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Topic: Pahlavi script


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In the News (Wed 24 Apr 19)

  
  Evertype: ISO/IEC JTC1/SC2/WG2 and Unicode
N2947R: Proposal for encoding the Lepcha script in the BMP of the UCS
N2362R: Revised proposal for encoding the Shavian script in the SMP of the UCS.
N2361R: Revised proposal to encode the Osmanya script in the SMP of the UCS.
www.evertype.com /formal.html   (3938 words)

  
 Ancient Scripts: Pahlavi
The Pahlavi script was used to record the Pahlavi or Middle Persian language that was spoken in pre-Islamic Iran between 3rd century BCE and 9th century CE.
The Pahlavi script was used extensively to write new Zoroastrian religious texts as well as translate existing Avestan scriptures as well.
The Pahlavi script continued to be written for the next 300 years, but it was slowly phased out by an Arabic-derived alphabet modified for Persian.
www.ancientscripts.com /pahlavi.html   (0 words)

  
  Pahlavi script
The Pahlavi script was used broadly in the Sasanid Persian Empire to write down Middle Persian for secular, as well as religious purposes.
The word Pahlavi, referring to the script of Middle Persian, itself is a borrowing from Parthian (parthau "Parthian" → pahlaw; the semivowel glide r changes to l, a common occurrence in language evolution).
After the fall of the Sasanians, the Pahlavi script, as well as Middle Persian language, was preserved by the Zoroastrian clergy and scholars and was used to compose new pieces of literature.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/p/pa/pahlavi_script.html   (646 words)

  
  Pahlavi script - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Pahlavi script was used broadly in the Sassanid Empire to write down Middle Persian for secular, as well as religious purposes.
The word Pahlavi, referring to the script of Middle Persian, itself is a borrowing from Parthian (parthau "Parthian" → pahlaw; the semivowel glide r changes to l, a common occurrence in language evolution).
After the fall of the Sassanids, the Pahlavi script, as well as Middle Persian language, was preserved by the Zoroastrian clergy and scholars and was used to compose new pieces of literature.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Pahlavi_script   (578 words)

  
 Alphabet
In the wider sense, an alphabet is a script that is ''segmental'' on the phoneme level, that is, that has separate glyphs for individual sounds and not for larger units such as syllables or words.
The earliest known alphabet in the wider sense is the Wadi el-Hol script, believed to be an abjad, which through its successor Phoenician became the ancestor of or inspiration for all later alphabets; the first alphabet in the narrower sense was the Greek alphabet.
In the Pollard script, an abugida, vowels are indicated by diacritics, but the placement of the diacritic relative to the consonant is modified to indicate the tone.
www.seattleluxury.com /encyclopedia/entry/alphabet   (2423 words)

  
 Middle Persian - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The most important and distinct development in the structure of Iranian languages in the Middle Period (in the Mid-Wes Iran, Iranian languages), is its transformation from the synthetic form of the Old Period (Old Persian and Avestan) to an analytic form i.e.
The substitution of Arabic script for Pahlavi script.
Pahlavi Middle Persian is the language of quite a large body of Zoroastrian literature which details the traditions and prescriptions of the Zoroastrian religion which was the state religion of Sassanid Iran (224 to ca.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Middle_Persian   (434 words)

  
 China encyclopedia : Cultural Information , Maps, China politics and officials, China History. Travel to China
As a side effect of its development, the script was also used to render the Pazend language, a form of Middle Persian that was used primarily for the Zend commentaries on the texts of the Avesta.
The Pahlavi script, upon which Din dabireh is based, was in common use for representing middle Persian, but was not adequate for representing Avestan since Pahlavi was an abjad syllabry which only contained a handful of consonant characters (most with multiple pronunciations), and left most vowels unexpressed.
Pahlavi script had at most 22 characters (the number varied by region and epoch), and as "Book Pahlavi", the most common form of the script, had only 12 characters representing 24 sounds.
www.chinaiworld.com /wiki-Avestan_alphabet   (762 words)

  
 American RadioWorks - My Name Is Iran
SCRIPT: Radio Farda, the Persian service of Radio Liberty recently reported that a prominent journalist in Iran had said publicly that the judicial system was so corrupt that it should be completely shut down and revamped like the in the time of Davar.
SCRIPT: In the law of retribution, the decision to punish is left to the victim, rather than a court, which represents society as a whole.
SCRIPT: The American Enterprise Institute, a think-tank with strong ties to the Bush Administration, is hosting a town hall meeting that is being fed to Iran from a radio station based in Los Angeles.
americanradioworks.publicradio.org /features/iran/htmlversion/transcript.html   (6810 words)

  
 Iranica.com - PAHLAVI PSALTER
Andreas dated the somewhat archaic writing of the Pahlavi Psalter to the first quarter of the 5th century (410-20).
However, Skjaervø (1983) argued that the perfectly correct language of the Pahlavi Psalter indicates that its translator was so familiar with Middle Persian that it had to be his mother tongue.
He showed that the Psalter was written as early as the 4th century, because it follows the same orthographic and grammatical rules which apply to the Sasanian inscriptions of the 3rd century.
www.iranica.com /newsite/articles/sup/Pahlavi_Psalter.html   (0 words)

