Oriental Orthodox


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  Oriental Orthodox - OrthodoxWiki
The Oriental Orthodox churches rejected the dogmatic definitions of the Council of Chalcedon.
The Oriental Orthodox churches came to a parting of the ways with the remainder of Christianity in the 5th century.
The Assyrian Church of the East is sometimes considered an Oriental Orthodox Church, although it is not in communion with Oriental Orthodox churches and they have a Nestorian or Nestorian-like Christology that differs from the declaration of the Council of Chalcedon in an opposite way from the Miaphysites.
orthodoxwiki.org /Oriental_Orthodox   (539 words)

  
  Eastern Orthodox Church - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The designation "Orthodox", without reference to geographical terminology, is conventionally used by the various Churches to highlight what they see as their full adherence to doctrine; although geographical or ethnic designators such as "Eastern", "Greek" or "Russian" are in common use, the Orthodox Church sees itself as fully catholic (that is, universal).
Orthodox soteriology is therefore aimed at the bringing of man by grace to become what Christ is by nature, that is, being holy.
Oriental Orthodox are also sometimes referred to as "monophysites", "non-Chalcedonians", or "anti-Chalcedonians", although today the Oriental Orthodox Church denies that it is monophysite and prefers the term "miaphysite", to denote the "joined" nature of Jesus.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Eastern_Orthodoxy   (9757 words)

  
 Oriental Orthodoxy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Despite potentially confusing nomenclature, Oriental Orthodox churches are distinct from the churches that collectively refer to themselves as Eastern Orthodoxy.
The Oriental Orthodox churches are therefore often called Monophysite churches, although they reject this label, which is associated with Eutychian Monophysitism, preferring the term "non-Chalcedonian" or "Miaphysite" churches.
Oriental Orthodox Churches reject the Monophysite teachings of Eutyches, the teachings of Nestorius and the Dyophysite definitions of the Council of Chalcedon.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Oriental_Orthodoxy   (724 words)

  
 USCCB - (Office of Media Relations) - Guidelines Issued for Pastoral Care of Oriental Orthodox Students in Catholic ...
The Oriental Orthodox-Roman Catholic Theological Consultation is sponsored jointly by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops' Committee for Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs and the Standing Conference of Oriental Orthodox Churches in the United States.
The Oriental Orthodox Churches represented are the Armenian Apostolic Church, the Coptic Orthodox Church, the Syrian Orthodox Church of Antioch, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church, and the Malankara Syrian Orthodox Church.
The Co-Chairmen of the Consultation are Bishop Howard Hubbard of Albany and Chorbishop John Meno of the Syrian Orthodox Church.
www.usccb.org /comm/archives/1999/99-135.shtml   (370 words)

  
 Oriental Orthodox - Theopedia
The separation resulted in part from the Oriental Orthodox churches' refusal to accept the Christological dogmas of the Council of Chalcedon, which held that Jesus has two natures — one divine and one human, although these ware inseparable and only act as one hypostasis.
The Oriental Orthodox churches are therefore often called Monophysite churches, although they reject this label, which is associated with Eutychian Monophysitism, preferring the term "non-Chalcedonian" or "Miaphysite" churches.
Oriental Orthodox churches reject the Monophysite teachings of Eutychus and the Dyophysite teachings of Nestorius.
www.theopedia.com /Oriental_Orthodox   (552 words)

  
 's Storefront - Lulu.com
The Oriental Orthodox Library is an ever expanding series of volumes containing translations into English of theological works of importance to the faithful members and interested students of the Oriental Orthodox Churches.
This collection of selected letters of Severus, Patriarch of Antioch, between 512 and 518, and perhaps the greatest theologian of the Oriental Orthodox communion, are presented here to promote the mutual understanding of all Orthodox Christians and to further the efforts towards reconciliation between the Eastern and Oriental Orthodox Churches.
It is perhaps the most important study of Christology and the Council of Chalcedon to be published in the 20th century, and it is a privilege to be involved in its re-publication in the 21st century for a new generation of students and christians.
www.lulu.com /orthodoxlibrary   (2086 words)

