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Topic: Orkhon script


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In the News (Mon 1 Sep 14)

  
  Orkhon script - Definition, explanation
The oldest examples of this alphabet are stone inscriptions such as the Orkhon inscriptions from the Orhon River valley in the Orhon province of Mongolia.
The Orkhon script goes by several names: the Kokturk, Kok Turki, Gokturk, Gök-Turk, and Kök-Turk Alphabet, and, because of its superficial "runiform appearance, it is sometimes called Orkhon runes or Turkic runes.
The Orkhon script may have evolved from a non-cursive form of the Sogdian alphabet.
www.calsky.com /lexikon/en/txt/o/or/orkhon_script.php   (253 words)

  
  Orkhon script - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
The script was discovered in an 1889 expedition to the Orkhon Valley monuments in Mongolia, which date from the early 8th century.
The Orkhon script is sometimes described as runiform because its external similarity to the runic alphabet.
The Orkhon monuments are the oldest known examples of Turkish writings; they are inscribed on obelisks and have been dated to 720 (for the obelisk relating to Tonyukuk), to 732 (for that relating to Kültigin), and to 735 (for that relating to Bilge Kagan).
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Orkhon_script   (424 words)

  
 Orkhon script - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The oldest examples of this alphabet are stone inscriptions such as the Orkhon inscriptions from the Orhon River valley in the Orhon province of Mongolia.
The Orkhon script goes by several names: the Kokturk, Kok Turki, Gokturk, Gök-Turk, and Kök-Turk Alphabet, and, because of its superficial "runiform" appearance, it is sometimes called Orkhon runes or Turkic runes.
The Orkhon script may have evolved from a non-cursive form of the Sogdian alphabet.
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/Gokturk_runes   (218 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: History of the alphabet
The Iberian scripts (or Iberian alphabet) are two scripts (or two styles of the same script) found on the Iberian peninsula, the Northeast and South Iberian script.
The Aramaic alphabet, which evolved from the Phoenician in the 7th century BC as the official script of the Persian Empire, appears to be the ancestor of nearly all the modern alphabets of Asia: The Aramaic alphabet is an abjad alphabet designed for writing the Aramaic language.
The Osmanya alphabet is a script for the Somali language invented between 1920 and 1922 by the Sultan of Obbias brother, Cismaan Yuusuf Keenadiid.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/History-of-the-alphabet   (7088 words)

  
 Omniglot index by writing direction
Chinese, Chữ-nôm, Japanese, Korean, Meroïtic (Hieroglyphic script), Nushu, Tangut (Hsihsia)
The Ancient Egytian Hieroglyphic script was written in any direction the was convenient: horizontally from right to left or left to right or vertically from top to bottom.
Orkhon was written mainly from right to left in horizontal lines, though some inscriptions are written vertically with the letters rotated by 90º.
www.omniglot.com /writing/direction.htm   (678 words)

  
 The Uighurs / Script
Orkhon inscriptions are found on the gravestones, stele and obelisks, which describe the most important moments of life of the buried person.
Uighur script was created on the basis of Sogdian cursive (italic) alphabet not later than the beginning of the 1st millennium.
Script, which was used more than 700-800 years not only by the Uighurs, but also by other Turkic and non-Turkic peoples, as well as huge cultural and political influence of the Uighurs in Central Asia fell into decay with arrival of Islam into the region.
the_uighurs.tripod.com /Scrpt.htm   (2015 words)

  
 Orkhon script . Enpsychlopedia
The script was discovered in an 1889 expedition to the Orkhon Valley monuments in Mongolia, which date from the early 8th century.
The Orkhon script is sometimes described as runiform because its external similarity to the runic alphabet.
The Orkhon monuments are the oldest known examples of Turkish writings; they are inscribed on obelisks and have been dated to 720 (for the obelisk relating to Tonyukuk), to 732 (for that relating to Kültigin), and to 735 (for that relating to Bilge Kagan).
enpsychlopedia.org /psypsych/Orkhon_script   (426 words)

  
 NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Kazakh language
Related predecessors to Kazakh were written in the Orkhon script, containing 24 letters.
The Kazak Cyrillic script is based on the Russian alphabet with 9 additional letters: Ó˜, Ò’, Òš, Ò¢, Ó¨, Ò°, Ò®, Òº, Ä°.
Orkhon script The Orkhon script is the earliest known Turkic alphabet.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Kazakh-language   (3063 words)