  
 8.1 The Institute of Manuscripts Early Alphabets in Azerbaijan - Dr. Farid Alakbarov
Despite the fact that the Arabic script was in use between the 7th century and 1929, few young people in the Azerbaijan Republic can read it these days, even though their grandparents grew up learning it at school.
According to ancient Assyrian and Greek sources, this script was used in Southern Azerbaijan (Kingdom of Manna) during the 9th century BC.
Pahlavis (Partheans) were the ancient tribes from Afghanistan and Central Asia that conquered Iran and Azerbaijan in the 3rd century B.C. However, the Pahlavi books kept in our Institute are editions of the Avesta that were reprinted at the beginning of the 20th century; they're not originals.
www.azeri.org /Azeri/az_english/81_folder/81_articles/81_manuscripts.html   (1948 words)

  
 SCRIPT
Although the scribes were using cuneiform script for centuries it, never occurred to them before, and it was under the Iranians that it was developed into an alphabet denoting sound.
After the Arab conquest, they forced their inferior script on the people of Iran, in fact it was the Iranians who for the first time organized and wrote the grammar for the Arabic language and made it useable.
Although the Arabic script was not capable of recording the sounds of Paarsi language even after addition of additional alphabets not found in Arabic such as PH - CHA - JAH - GH; it became the official script for writing Paarsi.
www.ahura.homestead.com /files/IranZaminEight/HISTORY_OF_PERSIAN___SCRIPT.htm   (2092 words)

  
 Iran home of best Quranic scripts: expert
Mojtabaii is scheduled to deliver a lecture at an international seminar on Iranian scripts sponsored by the Ministry of Culture and Islamic Guidance to be held in Tehran from July 4 to 6.
Referring to the Pahlavi and Kufic scripts, he said, “The scripts have Aramaic origins, but after the advent of Islam, people began ignoring the Pahlavi script due to their zeal to write the Quran in Arabic.
Pahlavi, a branch of Middle Persian, was the language of Zoroastrian literature from the 3rd to the 10th century CE.
www.mehrnews.ir /en/NewsDetail.aspx?NewsID=200413   (195 words)

  
 Persian and Iranian scripts
This script is consist of 36 syllabic characters, 2 separations of words, sings for numerals and 8 ideograms.
Pahlavi script had a lot of modification and each of this counted different amount of characters.
Difficulty of use Pahlavi script caused that in later Sasanian period, Middle Persian texts was written in Avestan script.
www.iran.krakow.pl /scripts.htm   (1000 words)

  
 pahlavi | English | Dictionary & Translation by Babylon
The Pahlavi script was used broadly in the Sassanid Empire to write down Middle Persian for secular, as well as religious purposes.
Pahlavi was the language of the northeastern people of Iran (Parthians) who ruled over the country soon after the downfall of Ach Achaemenids until 224 AD under the name of Arsacids.
Pahlavi belongs to the Iranian class of the southern division of Aryan languages.
www.babylon.com /definition/pahlavi   (0 words)

  
 Commemorative of the 2500th anniversary of the Persian empire
Script: "Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi Aryamehr Shahanshah-e Iran" (Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, The sun of Arians, The king of kings of Iran); 25 Rials; 1350/1951.
Script: "Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi Aryamehr Shahanshah-e Iran" (Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, The sun of Arians, The king of kings of Iran); 75 Rials ; 1350/1951.
Script: "Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi Aryamehr Shahanshah-e Iran" (Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, The sun of Arians, The king of kings of Iran); 200 Rials ; 1350/1951.
irancollection.alborzi.com /2500/Silvers.htm   (390 words)

  
 amitis.org - <amitis.org />   (Site not responding. Last check: )
It differs from its predecessors in that the Pahlavi words are given in a phonemic transcription representing, as far as it is deducible from the evidence, the pronunciation they would have had in the third century of our era, the period of the rise of the Sassanian empire.
Pahlavi letters are often distorted, or joined irregularly, in such a way that they coincide with other letters, so producing even greater ambiguity.
When the Pahlavi spelling of the present stem of a verb coincides with part of that of the infinitive, however much they differ in transcription, the transliteration is given in abbreviated form, with a hyphen.
www.amitis.org /lil/cpd/cpd-intro.php   (2216 words)

  
 [No title]
PAHLAVI a script developed in Persia in the 2nd century B.C., used until the 7th century A.D., when it was replaced by Arabic.
The Ethiopic script is derived from the South Arabic script.
TIBETAN a script derived from Brahmi, emerging in the 9th century A.D. a derivative of the ancient Berber script, still used by the Tuaregs, and especially by women.
www.zum.de /whkmla/images/scripts/scriptslz.html   (502 words)