  
 Religion Universe: ORIENTAL ORTHODOX CHURCHES
The six Oriental Orthodox churches — Coptic, Syrian, Armenian, Ethiopian, Eritrean and (Indian) Malankara — are also called ancient Oriental, lesser Eastern, and pre- or ante-Chalcedonian churches.
The Armenian national aspirations and the Armenian Orthodox faith are integrally interconnected.
The Orthodox church in India declared itself autocephalous in 1912, though conflicts with the Syrian patriarchate continue.
www.religion-religions.com /html/sub_sub_chapters.php?select2=orthodox000300&religion=Christianity&subof=christian0006   (966 words)

  
 Oriental Orthodoxy
The term Oriental Orthodoxy is currently used to describe those churches of the Eastern branch of Christianity that accept the first three ecumenical councils and reject all the later councils.  This term is often used, but is less than ideal, since "Eastern" and "Oriental" are in fact synonyms.
The Coptic Orthodox Church is one of the five so-called monophysite churches, characterised by their acceptance of the first three ecumenical councils and rejection of the Council of Chalcedon (451).
The Ethiopian Orthodox Church is one of the five so-called monophysite churches, characterised by their rejection of the Council of Chalcedon (451).
members.verizon.net /~vze48txr/OrientalOrthodoxy.htm   (3028 words)

  
 Oriental Orthodoxy Summary
Oriental Orthodox Churches include the Syrian Orthodox Church (also known as the Jacobite Church), the Armenian Gregorian Apostolic Orthodox Church, and, outside Asia, the Coptic (Egyptian) Orthodox Church, of which the Ethiopian Orthodox Church is a branch.
Despite potentially confusing nomenclature, Oriental Orthodox churches are distinct from the churches that collectively refer to themselves as Eastern Orthodoxy.
The separation resulted in part from the Oriental Orthodox churches' refusal to accept the Christological dogmas promulgated by the Council of Chalcedon, which held that Jesus has two natures — one divine and one human, although these were inseparable and only act as one hypostasis.
www.bookrags.com /Oriental_Orthodoxy   (1285 words)

  
 Indian Orthodox Herald English Edition Biweekly - Oriental Orthodox Churches Celebrated Eucharist Jointly In Atlanta On ...
The priests, deacons, and laity of the Armenian, Coptic, Ethiopian, Eritrean, Antiochene, and Indian Orthodox Churches came together at St. Mary's Coptic Orthodox Church on October 29, 2005, and celebrated the Eucharist jointly.
This is the first time that the Oriental Orthodox Churches in communion with each other are having a common event in the Southeastern Region.
The Oriental Orthodox Churches in Atlanta recently celebrated a common Oriental Orthodox liturgy in Atlanta on October 29 2005.
www.orthodoxherald.com /diocesenews5.asp   (378 words)

  
 [No title]
II- The Orthodox Church and the Eastern Orthodox Churches have a clear feeling that they live in, and confess Jesus Christ in the same faith, that is fed continuously and uninterruptedly from the fatherly apostolic source of the early centuries.
The Oriental Orthodox agree that the Orthodox are justified in their use of the two-natures formula, since they acknowledge that the distinction is ``in thought alone''.
In relation to the four later councils of the Orthodox Church, the Orthodox state that for them the above points 1-7 are the teachings also of the four later councils of the Orthodox Church, while the Oriental Orthodox consider this statement of the Orthodox as their interpretation.
www.coptic.net /articles/OrthodoxUnityDialog.txt   (12971 words)

  
 Oriental Orthodoxy
The term Oriental Orthodoxy is currently used to describe those churches of the Eastern branch of Christianity that accept the first three ecumenical councils and reject all the later councils.  This term is often used, but is less than ideal, since "Eastern" and "Oriental" are in fact synonyms.
The Coptic Orthodox Church is one of the five so-called monophysite churches, characterised by their acceptance of the first three ecumenical councils and rejection of the Council of Chalcedon (451).
The Ethiopian Orthodox Church is one of the five so-called monophysite churches, characterised by their rejection of the Council of Chalcedon (451).
home1.gte.net /~vze48txr/OrientalOrthodoxy.htm   (3028 words)

  
 Dialogue with the Oriental Orthodox
During and after the council of Chalcedon in 451, the Oriental Orthodox churches formed a family of churches since they did not accept the condemnation at this council of their St Dioscorus, the successor of St Cyril of Alexandria, and due to differences in expressing the mystery of incarnation of the Son of God.
Regarding the church, the Oriental Orthodox affirm that the church is built on the foundation of the apostles and prophets, and Jesus Christ is the chief cornerstone.
The Oriental Orthodox churches understand priesthood to be one of the seven sacraments of the church.
www.warc.ch /dt/erl1/21.html   (7179 words)

