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Topic: Oriental Orthodoxy


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In the News (Tue 19 Mar 19)

  
  Oriental Orthodoxy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The term Oriental Orthodoxy refers to the communion of Eastern Christian Churches that recognize only the first three ecumenical councils — the First Council of Nicaea, the First Council of Constantinople and the Council of Ephesus — and reject the dogmatic definitions of the Council of Chalcedon.
To the hierarchs who would lead the Oriental Orthodox, this was tantamount to accepting Nestorian flavored terminology, according their definition of Christology, which was founded in the Alexandrine School of Theology that advocated a formula that stressed unity of the Incarnation over all other considerations.
Oriental Orthodox Churches reject the heretical Monophysite teachings of Eutyches, the heretical teachings of Nestorius and the Dyophysite definition of the Council of Chalcedon.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Oriental_Orthodoxy   (847 words)

  
 Oriental Orthodoxy
The term Oriental Orthodoxy refers to several Eastern Christian traditions that diverged in the 5th century from the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church long before the East-West Schism of the 11th century in which that communion split into the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox churches.
The Oriental Orthodox churches are those that reject the dogmatic definitions of the Council of Chalcedon.
The Assyrian Church of the East is sometimes considered an Oriental Orthodox Church, although they left the Catholic and Apostolic Church in reaction against the Council of Ephesus 20 years earlier and revere Saints anathemized by the previously mentioned Churches.
www.wapipedia.org /wikipedia/mobiletopic.aspx?cur_title=Oriental_Orthodoxy   (346 words)

  
 Science Fair Projects - Oriental Orthodoxy
The Oriental Orthodox churches rejected the dogmatic definitions of the Council of Chalcedon.
Oriental Orthodox Churches reject the Monophysite teachings of Eutychus and the Dyophysite teachings of Nestorius.
The Assyrian Church of the East is sometimes considered an Oriental Orthodox Church, although they left the Catholic and Apostolic Church in reaction against the Council of Ephesus 20 years earlier and revere Saints anathematized by the previously mentioned Churches.
www.all-science-fair-projects.com /science_fair_projects_encyclopedia/Oriental_Orthodox_Churches   (739 words)

  
 Eastern Orthodox Church - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
On the basis of the numbers of adherents, Eastern Orthodoxy is the second largest Christian communion in the world after the Roman Catholic Church, and the third largest grouping overall after Protestantism.
Oriental Orthodox are also sometimes referred to as "monophysites", "non-Chalcedonians", or "anti-Chalcedonians", although today the Oriental Orthodox Church denies that it is monophysite and prefers the term "miaphysite", to denote the "joined" nature of Jesus.
In contrast, the term "Oriental Orthodoxy" refers to the churches of Eastern Christian traditions that keep the faith of only the first three ecumenical councils — the First Council of Nicaea, the First Council of Constantinople and the Council of Ephesus — and rejected the dogmatic definitions of the Council of Chalcedon.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Eastern_Orthodoxy   (10662 words)

  
 Oriental Orthodox - Theopedia
The term Oriental Orthodox refers to the churches of Eastern Orthodox traditions that keep the faith of only the first three ecumenical councils — the First Council of Nicaea, the First Council of Constantinople and the Council of Ephesus — and rejected the dogmatic definitions of the Council of Chalcedon.
The Oriental Orthodox churches resulted from a schism with the remainder of Christianity in the 5th century.
The separation resulted in part from the Oriental Orthodox churches' refusal to accept the Christological dogmas of the Council of Chalcedon, which held that Jesus has two natures — one divine and one human, although these ware inseparable and only act as one hypostasis.
www.theopedia.com /Oriental_Orthodox   (552 words)

