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Topic: Oxford, England


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  Oxford - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census).
Oxford is twinned with Bonn in Germany, Grenoble in France, León in Nicaragua, Leiden in the Netherlands, and Perm in Russia.
Oxford's Town Hall was built by Henry T. Hare, the foundation stone was laid on 6 July 1893 and opened by the future King Edward VII on 12 May 1897.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Oxford,_England   (1444 words)

  
 University of Oxford - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Oxford is a member of the Russell Group of research-led British universities, the Coimbra Group (a network of leading European universities), the LERU (League of European Research Universities), and is also a core member of the Europaeum.
Oxford is a collegiate university, consisting of the University's central facilities, such as departments and faculties, libraries and science facilities, and 39 colleges and 7 Permanent Private Halls (PPHs).
Oxford has had a role in educating four British and at least eight foreign kings, 47 Nobel prize-winners, three Fields medallists, 25 British Prime Ministers, 28 foreign presidents and prime ministers, seven saints, 86 archbishops, 18 cardinals, and one pope.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/University_of_Oxford   (2739 words)

  
 EH.Net Encyclopedia: Economy of England at the Time of the Norman Conquest
England was divided into shires, or counties, which were subdivided into hundreds.
Although the Survey records 112 boroughs, agriculture was the predominant economic activity, with stock rearing of greater importance in the south-west and arable farming more important in the east and midlands.
Darby, H.C. The Domesday Geography of Eastern England.
www.eh.net /encyclopedia/?article=mcdonald.domesday   (2722 words)

  
 Oxford - tourist information guide to holiday accommodation, activities, attractions, historic sites.
Oxford's famous museums include the Ashmolean Museum, the Pitt Rivers Museum, the Museum of the History of Science, the Bate Collection of Historical Instruments and the Museum of Oxford.
Oxford is a lively cultural centre and offers a wide variety of performing arts featuring distinguished artists.
Oxford straddles two rivers and is served by the Oxford canal.
www.touristnetuk.com /wm/oxford   (847 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Oxford, city, England (British And Irish Political Geography) - Encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
By the 12th cent., Oxford was the site of a castle, an abbey, and the university.
During the 13th cent., frequent conflicts arose between the town and the university in which the university, with the support of the church and the king, was usually victorious.
During the civil wars, Oxford was the royalist headquarters; it was besieged but not damaged by the parliamentarians.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/O/OxfordEng.html   (351 words)

  
 Oxford Hotels, Guest Houses and Self Catering Accommodation
Oxford Spires Four Pillars Hotel is a four star deluxe hotel set amongst 40 acres of parkland with river access...
The Randolph is one of Oxfords leading museums and is situated in the heart of the city opposite the Ashmolean...
These Oxford hotels, guest houses and self catering accommodation are not part of the any online hotel reservations systems and thus all enquiries should go directly to the hotel / guest house / self catering accommodation.
www.oxford-hotel.co.uk   (771 words)

  
 Breeds of Livestock - Oxford Sheep
During the period from 1829 to 1850 the type of Oxfords was quite variable, and during early periods in their development they were sometimes referred to as the Down-Cotswold sheep because of their crossbreed nature.
Although the Oxford does not shear quite as many pounds of wool in proportion to its live weight as does the Shropshire, it does shear a valuable commercial fleece of long-staple, light-shrinking wool.
Oxford ewes are prolific, and lambing percentages of 150 percent are not uncommon.
www.ansi.okstate.edu /breeds/sheep/oxford   (637 words)

  
 Oxford Kansas   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
Founded in 1871, Oxford’s first citizens had high hopes and a vision, naming the town after Oxford, England, in hopes that it would be a center of learning.
In the 1930’s, Oxford was an oil boom town with a booming population and business district—there was even an opera house.
Oxford’s history really began in 1869, when the Osage Indians camped near the large cottonwood ford which winds along the Ninnescah River and dumps into the Arkansas River.
www.oxfordks.org   (251 words)

  
 GPP - Biomedical Sciences - University of Oxford (England)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
The National Institutes of Health-University of Oxford Scholars in Biomedical Sciences interdisciplinary program is specially devoted to the training of outstanding students in various areas of biomedical research leading to a Doctor of Philosophy degree awarded by the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom.
It is envisioned that students will spend roughly half of their time at Oxford and half their time at NIH, though the specific division of time will be dictated by the nature of the research.
The University of Oxford is one of the world's most prestigious universities and the training institution of Rhodes Scholars.
gpp.nih.gov /Applicants/ProspectiveStudents/Oxford   (462 words)

