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Topic: Palace of Whitehall


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  Whitehall - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Whitehall is a road in Westminster in London, the capital of the United Kingdom.
The name is taken from the vast Palace of Whitehall that used to occupy the surrounding area but was largely destroyed by fire in 1698.
Whitehall and the surrounding area is the administrative centre of the UK government; it is dominated by government buildings, to such an extent that the term is often used, by extension, to refer to the Civil service of the United Kingdom or the government itself.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Whitehall   (526 words)

  
 Buckingham Palace - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
The palace, originally known as Buckingham House, was a large townhouse built for the Duke of Buckingham in 1703 and acquired by King George III in 1762 as a private residence.
Petersburg and at Tsarskoe Selo, the Papal Palace in Rome, the Royal Palace of Madrid, or indeed the former Palace of Whitehall.
The principal rooms of the palace are contained on the piano nobile behind the west-facing garden facade at the rear of the palace.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Buckingham_House   (6646 words)

  
 Palace of Whitehall - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Palace of Whitehall was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698 when all except Inigo Jones' 1622 Banqueting House was destroyed by fire.
By the 13th century, the Palace of Westminster had become the centre of government in England, and had been the main London residence of the king since 1049.
In 1691, when the palace was the largest palace complex in Europe — and a jumble of buildings — a fire destroyed much of the older palace structures.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Palace_of_Whitehall   (813 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
The term Whitehall is used to describe the administrative centre of the UK government.
Whitehall is a road in London, England running past the Houses of Parliament from Trafalgar Square, but the term refers to the surrounding area and its government offices, and the term is often used by extension to refer to the British Civil Service or the UK government itself.
The name Whitehall derives from the vast Palace of Whitehall that used to occupy the surrounding area.
www.askmytutor.co.uk /w/wh/whitehall.html   (159 words)

  
 Term paper on Buckingham Palace
During the reign of HM [[Queen Elizabeth II, the palace interiors have been open for public viewing for the first time in its history.]] The principal rooms of the palace are contained on the piano nobile behind the west-facing garden facade at the rear of the palace.
So rigid was the palace dress code that after World War I when Queen Mary wished to follow fashion by raising her skirts a few inches from the ground, she asked a Lady-in-Waiting to shorten her skirt first to gauge the King's (her husband's) reaction.
Buckingham Palace with the [[Union Flag projected onto it for Christmas Eve 2003.]] In addition to being the weekday home of The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh the palace is the work place of 450 people.
www.termpapertopic.org /bu/buckingham-palace.html   (4783 words)

  
 Whitehall Hotel
Whitehall was originally a wide road that ran up to the front of the palace, while Parliament Street was a small side road alongside the palace leading to the Houses of Parliament.
The Banqueting House is on the left.]] The Palace of Whitehall was the main residence of the English monarchs in London from 1530 until 1698 when all except Inigo Jones' 1622 Banqueting House was destroyed by fire.
Whitehall is also a type of row boat, named for its original place of manufacture, the end of Whitehall street in New_York_City.
www.artistbooking.com /trips/227/whitehall-hotel.html   (1181 words)

  
 Palace of Westminster - InfoSearchPoint.com   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
The Palace of Westminster is the home of both Houses of Parliament in the United Kingdom.
It was originally (and still officially is) a Royal Palace, which led to the area becoming the centre of government in the United Kingdom as it transitioned from a monarchy to a parliamentary democracy.
The palace was the main London residence of the monarchs of England until Henry VIII took over the Palace of Whitehall in 1530.
www.infosearchpoint.com /display/Palace_of_Westminster   (420 words)

  
 Pepys' Diary: Whitehall Palace
Whitehall became the chief London residence of the court….
It was on a scaffold outside the Banqueting House, Whitehall, that King Charles I. was beheaded on Jan. 30, 1649.
Whitehall Palace - According to the works accounts of 1623-4, Isaac de Caus, a fashionable garden designer, grotto builder and engineer, was paid to create a shell grotto in the cellars of Inigo Jones’s Banqueting Hall around this time.
www.pepysdiary.com /p/180.php   (1345 words)

  
 Palace
Seven or eight le to the west of the city there is what is called the King's New Monastery, the building of which took eighty years, and extended over three reigns.
One of the images, on the left of the palace door, was a magnificent colossus, shining through the dusky air like a sentinel who has taken the alarm.
They are now latterly in Paris itself, safe in their own "little palace (PETIT PALAIS) at the point of the Isle;" little jewel of a house on the Isle St. Louis, which they are warming again, after long absence in Brussels and the barbarous countries.
www.cooldictionary.com /words/Palace.word   (437 words)