  
 Oriental Orthodox - OrthodoxWiki
The separation resulted in part from the Oriental Orthodox churches' refusal to accept the Christological dogmas promulgated by the Council of Chalcedon, which held that Jesus Christ has two natures — one divine and one human, although these were inseparable and only act as one hypostasis.
The Oriental Orthodox Communion is a group of churches within Oriental Orthodoxy which are in full communion with each other [2].
The Assyrian Church of the East (Nestorian Church) is sometimes considered an Oriental Orthodox Church, although it is not in communion with Oriental Orthodox churches and they have a Nestorian or Nestorian-like Christology that differs from the declaration of the Council of Chalcedon in an opposite way from the Monophysites.
orthodoxwiki.org /Oriental_Orthodox   (516 words)

  
 Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Christianity
Christianity comprises a group of religious traditions originating with Jesus Christ that assert that Jesus is Lord, Saviour, God, the son of God and messiah--the sole savior of all humanity.
It consists of three main branches, Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, and the various religious denominations and sects of Protestantism.
The Western branch is divided principally into Catholicism and Protestantism, while the two main divisions of the Eastern branch are Eastern Orthodoxy and Oriental Orthodoxy.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/ch/Christianity   (3179 words)

  
 [No title]
Oriental Orthodoxy affirms that one's spiritual development, growth, maturation and fortification can only come about by a consistent exposure and unified 'experience' of God's grace.
persons of every age and gender, Oriental Orthodoxy adheres to the belief that everyone should immediately identify with the community and become truly part of the community in all things; from the waters of the font, by and through the Spirit, to the table of the Lord.
Both the water rite of Baptism and the anointing rite of Chrismation in the theology and tradition of the Oriental Orthodox Church are essential to one's salvation.
www.sain.org /window/Sacram2.txt   (3037 words)

  
 Eastern Orthodoxy - Christianity Knowledge Base - A Wikia wiki
Based on numbers of adherents, Eastern Orthodoxy is the second largest Christian communion in the world after the Roman Catholic Church, and the third largest grouping overall after Protestantism.
In Orthodoxy, the true believer accepts what is written in The Bible, and never doubts it, but the attitude of Eastern Orthodox toward various details varies, for example concerning the Theory of Evolution.
Orthodoxy interprets truth based on three witness; the consensus of the Holy Fathers and Mothers of the Church; the ongoing teaching of the Holy Spirit guiding the life of the Church through the nous, or mind of the Church, which is believed to be the Mind of Christ; but also in typography, hymnology and iconography.
christianity.wikia.com /wiki/Eastern_Orthodoxy   (9670 words)

  
 Armenian Orthodoxy
For his preaching, he was thrown into a deep dark pit in the middle of the barren countryside and left to waste away.
Armenian Orthodoxy, along with the Coptic, Syrian, Ethiopian and Indian Malabar Orthodoxies, is part of the Oriental Orthodoxy, or the non-Chalcedonian Orthodoxy.
Orientals place more credence in the belief that God is one, rather than three parts.
www.fordham.edu /halsall/medny/oster/index.html   (1103 words)

  
 Oriental Orthodox Dialogues
Representatives of the Oriental Orthodox Churches and the World Alliance of Reformed Churches met between 10-15th January 1999 at St. Ephrem Seminary as guests of His Holiness Mar Ignatius Zakka I Iwas, Patriarch of Antioch and all the East, Supreme Head of the Universal Syrian Orthodox Church.
The Oriental Orthodox Churches understand priesthood to be one of the seven sacraments of the Church.
The Oriental Orthodox Churches today are the Armenian Apostolic Church, the Coptic Orthodox Church, the Syrian Orthodox Church of Antioch, the Ethiopian Orthodox Church, the Eritrean Orthodox Church, and the Malankara Orthodox Syrian Church of India.
www.britishorthodox.org /e.shtml   (5579 words)

  
 Oriental Orthodoxy
The term Oriental Orthodoxy is currently used to describe those churches of the Eastern branch of Christianity that accept the first three ecumenical councils and reject all the later councils.  This term is often used, but is less than ideal, since "Eastern" and "Oriental" are in fact synonyms.
Oriental Orthodox church family, was established by St.
Even after such splits in the church, the Indian Orthodox Church remains the stronghold of Oriental orthodoxy in the sub continent.
members.verizon.net /~vze48txr/OrientalOrthodoxy.htm   (3028 words)

