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Topic: Palestine Liberation Front


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In the News (Sun 22 Oct 17)

  
  Palestine Liberation Front - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In 1967 the PLF merged with two other groups, the Arab Nationalist Movement-affiliated Heroes of the Return (abtal al-awda) and The Youth of the Revenge Group, to form the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP).
The faction headed by Tal'at Ya'akub, the general secretary of the PLF, remained neutral in the struggle between the various organizations and settled its forces in Lebanon.
In May 1990, the PLF lauched an attack on Israel's Nizanim beach, near Tel-Aviv, urged on by Iraq to torpedo the moves towards a negotiated solution between the PLO and Israel.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Palestine_Liberation_Front   (1030 words)

  
 Terrorism - In the Spotlight: The Palestine Liberation Front (PLF)
In December 1967, PLF joined forces with the Heroes of the Return and The Youth of Revenge groups to form the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP).
Jibril formed a new organization, the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine — General Command (PFLP-GC) in 1968 after splitting from the PFLP in April of that year.
Despite changes in leadership, the PLF stayed true to its objective: destruction of the state of Israel and the establishment of a Palestinian state.
www.cdi.org /terrorism/plf.cfm   (1067 words)

  
 Palestine Liberation Front
The Palestinian Liberation Front (PLF) was set up on April 24, 1977 due to a split in the The Popular Front for Liberation of Palestine - General Command.
The PLF was essentially active on the Israeli northern border and staged attacks against civilian and military targets, trying also to take hostages during its operations.
The general secretary, Abu Abbas, was elected to the PLO's executive committee and the PLF actually became a satellite of Fatah, although the organization was supported, logistically and in training, by Libya and Iraq.
www.ict.org.il /inter_ter/orgdet.cfm?orgid=29   (1279 words)

  
 Palestine Liberation Organization - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
The Palestine Liberation Organization is considered the legitimate representative of the Palestinian people and holds a permanent observer seat in the UN General Assembly.
The Rejectionist Front opposed Arafat's growing calls for diplomacy from the mid-1970s, perhaps best symbolized by his support for a UN Security Council resolution proposed in 1976 calling for a two-state settlement on the pre-1967 borders and his Ten Points Program, which was denounced by the Rejectionist Front (and vetoed by the United States).
In the late 1960s and early 1970s, the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, the second-largest PLO faction after al-Fatah, carried out a number of attacks and plane hijackings mostly directed at Israel, most infamously the Dawson's Field hijackings, which precipitated the Black September in Jordan crisis.
www.arikah.net /encyclopedia/PLO   (4091 words)

  
 Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In 1969, the Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine (DFLP) formed as a separate, ostensibly Maoist, organization under Niaf Hawatmeh and Yasser Abd Rabbo, initially as the PDFLP.
The PFLP joined the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO), the umbrella organization of the Palestinian national movement, in 1968, becoming the second-largest faction after Yassir Arafat's Fatah.
In 1974, it withdrew from the organization's executive committee (but not from the PLO) to join the Rejectionist Front, accusing the PLO of abandoning the goal of destroying Israel outright in favor of a binational solution, which was opposed by the PFLP leadership.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Popular_Front_for_the_Liberation_of_Palestine   (2350 words)

  
 Palestine Liberation Organization - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (Arabic: Munazzamat al-Tahrir Filastiniyyah منظمة التحرير الفلسطينية) is a political and paramilitary organization of Palestinian Arabs dedicated to the establishment of an independent Palestinian state.
The Palestine Liberation Organization is considered the legitimate representative of the Palestinian people and hold a permanent observation seat in the UN General Assembly.
The PLO's Rejection Front opposed Arafat's growing calls for diplomacy from the mid-1970s, perhaps best symbolized by his support for a UN Security Council resolution proposed in 1976 calling for a two-state settlement on the pre-1967 borders and his Ten Points Program, which was denounced by the Rejection Front (and vetoed by the United States).
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/PLO   (2763 words)