  
 Orkhon inscriptions   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The script was discovered in a 1889 expedition to the Orkhon Valley monuments in Mongolia, which date from the early 8th century.
It is thought that the script was inspired by non-cursive Sogdian.
The inscription corpus consists of two monuments which were erected in the Orkhon Valley between 732 and 735 in honour of two Kokturk princes named Kul and Bilge, as well as inscriptions on slabs scattered in the wider area.
www.abcworld.net /Orkhon_inscriptions.html   (233 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Orkhon script (also spelled Orhon script, Turkish: Orhon Yazıtları) is the earliest known Turkic alphabet.
The inscription corpus consists of two monuments which were erected in the Orkhon Valley between 732 and 735 in honour of the two Kokturk prince Kul Tigin and his brother the emperor Bilge Khan, as well as inscriptions on slabs scattered in the wider area.
The Orkhon monuments are the oldest known examples of Turkic writings; they are inscribed on obelisks and have been dated to 720 (for the obelisk relating to Tonyukuk), to 732 (for that relating to Kültigin), and to 735 (for that relating to Bilge Kagan).
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Orkhon_inscriptions   (424 words)

  
 Mongol Scripts
This script was intended to be a universal script for all languages spoken in the Mongol Empire including Mongol, Arabic, Tibetan, Chinese, Sanskrit and Turkic.
This alphabetic script was developed in 1905 by a Buryat monk named Agwan-Dorji (1850-1938) as a variation of Uighur Script with less ambiguity.
The former is a logographic script based on Chinese characters, and the latter, developed by a Khitan scholar named Diela, is a syllabic script influenced in part by Uighur with characters for each syllable combined into word groups.
www.viahistoria.com /SilverHorde/research/MongolScripts.html   (2659 words)

  
 Definition of index.php?search=script&limit=20&offset=20
According to Lowe the perfected form of the script was used in the [[11th century]], while [[Pope Vi...
The Orkhon script may have evolved from a non-cursive form of the [...
Although it is systematic and accurate, the script is verbose and unable to write [[shorthand]].
www.wordiq.com /knowledge/index.php?search=script&limit=20&offset=20   (757 words)

  
 Orkhon script   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Orkhon script The Orkhon Script is an alphabet developed by the Gokturks, a Turkic tribespeople, to write the Uighur language from about 715 AD to about 800 AD, when it was replaced by the Uighur Alphabet.
It is the earliest known alphabet developed by Turkic peoples living in Central Asia.
The Orkhon Script goes by many names: the Orkhon (''Kokturk'', Kok Turki, Gokturk, Gök-Turk or Kök-Turk) Alphabet, and because of its superficial resemblance to the Runic alphabets of the Germanic-speaking peoples of Europe, it is sometimes called Orkhon runes or Turkic runes, or is described as runiform to gesture at the similarity.
orkhon-script.iqnaut.net   (227 words)

  
 Orkhon script . 715 . Sogdian alphabet   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The Orkhon Script is an alphabet developed by the Gokturks Gokturks, a Turkic tribespeople, to write the Uighur language from about 715 AD to about 800 AD, when it was replaced by the Uighur Alphabet.
Orkhon inscriptions Inscriptions written in this alphabet have been found in the Orhon River valley in the Orhon aymag Orhon province of Mongolia.
The Orkhon Script goes by many names: the Orkhon Kokturk, Kok Turki, Gokturk, Gök-Turk or Kök-Turk Alphabet, and because of its superficial resemblance to the Runes Runic alphabets of the Germanic languages
www.uk.fraquisanto.net /Orkhon_script   (327 words)

  
 Orkhon alphabet
They date from the early 8th century AD and the script in which they are written is known as the Orkhon alphabet.
The Orkhon alphabet is thought to have been derived from or inspired by a non-cursive version of the Sogdian script.
By the 9th century AD, the Orkhon and Yenisei alphabets were replaced by the Uighur alphabet, which developed from the cursive version of the Sogdian script.
www.omniglot.com /writing/orkhon.htm   (249 words)

  
 Turkic language   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Unlike other earlier nomads who left no records of written language, the Turks possessed the so-called Orkhon inscriptions (a Kok Turk invention related to Eastern Khate around AD 682) in a runic-like script, and this script was deciphered back in 1896.
When you look at the photos of ruins of Karakorum, near the Orkhon River, southwest of Ulaanbaatar as well as few slates of tomb stones on the desolate Gobi, the impression will be all yours to imagine who the successive dwellers had been on that land.
There is on record a poem written by the wife of a Chinese officer under the Di[1] people's Anterior Qin Dynasty (AD 351-394), and it was said that this love poem was sent to her husband who was exiled to the border post in China's silk road.
www.findthelinks.com /history/Huns_Turks/Turkic_language.htm   (1112 words)