  
 England Travel Information | Lonely Planet Destination Guide
Until recently England was generally thought of as a gentle, fabled land freeze-framed sometime in the 1930s, home of the post office, country pub and vicarage.
From Stonehenge and Tower Bridge to Eton and Oxford, England is loaded with cherished icons of a past era.
King of England is an awful job: Harold I copped an arrow through the eye, Edward II was killed by his wife and Edward V murdered by his uncle.
www.lonelyplanet.com /worldguide/destinations/europe/england   (351 words)

  
 University of Oxford - Department of Earth Sciences   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
The Earth Sciences are the focus of scientific understanding about this and other planets, embracing an enormous range of topics, including the evolution of life, the nature of planetary interiors, the causes of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, earth-surface processes and the origin and behaviour of oceans and atmosphere.
Both theory and basic observation are recognized as essential elements in the Earth Sciences, and students with a strong background in all aspects of the physical sciences are encouraged to join the Department.
Oxford is one of the leading centres of geological research in the UK, rated 5* in the higher education funding council of England (HEFCE) research assessment exercise.
www.earth.ox.ac.uk   (134 words)

  
 Oxford Information - The Scholar's Guide to Oxford, UK. Tourist information for visitors to the University city of ...
Oxford University is the oldest English speaking university in the world and is able to trace its origins back over at least nine centuries.
Oxford became an established seat of learning as early as the 11th century, but the University as we know is today did not start to take shape until the 12th century.
We survey the history of some of Oxford's most important colleges, looking at their history, traditions and their famous former members.
www.oxford-info.com /University.htm   (321 words)

  
 Oxford Hotels. Hotels in Oxford - Accommodation UK   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
Oxford's leading hotel, this large, neo-Gothic hotel lies in Oxford's historic heart directly opposite the famous Ashmolean Museum and within easy walking distance of the Colleges.
Oxford Spires Four Pillars Hotel is a four star deluxe hotel set amongst 40 acres of parkland with river access and only a short walk from Oxford city.
Oxford's beauty is founded on its colleges with their cloisters and quadrangles, set against the backdrop of Christchurch Meadow.
www.picturesofengland.com /hotels/Oxford_hotels   (966 words)

  
 City of Oxford Official Website
Oxford was first incorporated as a town in 1837, and was given its name after the town of Oxford, England in the hopes of securing Mississippi's first university.
Oxford's growth in the next century made it an attractive place to settle.
Oxford has been ranked many times as an ideal retirement destination because of its reasonable cost of living, high-quality medical care, assortment of restaurants and other amenities important to retirees.
www.oxfordms.net   (386 words)

  
 Oxford maps
Map of tourist attractions in Oxford from the Oxford City Council.
Monochrome map of central Oxford from the Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics.
Oxford, by John Speed, 1605, central Oxford in Oxonia Antiqua illustrated by Ralph Agas, 1578 and Ordnance Survey Oxford District map cover, 1921 from the Bodleian Library.
web.comlab.ox.ac.uk /oxinfo/maps   (396 words)

  
 Oxford Playhouse: Show Listings
Orestes is Euripides’ savage twist on the legendary fall of an ancient dynasty.
Oxford Playhouse is a vibrant presenting theatre and a key date on the national touring circuit, with strong support from a wide cross-section of audience.
Situated In the heart of Oxford, opposite the Ashmolean Museum, we are committed to making your trip as enjoyable as possible.
www.oxfordplayhouse.com   (545 words)

  
 Oxford Symposium on Food & Cookery
The Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery is an educational charity.
Its prime objective is to foster and encourage exploration of food history as a serious topic of research, and the purpose of its charitable status is to allow it to raise funds to sponsor endeavours in this field.
This event - the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery - brings together writers, historians, sociologists, anthropologists, scientists, chefs and others who specialise in the study of food in history, its place in contemporary societies, and related scientific developments.
www.oxfordsymposium.org.uk   (159 words)

  
 Oxford, England Photographers - Wedding, Portrait, Commercial, Event and Other Photography Services
This Oxford, England photographer featured listing has received 267 unique visitors in the past three months.
Click here to learn more about why a Marketingtool.com Oxford photography service featured listing is one of the best methods of advertising your business.
This photographer services: Oxford, England from a local, regional or national office.
www.marketingtool.com /channel/photo/b.465.g.13596.html   (616 words)

  
 OUCLF: articles: Montesquieu | I Stewart (ed/tr) (2002)
His declared model is England, already a constitutional monarchy, which he and many of his Continental contemporaries admired as a land of liberty compared with the nonconstitutional monarchies under which most of them lived.
If a man in England were to have as many enemies as he has hairs on his head, nothing would happen to him: and that means a lot, for the health of the soul is as necessary as that of the body.
Sir Thomas More (1477-1535) was Chancellor of England (1529-1532) and author of the humanist classic Utopia (1516); he was beheaded for refusing to recognise Henry VIII as head of the newly formed Church of England and canonised in 1935, the patron saint of lawyers.
ouclf.iuscomp.org /articles/montesquieu.shtml   (17642 words)