  
 Whitehall Palace --  Encyclopædia Britannica
Whitehall has been the site of principal government offices since the establishment of Henry VIII's court at Whitehall Palace...
The late designs of Inigo Jones for Whitehall Palace (1638) and Queen's Chapel (1623) in London introduced English patrons to the prevailing architectural ideas of northern Italy in the late 16th century.
At the north end of Whitehall are the Ministry of Defense, the Admiralty, the Scotland Office, and the Treasury.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9076857   (806 words)

  
 Whitehall, London, 1819, History   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
On the bank of the Thames, at the east confines of St. Margaret's parish, was a palace called Whitehall, originally built by Hubert de Burgh, earl of Kent, before the middle of the 13th century.
At this period it became the residence of the court; but in 1697 all was destroyed by accidental fire, except the banqueting-house, which had been added to the palace of Whitehall by James I., according to a design of Inigo Jones.
This is an elegant and magnificent structure of hewn stone, adorned with an upper and lower range of pillars, of the ionic and Composite order :—the capitals are enriched with fruit and foliages, and also between the columns of the windows.
www.londonancestor.com /leighs/pb-whitehall.htm   (197 words)

  
 Palace of Westminster bei eLexi - das Onlinelexikon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
The Palace of Westminster, on the banks of the River Thames in Westminster, London, is the home of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, which together form the Parliament of the United Kingdom.
Edward the Confessor established the origins of the present buildings by building a royal palace on the site from 1050, and until 1529 Westminster was the main London residence of successive monarchs.
The Palace of Westminster occupies a site of approximately 3.24 hectares (8 acres) on the west bank of the Thames as it runs from south to north on one of its serpentine diversions through the city.
www.elexi.de /en/p/pa/palace_of_westminster.html   (997 words)

  
 [No title]
St James's Palace was built between 1532 and 1540 by Henry VIII on the site of the Hospital of St James, Westminster.
This role was created in the 15th century and his responsibilities were to choose the music and anthems to be sung, authorise absences and prescribe penalties for minor offences that could be dealt with without recourse to the Dean.
James's Palace is the senior Palace of the Sovereign, with a long history as a royal residence.
angl.by.ru /palaces/new_page_1.htm   (588 words)

  
 Westminster Palace, London, England
The Palace of Westminster, known also as the Houses of Parliament, is where the two Houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (the House of Lords and the House of Commons) conduct their sittings.
The Palace lies on the north bank of the River Thames in the London borough of the City of Westminster.
The Palace of Westminster occupies a site of 32,400 m² hectares (8 acres) on the west bank of the Thames as it runs from south to north on one of its serpentine diversions through the city.
www.magicaljourneys.com /England/england-interest-london-westminsterpalace.html   (1637 words)

  
 Royalty Restored or London under Charles II - Chapter VII   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
It was notable the countess did not accompany her majesty in the procession to Whitehall, as one of her attendants; but in fact she had not obtained the position sought for, though she enjoyed all the privileges pertaining to such an appointment.
Whitehall, the scene of so much gaiety and gallantry, was a palace by no means befitting the luxurious Charles.
Accordingly, in the second year of the merry monarch's reign he presented himself at Whitehall, and was received by Charles with a graciousness that served to obliterate the memory of his late misfortune.
www.worldwideschool.org /library/books/hst/english/RoyaltyRestoredorLondonunderCharlesII/chap8.html   (4460 words)

  
 Historic Royal Palaces   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
The Banqueting House is the only remaining complete building of Whitehall Palace, the sovereign`s principal residence from 1530 until 1698 when it was destroyed by fire.
Henry VIII acquires York Place, which is renamed Whitehall Palace, and transforms it into the largest royal palace in Europe.
Fire destroys Whitehall Palace; the Banqueting House survives and is used as a chapel until 1890.
www.hrp.org.uk /webcode/timeline.asp?ID=73   (231 words)

  
 Contemporary Review: Whitehall Palace: An Architectural History of the Royal Apartments, 1240-1690. - Review - book ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Whitehall Palace now survives in its famous Banqueting Hall, the backdrop for Charles I's martyrdom.
The history of Whitehall Palace shows how English monarchs were never quite able to build a palace to equal the great structures of European monarchies.
The loss of Whitehall also helped in the gradual split between the Monarch and government simply because they could no longer be within one complex.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_m2242/is_1612_276/ai_62925787   (313 words)