  
 ORTHODOX AND ORIENTAL ORTHODOX CONSULTATION
That this is so is due to the fact that there are strong indications that today's Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox have doctrinal positions which are not those of the Fathers of neither the first Three, nor of the Seven Ecumenical Councils.
The first time that he came close to a confession of the Orthodox faith was when he became a member of the committee, we have already mentioned, which found that Leo's Tome agrees with Cyril's Twelve Chapters.
On the other hand those of the Oriental Orthodox, who have not been Franco-Latinised in important parts of their theology, accept the first three of the Ecumenical Councils, but in reality accept all Seven, a fact which has now become clear in recent agreements.
www.romanity.org /htm/rom.06.en.orthodox_and_oriental_orthodox_consultation.htm   (5495 words)

  
 Middle Eastern Oriental Orthodox Common Declaration - May 9, 2000
We welcomed the pastoral agreement reached between the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria and the Greek Orthodox Patriarchate of Alexandria and all Africa regarding the mutual recognition of the sacraments of holy matrimony blessed in their respective churches in case of mixed marriages.
She underlined the positive impact of the Annual Meetings of the Heads of the Oriental Orthodox Churches in the Middle East on the ecumenical movement and particularly on the Orthodox Churches-WCC relationship and cooperation.
A Sub-Committee composed of the Deans of the Oriental Orthodox Theological Seminaries was appointed.
sor.cua.edu /Ecumenism/20000509oomtg3.html   (1442 words)

  
 Second Mtg. of the Jt. Commission of Oriental Orthodox Churches and the Russian Orthodox Church - September 4-6, 2001
After fifteen centuries of division, the later 20th century was marked with the beginning of an intensive and fruitful theological dialogue between the Orthodox and the Oriental Churches, in which the Russian Orthodox Church took part for many years as a member of the pan-Orthodox representation.
To implement this resolution, the Holy Synod of the Russian Orthodox Church in its session on March 30, 1999, resolved that the Russian Orthodox Church begin a direct bilateral dialogue with Oriental Churches.
Speaking about the significance of the bilateral dialogue of the Russian Orthodox Church with Oriental Orthodox Churches, His Holiness the Patriarch said that the beginning of bilateral talks did not call in question the significance of the pan-Orthodox dialogue which has been underway for the recent decades.
sor.cua.edu /Ecumenism/20010906OOROJtCMtg2.html   (692 words)

  
 Eastern Orthodoxy and "Oriental Orthodoxy"   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The adjective Oriental is synonymous with the adjective Eastern.
On the Orthodox side, the symposium included representatives from the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of North and South America, the Orthodox Church in America, and the Romanian Orthodox Church in America; on the Monophysite side, it included representatives from the Armenian Apostolic Church of America, the Coptic Orthodox Church, and the Syrian Orthodox Church of Antioch.
Deciphering this "ecumenically correct" jargon and restating it in plain Orthodox language, this symposium embraced the renunciation of Patristic Tradition, the scholarly prostitution of sacred theology, and the sacrifice of the next generation of Orthodox to appease the Moloch of Monophysitism.
www.orthodoxinfo.com /ecumenism/east_orth.aspx   (1007 words)

  
 Quodlibet Online Journal: The Orthodox Christology of St Severus of Antioch - by Peter Farrington   (Site not responding. Last check: )
This is a further explication of the Orthodox Christology of the Oriental Orthodox Churches.
Surely it is clear that it is the firm and decided teaching of the Oriental Orthodox Churches that the natures of humanity and divinity have a real, perfect, unconfused and continuing existence in union in the one hypostasis of the Word of God.
But the Fathers of the Oriental Orthodox Churches have never wandered from the faith of St Cyril or St Athanasius, and have always understood that if Christ were not fully God He would have no power to save us, and if He were not fully man then it would not be man who was saved.
www.quodlibet.net /farrington-severus.shtml   (7819 words)

  
 ORIENTAL ORTHODOX
Oriental Orthodox Dialogue Series Since 1990 the results of the dialogue rounds between theologians of the Oriental Orthodox Churches and the Roman Catholic Church have been published in an own...
The Official Theological Dialogue between the Oriental Orthodox Churches and the Catholic Church January 27-30, 2004, in Nasr City (Cairo, Egypt), at the Coptic Orthodox Saint Mark Centre...
Oriental Orthodox Churches The following article is the entry on Oriental Orthodox Churches from the Dictionary of the Ecumenical Movement published jointly by the World Council of Churches and the Wm...
www.spainimmo.nl /orientalorthodox   (333 words)