  
 VRMAG - UP, DOWN AND ALL ROUND OXFORD, ENGLAND   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
Karl Harrison of Oxford University, along with the students in his senior chemistry class, has produced a mind-bogglingly mammoth tour of Oxford, England.
Keble College is named after John Keble, one of the leaders of the Oxford Movement, a group critical of the increasing secularization of the Church of England.
J.R. Tolkiens’ Oxford covers areas of special relevance to the author and scholar, who spent over fifty years of his adult life in the city.
vrm.vrway.com /issue13/UP_DOWN_AND_ALL_ROUND_OXFORD_ENGLAND.html   (944 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Books: The Oxford Illustrated History of Medieval England (Oxford Illustrated Histories)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
England Under the Norman and Angevin Kings, 1075-1225 (New Oxford History of England) by Robert Bartlett
From the departure of the Roman legions, to the battle of Bosworth and the rise of the Tudors, the world of medieval England was one of profound diversity and change.
A comprehensive introduction to medieval England surveying the years from the departure of the Roman legions to the Battle of Bosworth.
www.amazon.com /exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0198205023?v=glance   (965 words)

  
 Accelrys: History - Oxford Molecular   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
Oxford Molecular was a leading provider of cheminformatics tools.
Oxford Molecular's primary expertise was in the area of cheminformatics, and in the consulting services associated with building enterprise informatics systems.
The Oxford Molecular software businesses were acquired by Pharmacopeia Inc. in September 2000, and combined with Pharmacopiea's other software subsidiaries in June 2001 to form Accelrys.
www.oxmol.co.uk   (140 words)

  
 Welcome to Oxford City
Oxford, The City of Dreaming Spires, is famous the world over for its University and place in history.
For over 800 years, it has been a home to royalty and scholars, and since the 9th century an established town, although people are known to have lived in the area for thousands of years.
But, if you find you do want more, then Oxford is a just a short hop away from many other attractions and the capital city itself, London.
www.oxfordcity.co.uk   (255 words)

  
 News - The Oxford Student - Official Student Newspaper
Oxford’s unique status as the last British university to educate child prodigies may soon be a thing of the past...
A former Oxford University employee has been arrested and charged after a spate of high-profile thefts at Oxford colleges over the summer.
Oxford MPs are calling for the protection of some of Oxford’s most famous buildings as a fifty-year-old treaty is finally ratified by the UK.
www.oxfordstudent.com   (475 words)

  
 Oxford Haemophilia Centre Home Page   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-08-19)
The Oxford Haemophilia Centre is on the site of the Churchill Hospital, two miles east of the city centre in the suburb of Headington.
The Friends of Oxford Haemophilia Centre is a registered charity (no. 1049436), formed in 1992 with the aims of raising money to support the work of the Centre through fund raising, attracting donations and legacies and social events.
The Oxford Haemophilia Centre was designated an International Haemophilia Training Centre by the World Federation of Haemophilia in 1974, and is now twinned with the haemophilia centre in Zagreb (Croatia) although we receive visitors from many other countries.
www.medicine.ox.ac.uk /ohc   (940 words)

  
 Christ Church Oxford University UK - Home
This twelfth century church is amongst the oldest buildings in Oxford, and one of the smallest Anglican cathedrals in England.
The Cathedral is the mother church of the Diocese of Oxford, and many special services take place attended by the Bishop of Oxford.
It is here that the Bishop has his throne or 'cathedra', from which a cathedral takes its name.
www.chch.ox.ac.uk /cathedral   (256 words)

  
 Virtual Tour of Oxford
Highlighted in the Oxford Today, Oxford Times (twice), Oxford Mail, What's On in Oxford and the Oxford Star.
JRR Tolkien's Oxford" - explore some of the favourite places of Oxford resident JRR Tolkien, author of 'The Lord of the Rings'.
The Virtual Tour of Oxford was designed by Dr. Karl Harrison who works in the Department of Chemistry.
www.chem.ox.ac.uk /oxfordtour   (338 words)

  
 Oxford taxi or minibus travel - airport transportation for Oxfordshire UK.
Oxford taxi or minibus travel - airport transportation for Oxfordshire UK.
We cover everywhere in Oxford and most of Oxfordshire.
Oxford taxis, minibuses, airport cars, for transportation to and from London Heathrow or London Gatwick.
www.oxicars.com   (144 words)

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