  
 Buckingham Palace
The new palace exterior was constructed of honey-hued Bath Stone in the Neo-classical French design favored by George III and boasted a marble arch, the centerpiece of the enlarged courtyard that was built to commemorate the British victories at Trafalgar and Waterloo.
The palace interior and grounds also underwent a gradual metamorphosis into the stately, 600 room royal palace it is today.
The Palace bosts a 40 acre garden, a movie theater, swimming pool and the Queen's private art collection (opened to the public in 1962.) In addition, the Royal Mews, designed by Nash in 1825, house the state carriages and royal ceremonial apparel.
www.angelfire.com /in/uktravelinfo/buckingham.html   (1179 words)

  
 The Royal Residences > St James's Palace > History
The palace was built by Henry VIII on the site of the Hospital of St. James, Westminster.
After the destruction of the Palace of Whitehall, all monarchs until William IV lived at St. James's for part of the time.
In 1809, much of the east and south ranges of the Palace was destroyed by fire, but the State rooms were restored by 1813.
www.royal.gov.uk /output/Page589.asp   (647 words)

  
 Society of Antiquaries of London - Books in print   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
This rich assortment of objects was charged upon Sir Anthony Denny, the Palace Keeper, and was housed within the king's privy lodging at Whitehall.
Hs role as the Keeper of Whitehall Palace is less well known, but there is a wealth of documentation, which allows the study of this aspect of his career in some depth.
This group of four contemporary documents provides a unique glimpse into the way in which the Palace of Whitehall was furnished and managed in the 1540s and how Henry VIII's possessions were redistributed amongst his properties on his death.
www.sal.org.uk /books/reviews/1542_inventory/default.php   (316 words)

  
 Untitled   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-07)
Of the Cardinal’s possessions York Place was the most important to the King, because the royal palace at Westminster had been largely destroyed by fire in 1512 and Henry had been staying at Lambeth Palace as a substitute.
The main buildings of the palace, including the great hall, chapel and royal apartments, stood on the east side of the road (the side of the present Banqueting House); stretching to the river.
The ceremonial use of Whitehall Palace demanded a number of large communal spaces for entertainment which included the great hall and the chapel, but as time went on a number of temporary structures were constructed for special occasions.
www.solutions.co.uk /clients/hrp/bh/hista.htm   (897 words)

  
 Westminster, Whitehall & Belgravia London
Westminster boasts the gothic Victorian Houses of Parliament, Westminster Abbey and the monarch's London residence, Buckingham Palace.
Whitehall is a broad avenue connecting Parliament Square to Trafalgar Square.
The name is taken from the original palace of Whitehall which was the London seat of the Archbishop of York.
www.1st4londonhotels.co.uk /guide/overview/westminster.shtml   (244 words)

  
 The Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club - Cavaliers as Companions
King Henry VIII who was on the throne at the time, confiscated the building, renamed it the Palace of Whitehall, and added to it considerably as time went on.
Not everyone at the palace was enamored by the dogs: Samuel Pepys records in his diary his annoyance at this fact that the dogs would follow the King to Council meetings where they would 'run riot' during the proceedings when he, (Pepys) was Secretary to the Navy.
He is mostly known for his ancient role at the State Opening of Parliament, where he summons members of the Commons by knocking three times on their door with his staff, after having the first door slammed in his face, symbolizing the right of the Commons to freedom from interference.
www.thecavalierclub.co.uk /pets/aug04/compan.html   (1232 words)

  
 washingtonpost.com: The Pleasures of the Imagination: English Culture in the Eighteenth Century
It slipped out of palaces and into coffee houses, reading societies, debating clubs, assembly rooms, galleries and concert halls; ceasing to be the handmaiden of royal politics, it became the partner of commerce.
In the chief palace, at Whitehall, the king's private servants and officials lived crammed together in close proximity to the monarch.
The vast, rambling palace at Whitehall, with its chapel, theatre and 1,400 rooms, was full of court servants, wits, rakes, ambassadors, musicians, minor functionaries, whores and hangers-on.
www.washingtonpost.com /wp-srv/style/longterm/books/chap1/pleasuresoftheimagination.htm   (4250 words)

  
 Whitehall Palace -- An Architectural History of the Royal Apartments, 1240-1698 -- Simon Thurley
Whitehall Palace was the principal residence of the British monarchy from 1529 to 1698, when fire destroyed the majority of the complex.
Thurley traces the development of the palace from its origins, using previously unpublished archaeological evidence to establish that York Place, as it was then called, was already one of the largest and most important residences in London before it became a royal palace.
Throughout, the book is illustrated with specially commissioned plans and diagrams of Whitehall as well as unique photographs taken while the palace was being excavated in the 1930s.
www.frontlist.com /detail/0300076398   (215 words)

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