  
 Showcases :: Zoroastrian lawbook, the Videvdad
The Pahlavi script is derived from Aramaic, the chief administrative language of the Achaemenid Empire (550-330 BC).
The script of the Zoroastrian Pahlavi manuscripts is a calligraphic cursive script.
Unlike Pahlavi, but like Greek, which may have served as a model, it is a phonetic script with characters for both vowels and consonants - 53 in all, including 16 different vowel signs.
www.bl.uk /onlinegallery/themes/asianafricanman/lawbook.html   (970 words)

  
 Alphabets - Babel Babble - UniLang
Until that time the Armenian language was written partly with the Greek script and partly with so-called “Assyrian” letters which were in fact the Sassanide version of the Pahlavi script developed by the Persians.
The development of the Armenian script is attributed to a civil servant at the Armenian royal court who later became a monk and Christian missionary.
Their script is not only a means to fix the language for the Armenians, but serves also as symbol of the Armenian culture.
home.unilang.org /babelbabble/index.php?t=3&n=11   (769 words)

  
 alphabet Information Center - graffiti alphabet
On the other hand, the asl alphabet Phagspa script of the Mongol Empire was based closely on the Tibetan abugida, but all vowel marks were written after the preceding consonant rather than as diacritic marks.
The Book Pahlavi script, an abjad, had only twelve letters at one point, and may have letters of the alphabet had even fewer later on.
In later Pahlavi alphabet activities papyri, up to half of the graffiti alphabet remaining graphic distinctions were lost, and the script could no longer be read as a sequence of letters chinese alphabet at all, but calligraphy alphabet had to be learned as word symbols – that is, as logograms like Egyptian Demotic.
www.scipeeps.com /Sci-Linguistic_Topics_A_-_Co/alphabet.html   (2270 words)

  
 Avestan : Lacrimae Rerum
When Avestan was finally written down again, it was written in the Pahlavi script, which was used for Middle Persian.
This script is an abjad syllabry, meaning that there are primarily consonants in the alphabet.
Pahlavi has a few forms, but the most common one, Book Pahlavi, had just twelve characters to represent twenty-four sounds.
skatje.com /?p=227   (550 words)

  
 THE MINNESOTA IRANIAN FONT FAMILY   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Pahlavi presents a special challenge to the fontographer because its enormous body of ligatures creates a nearly limitless character set.
We have named the font "Khusro" after the Sassanian king Khusro I. A second font, Ardashir, is a slightly modified version of Khusro for use in academic citations and footnotes.
This is a sample text taken from the beginning of Book VII of the Pahlavi Denkard, which demonstrates the font's capabilities.
cnes.cla.umn.edu /resources/IranianPages/pahlavi_fonts.htm   (599 words)

  
 Iran - Printer-friendly - MSN Encarta
An ancient literary language, Persian was written in the Pahlavi script before the Arab conquest in the 7th century.
A new form written in the Arabic script developed during the 9th and 10th centuries; this is the basis of the Modern Persian language used today (see Persian Language; Arabic Language: Arabic Script).
As recently as 1950 there were several distinct dialects of spoken Persian, but due to the spread of public education and broadcast media, a standard spoken form, with minor regional accents, has evolved.
encarta.msn.com /text_761567300___10/Iran.html   (1954 words)

  
 Greatest Inventions-- The Alphabet
Pollard script (an abugida), vowels are indicated by diacritics, but the placement of the vowel relative to the consonant indicates the tone.
Pahlavi script, an abjad, had only 12 letters.
In later Pahlavi papyri, half of the remaining distinctions were lost, and the script could no longer be read as a sequence of letters at all, but had to be learned as word symbols – that is, as logograms like Egyptian
www.edinformatics.com /inventions_inventors/alphabet.htm   (2709 words)

  
 Iranian Language Family
Middle Persian documents written in the purpose-made Manichean script are of utmost importance for the study of the language.
This script, much like the Pahlavi script, was also an Aramaic derived writing system with varieties that were used to record the language of many north Arabian tribes before Islam.
Kurdish is written in various scripts, using the Perso-Arabic script in Iran and Iraq, Latin alphabet in Turkey and Syria, and Cyrillic in Armenia and Azerbaijan.
www.iranologie.com /history/ilf.html   (4556 words)

  
 Banknotes - IRAN COLLECTION
The Farsi script of imperial bank of Iran was printed at the top side and the value of the banknote in the middle.
The first issues of banknotes in Pahlavi era were printed in 1932 in 6 denominations: 5, 10, 20, 50, 100 and 500 Rials.
This time only the portrait of Reza Shah Pahlavi was changed to the one with a larger cap and the 1000 Rials banknotes were released.
irancollection.alborzi.com /banknotes.html   (1005 words)

  
 Middle Persian scripts - Pahlavi, Parthian and Psalter
The Middle Persian script developed from the Aramaic script and became the official script of the Sassanian empire (224-651 AD).
The Parthian script developed from the Aramaic script around the 2nd century BC and was used during the Parthian and early Sassanian periods of the Persian empire.
The Psalter script is a variant of the Persian script which was used mainly for writing on paper.
www.omniglot.com /writing/mpersian.htm   (0 words)

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