  
 Palestine Liberation Front
They claimed that the unity of the Islamic world was not a precondition for the liberation of Palestine, but on the contrary, the liberation of Palestine by the Islamic movements was the key to the unification of the Arab and Islamic world.
He was liberated in the framework of an exchange of prisoners in 1985.
The Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine - General Command (PFLP-GC), under the leadership of Ahmad Jibril, is one of the Palestinian organizations known for their unequivocal rejection of any kind of political settlement with Israel, and their reliance on international terrorism to thwart any political process.
www.eyespymag.com /terrorgroupsP-Q.htm   (6015 words)

  
 Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine - Biocrawler   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
The Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) (Arabic الجبهة الشعبية لتحرير فلسطين - al-Jabhah al-Sha'abiyah li-Tahrīr Filasṭīn) is a secular, Marxist-Leninist, nationalist Palestinian organization, founded after the Six-Day War in 1967.
Although the PFLP had joined the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO), the umbrella organization of the Palestinian national movement, in 1968, becoming the second-largest faction after al-Fatah, it withdrew in 1974, accusing the PLO of abandoning the goal of destroying Israel outright in favor of a binational solution, which was opposed by the PFLP leadership.
Two factions that broke away from PFLP are the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine - General Command (PFLP-GC) and the Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine (DFLP).
www.biocrawler.com /encyclopedia/PFLP   (1050 words)

  
 Terrorism - In the Spotlight: The Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine-General Command (PFLP-GC)
The Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine-General Command (PFLP-GC) is a pan-Arab, secular, Marxist-Leninist group that stands out among Palestinian organizations for its adamant rejection of any political settlement with Israel and its reliance on state sponsorship.
The PLF merged with George Habash's leftist Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) in 1967.
The breakaway PLF was repelled by Jibril's activities against Palestinians in support of Syria during the 1976 civil war in Lebanon.
www.cdi.org /terrorism/pflp-gc.cfm   (1054 words)

  
 Palestinian Political Parties and Organizations   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
In the context of ‎this confrontation, the Palestine problem is the core of a Western offensive that ‎began with Napoleon’s invasion of Egypt in 1798 and reached its climax in 1918 ‎with the disintegration of the Ottoman Empire, which had symbolized Islamic ‎unity.
Inasmuch as the Jewish presence in Palestine symbolizes Muslim inferiority in ‎the modern age, commitment to Palestine cannot be framed in the narrow ‎confines of Palestinian nationalism.
The Palestine Liberation Front (Jabhat al-Tahrir al-Filastiniyya) was formed by Muhammed Abu ‘Abbas Zaydan (Abu-l-‘Abbas) and Tal‘at Ya‘qub in Apr77, after split from PFLP-GC due to its support for Syria’s attacks on PLO in Lebanon in 1976 and open clashes between wings in Lebanon led to its separate existence, in an ‘Arafat-brokered compromise.
www.mideastweb.org /palestianparties.htm   (9731 words)

  
 [No title]
The Palestinian Liberation Front was founded by Muhammad Zaidan (better known as Abu Abbas) and Talat Yaakub in 1977 when they split from the PFLP - GC [link] over its support for Syria in the Lebanese civil war.
In the late 1980s Abbas folded the group into the Palestine Liberation Organization after being elected to the PLO's executive committee.
The PLF continues to operate cells in the West Bank and Gaza, but Israeli raids and the death of Abbas have significantly eroded its strength.
www.adl.org /terrorism/symbols/palestinian_liberation_front.asp   (396 words)

  
 Palestine-UN.org   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
In the autumn of 1948, the matter became urgent and on 23 September, the Government of All of Palestine was established, headed by Mr.
The Arab leadership of the Al-Baath party in Iraq formed the Arab Liberation Front, which was preceded by the establishment of Al-Sa’ika by the Al-Baath party in Syria.
It also reflected a sharp decrease in the representation of the Palestine Liberation Army (PLA) after it became clear that the brigades of the army remained part of the command of their respective Arab armies.
www.palestine-un.org /plo/back.html   (2593 words)