  
 Runic alphabet - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: )
However, the use of runes persisted for specialized purposes in Scandinavia, longest in rural Sweden until the early 20th century (used mainly for decoration as runes in Dalarna and on Runic calendars).
The development here might seem rather astonishing, since the younger form of the alphabet came to use fewer different rune-signs at the same time as the development of the language led to a greater number of different phonemes than had been present at the time of the older futhark.
Another fringe theory is that the runes originated directly from the Middle East, and are related to the Nabataean alphabet, a variant of the Phoenician alphabet.
work-pro.net /cgi-bin/cgiproxy/nph-proxy.pl/000110A/687474702s656r2r77696o6970656469612r6s72672s77696o692s52756r65   (2426 words)

  
 ORKHON SCRIPT Articles The Orkhon script (also spelled Orh
The Orkhon script (also spelled Orhon script, also Orkhon-Yenisey script, Old Turkic script, Göktürk script, Turkish Orhun Yazitlari) is the alphabet used by the Göktürk from the 8th century to record the Old Turkic language.
The script is named after the Orkhon Valley in Mongolia, where 8th century inscriptions were discovered in an 1889 expedition by Nikolay Yadrintsev.
Mainstream opinion derives the Orkhon script from variants of the Aramaic alphabet, in particular via the Pahlavi and Sogdian alphabets, as suggested by V.Thomsen, or possibly via Karosthi (c.f.
www.amazines.com /Orkhon_script_related.html   (491 words)

  
 Orkhon script - China-related Topics OQ-OT - China-Related Topics
The Orkhon Script is an alphabet developed by the GokturksGokturks, a Turkic tribespeople, to write the Uighur language from about 715 AD to about 800 AD, when it was replaced by the Uighur Alphabet.
Orkhon inscriptionsInscriptions written in this alphabet have been found in the Orhon River valley in the Orhon aymagOrhon province of Mongolia.
The Orkhon Script goes by many names: the Orkhon (Kokturk, Kok Turki, Gokturk, G?k-Turk or K?k-Turk) Alphabet, and because of its superficial resemblance to the RunesRunic alphabets of the Germanic languagesGermanic-speaking peoples of Europe, it is sometimes called Orkhon runes or Turkic runes, or is described as runiform to gesture at the similarity.
www.famouschinese.com /virtual/Orkhon_script   (296 words)

  
 Australian Information from Wikipedia
After the event, a message was sent to the north to appease the restlessly Tiele, and the situation became stabilize, in 669, analogous unsuccessful revolt had also been made by the remainings Xueyantuo around upper Orkhon, however the details of occurrence are vague.
The last mention of revolt was made in 686, leading by the Pugu and Tongluo to correspond with the Ashina, who had succeed to form the Second Turkic Eastern Qaghanate under Ilteris Sad in 682.
The Chinese records show fragmentary happenings to the north at this point of time, according to the Tonyukuk and Kültigin Orkhon script, the Turk made five out of forty-seven attacks on the Oguz (Tiele) led by Ilteris.
www.thinkingaustralia.com /thinking_australia/wikipedia/default.php?title=Dingling   (6004 words)

  
 Soviet Language Policy in Central Asia
These early Turks have left behind inscriptions in the runic Orkhon script (based on the Aramaic alphabet used by Nestorian Christians in the area at that time), giving evidence that there was some form of literary culture amongst these semi-barbaric nomads even at this early time.
The adoption of the Russian script by most of the languages has not only contributed to their development, but has been of notable assistance to the various nationalities of the Soviet Union in their successful mastery of the Russian language and in the assimilation of Russian culture (cited in Rywkin 1963:86).
The Arabic script was modified in 1947 (in much the same way that it was initially modified in the USSR in the early 1920's) and a Latinized alphabet similar to the official Pinyin system was devised in 1965.
www.oxuscom.com /lang-policy.htm   (9502 words)

  
 Orkhon script
Abacci > Abaccipedia > Or > Orkhon script
The earliest known alphabet is the Kokturk (Kok Turki, Gokturk) alphabet developed by Kokturks, a Turkic tribespeople that had established a broad Central Asian empire and reached its zenith between the 6th and the 8th century AD.
The first samples of this alphabet can be found on stone inscriptions (the best known are the Orkhon inscriptions) and dated to the early 8th century AD.
www.abacci.com /wikipedia/topic.aspx?cur_title=Orkhon_script   (272 words)

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