  
 Oriental Orthodox-Reformed dialogue
Five "Oriental Orthodox" churches today trace their descent from the "losing side" in the Chalcedonian dispute: the Syrian Orthodox Church of Antioch, the Coptic Orthodox Church, the Armenian Apostolic Church, the Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church in India and the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahido Church.
Representatives of the Oriental Orthodox churches and the Alliance met for a sixth round of dialogue from January 11 to 15 2000 at the Carberry Tower conference centre near Edinburgh.
The Oriental Orthodox hold that there are seven sacraments (although there are those who say that, theologically, no number can be set to the sacraments, which are infinite), while the Reformed hold that only the two dominical sacraments - baptism and the eucharist - are the sacraments of the church.
www.warc.ch /update/up101/01.html   (693 words)

  
 Frequently Asked Questions About the Oriental Orthodox Faith
The Oriental Orthodox Christians historically refer to the Orthodox Christians who did not accept the council of Chalcedon (4th Ecumenical council of the Byzantine Orthodox and Roman Catholics).
Today the Oriental Orthodox faith is distinguished by their rites: The Syriac Orthodox Church of Antioch & Malankara Syrian Orthodox (the Syriac Orthodox Church in India), the Armenian Apostolic Church, the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria, the Ethiopian Tawehedo Orthodox Church, and the Eritrean Orthodox Church.
In the Ethiopian Orthodox Church, the primary language used is Geez, with portions in Amharic and Coptic.
www.geocities.com /mfignatius/oo.html   (2173 words)

  
 Coptic Orthodox Diocese of the Southern United States - Q&A
The Coptic (Egyptian) Orthodox Church of Alexandria is one of the Oriental Orthodox Churches.
In September 1990 the two Orthodox denominations signed an agreement on Christology and recommendations were presented to the different Orthodox Churches to advance the restoration of communion between the two churches.
The Oriental Orthodox Church holds fast to the belief that the Lord Jesus Christ is One Prosopon and One Hypostasis in Oneness and not mere conjunction of natures; He is the True Incarnate Logos of God.
www.suscopts.org /q&a/index.php?qid=339&catid=277   (423 words)

  
 Oriental Orthodox Meeting
The 7th Meeting of the Heads of the Oriental Orthodox Churches in the Middle East was hosted by H. Pope Shenouda III at St. Mark Center in Nasr City, Cairo, Egypt from October 18 thru October 21, 2004.
The annual meeting was attended by H.H. Pope Shenouda III of Alexandria (Coptic Orthodox Church), H. Patriarch Mar Ignatius Zakka Iwas I of Antioch (Syrian Orthodox Church), and H. Catholicos Aram I of Cilicia (Armenian Orthodox of the Great House of Cilica, Lebanon).
Bishoy M. Mikhail, Ecumenical Officer of the Coptic Orthodox Church in North America, was invited by H. Pope Shenouda III, to participate in the sessions of the Standing Committee and the meeting of the Heads.
www.stmarkcoccleveland.org /orientalorthodoxmtg10-04.html   (399 words)

  
 Orthodox churches
The Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria is considered the spiritual leader of the Oriental Orthodox Churches.
It is to be noted that the spiritual leadership is not in the same sense understood for the one extended among the Eastern Orthodox Churches to the Church of Constantinople, it is however, in the spirit of respect and honour for the Apostolic Throne of Alexandria.
The "Malankara Orthodox Church is an ancient Church of India and it traces its origin to as far back as A. 52 when St. Thomas one of the disciples of Jesus Christ came to India and established Christianity in the South Western parts of the sub-continent.
www.ecumenism.net /denom/orthodox.htm   (1642 words)

  
 Orthodox Church Timeline - St. Mary of Egypt Orthodox Church   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The two major issues of division are Rome's claim to universal papal supremacy and her unilateral addition of the filioque clause to the Nicene Creed.
Orthodox hierarchs are replaced with those loyal to Rome.
Crown Prince Ras Tafari is coronated as Emperor of Ethiopia on November 2, vowing to defend the ancient Faith of the Orthodox Church.
www.stmaryofegypt.net /history.shtml   (1828 words)

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