  
 Leo and Theodoret, Dioscorus and Eutyches
However, there are indications that something similar has crept into the Oriental Orthodox tradition also, if one may judge by WCC doctrinal documents like BEM and Confessing the One Faith and by papers produced in other dialogue contexts.
That this is so is due to the fact that there are strong indications that today's Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox have doctrinal positions which are not those of the Fathers of neither the first Three, nor of the Seven Ecumenical Councils.
On the other hand those of the Oriental Orthodox, who have not been Franco-Latinised in important parts of their theology, accept the first three of the Ecumenical Councils, but in reality accept all Seven, a fact which has now become clear in recent agreements.
www.orthodoxunity.org /article05.html   (5408 words)

  
 orthodoxy
The word orthodoxy, from the Greek ortho ('right', 'correct') and dox ('thought', 'teaching'), is typically used to refer to the correct observance of religion, as determined by some overseeing body.
People who deviate from orthodoxy by professing a doctrine considered to be false are called heretics, while those who deviate from orthodoxy by removing themselves from the perceived body of believers, i.e.
Apostasy is a violation of orthodoxy that takes the form of abandonment of the faith, be it for some form of atheism or for some other faith.
www.findthelinks.com /Religion/orthodoxy.htm   (770 words)

  
 Eastern Orthodoxy and "Oriental Orthodoxy"
The adjective Oriental is synonymous with the adjective Eastern.
The Fourth Ecumenical Synod anathematized Monophysitism, the Fifth Ecumenical Synod confirmed this decision, the Sixth Ecumenical Synod condemned Monotheletism and Monoenergism, and the Seventh Ecumenical Synod reaffirmed all of the foregoing.
Relying on the results achieved by past conferences and commissions which have examined the "Orthodoxy" of the Monophysites, the participants glibly concluded "that there exists full agreement on the substance of the faith of the two churches, notwithstanding the differences in terms" (p.
www.orthodoxinfo.com /ecumenism/east_orth.aspx   (1007 words)

  
 Oriental Orthodoxy - Wikichristian
The Oriental Orthodox Communion refers to the churches of Eastern Christian traditions that keep the faith of only the first three ecumenical councils and reject the the Council of Chalcedon.
The separation resulted in part from the Oriental Orthodox churches' refusal to accept the view that Jesus has two natures — one divine and one human.
The Oriental Churches include the Armenian Apostolic Church, Coptic Orthodox Church and the Syriac Orthodox Church.
www.wikichristian.org /index.php?title=Eastern_Oriental_churches   (154 words)

  
 Orthodox
This emphasis on the use of the original "creed" is shared today by all "eastern orthodox" churches.
Similar to this emphasis on traditional ways, the Russian Orthodox church is also known to promote the idea that the last Russian Czar and his family are "saints of true orthodoxy" and have preserved their faith to many people through their good works and belief in "orthodox christianity".
In English, the term Oriental Orthodoxy is sometimes used to refer to non-Chalcedonian eastern Christians, i.e.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/or/Orthodox.html   (228 words)

  
 Flesh of Our Brethren by Abba Seraphim (Book) in Religion & Spirituality   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-15)
If the Orthodox Churches have almost universally ignored the West as a field in which the seeds of the Orthodox faith might be sown, keeping it as territory for the religious and cultural ghettoes, historians considering attempts at Orthodox evangelism for the West have sought to treat their subjects with little more than contempt.
Attempts at establishing an Orthodoxy for the West can therefore be ridiculed as, at best, curiosities doomed to fail, or, at worst, fraudulent schemes promoted by the deluded or the deluding.
He has written a study of attempts to establish an Oriental Orthodoxy outside its traditional territories and cultures which derive from the Syrian Orthodox Patriarchate of Antioch, basing it not only on some forty years of research, but also on previously unknown and unpublished primary sources.
www.lulu.com /content/215239   (889 words)

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