  
 AxisofLogic/ Palestine
March 11 2004-The Pentagon and the Palestine Liberation Front (PLF) confirmed late Tuesday the death of PLF leader and member of the PLO National Council Mohammad Abbas (Abu El-Abbas) while in the custody of US occupation forces in Iraq.
The PLF held the US responsible for Abbas’ death and said his family received a letter from him last week saying he was in good health.
The PLF held the US Administration and its occupation forces responsible for the death of Abbas, whom they were detaining without any legal justification and without filing any charges against him, Abu Yusef said.
www.axisoflogic.com /cgi-bin/exec/view.pl?archive=124&num=5661   (900 words)

  
 Fatah and the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine:
Fatah is a nationalist movement with the sole aim of liberating Palestine from what it sees as its colonial occupation by Zionism, and the establishment of an independent Palestinian state in its place.
The movement advocated Arab unity as a prerequisite for the liberation of Palestine.
PLF assets were: extensive military experience, bases in Syria, and a network of operatives in the West Bank.
www.ict.org.il /articles/articledet.cfm?articleid=145   (12001 words)

  
 [No title]
PLF Front for the Liberation of Palestine FLP Source: CIA, EuroTer, Interpol, MI-6 Type: Political terrorist organization Scope: Active terrorist organization carrying out actions on virtually all levels throughout Israel and the Middle East.
April, 1979, four operatives landed from the sea near Nahariyah, intending to seize Israeli hostages to be used in exchange for terrorists being held by the Israelis.
The PLF was established with Iraqi support, and it's existence as an independent group was recognized when it obtained seats on the Palestine National Council in 1981 with it's headquarters in Damascus.
members.tripod.com /~fantasian/plf.html   (588 words)

  
 Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP), Palestinian political grouping founded in December 1967, when several small guerrilla groups...
In August the military leader of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP), Abu Ali Mustafa, was killed by the Israelis.
The PLO was founded at a congress in the Jordanian sector of Jerusalem in May 1964.
uk.encarta.msn.com /Popular_Front_for_the_Liberation_of_Palestine.html   (143 words)

  
 BBC News | MIDDLE EAST | The Palestinian connection
It was a world veiled in secrecy, where the abundance of splinter groups reflected the fact that internecine rivalry often took the place of liberation as the major occupation of those involved.
Ahmad Jibril was born in Ramle, in Palestine in 1928, but his family moved to Syria and he became an officer in the Syrian army.
He set up the small Palestinian Liberation Front in 1959, joining forces in 1967 with fellow radical George Habash to found the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine.
news.bbc.co.uk /1/hi/world/middle_east/736490.stm   (761 words)

  
 [No title]
The Palestine Liberation Front (PLF) was founded by Amhed Jibril in 1959 for the purpose of employing acts of terrorism in the quest to establish a Palestinian state.
The PLF was re-established in 1977, and Abu Abbas assumed command.
In 2001, 15 members of the PLF were arrested by Israeli authorities after it was discovered that they were planning new attacks in Tel Aviv, Jerusalem, and the Ben Gurion airport; they were also implicated in the murder of an Israeli teenager.
www.discoverthenetwork.org /groupProfile.asp?grpid=6388   (257 words)

  
 Arafat's Iraqi Connection   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
The PLF is a member organization in the PLO that was responsible for the 1985 hijacking of the Achillo Lauro cruise ship.
The recently captured PLF unit was actually trained by Iraqi officers at the al-Quds military camp outside of Baghdad and enjoyed close ties with Iraqi intelligence.
PLF weaponry had been smuggled in a vehicle belonging to PA Security Chief General Abdul Razek Yehiye, who had benefited from immunity at Israeli checkpoints with his VIP pass ("How Arafat's Palestinian Authority Became an 'Entity Supporting Terrorism,'" Jerusalem Issue Brief, Vol.
www.jcpa.org /art/brief1-18.htm   (957 words)

  
 Palestine Liberation Organization - Gurupedia
Palestine Liberation Front (PLF), the Arab Liberation Front (ALF), the Popular Struggle Front (PSF) as well as other minor groups.
Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) broke away in 1974 accusing the PLO of moving away from the goal of destroying Israel outright in favor of a binational solution
During the al-Aqsa Intifada, the PLO leadership has maintained connections with its military wing, the Fatah, parts of which (the Al-Aqsa Martyrs' Brigades in particular) are held responsible for terrorist attacks against Israeli civilians as well as [guerrilla]] attacks on the IDF and Israeli security forces.
www.gurupedia.com /p/pl/plo.htm   (2550 words)

  
 Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO)
Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine (DFLP);
The PLO is governed by its parliament, the Palestine National Council (PNC), which is made up of representatives from the PLO member groups as well as independent members.
Most senior government positions in the PA are held by individuals who are members of, or loyal to, Arafat's Fatah faction of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO).
www.globalsecurity.org /military/world/para/plo.htm   (551 words)

  
 "Syria and Terrorism" by Boaz Ganor
In late 1968, Ahmed Jibril, a former Syrian engineering corps officer, left the "Habash Front." He and his companions established a new organization--the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine--General Command (PFLP-GC), and made commitment to armed struggle against Israel their motto.
In 1985, as a result of pressure on the part of Western countries, mainly the United States (and after a number of bloody attacks perpetrated by the organization in Europe), Syria was forced to limit its support for the organization and to close down most of its offices in Syrian territory.
The Democratic Front numbers about 1,000 members, most of whom are organized in nine battalions in Lebanon, although it also maintains bases and training camps in Syria.
www.jcpa.org /jl/saa26.htm   (4204 words)

  
 Palestine Liberation Front (PLF)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
The Palestine Liberation Front (PLF) broke away from the PFLP-GC in the late 1970s and later split again into pro-PLO, pro-Syrian, and pro-Libyan factions.
Current leadership and membership of the relatively small PLF appears to be based in Lebanon and the Palestinian territories.
The PLF has become more active since the start of the al-Aqsa intifadah and several PLF members have been arrested by Israeli authorities for planning attacks in Israel and the West Bank.
library.nps.navy.mil /home/tgp/plf.htm   (186 words)

  
 FrontPage magazine.com :: More Bad News for Daschle by Michael Ledeen
According to UPI, the Palestine Liberation Front said Thursday one of its guerrillas was killed during the U.S. missile strikes on Iraq.
A PLF statement released in the southern city of Sidon (Syrian-occupied Lebanon) identified the slain guerrilla as 1st Lieutenant Ahmed Walid Raguib al-Baz who was killed early Thursday "while confronting the treacherous U.S. air bombardment on Iraq."
The PLF has long been one of the most lethal Palestinian terrorist groups, and achieved notoriety for its high-tech killings.
www.frontpagemag.com /Articles/ReadArticle.asp?ID=6798   (382 words)

  
 Requiem for a Terrorist   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-01)
He took part in the various stations [along the way] of the national struggle, by establishing the fighting front and heading it...
Palestine Liberation Front spokesman and political bureau member Dr. Wasel Abu Yousef said: "Our front is proud to present its secretary general and its great founding commander as a martyr on the altar of freedom, unity, and common conscience."
With Abu Al-Abbas's death, we have lost one of the symbols of the Palestinian struggle who does not accept dictates and remains faithful to the liberation [of Palestine] and resistance to the occupation.
www.frontpagemag.com /articles/Printable.asp?ID=12754   (1032 words)

  
 Institute for Palestine Studies | Journals
In addition to being chairman of the PLOEC, Yasir Arafat is president of the State of Palestine as proclaimed on 15 November 1988 in Algiers by the Nineteenth PNC.
In contrast to his position as president of the State of Palestine, Yasir Arafat's presence at the head of the "Executive Authority of the Palestinian Council" is exclusively linked to the Oslo process and therefore limited in theory to the five-year interim period spelled out in the texts.
They are neither historic figures of the liberation struggle nor Fatah apparatchiks of long standing, and, as notables from the "inside," were installed in the PLOEC when Arafat needed support in the territories.
www.palestine-studies.org /final/en/journals/content.php?aid=2556&jid=1&iid=112&vid=XXVIII&vol=129   (6745 words)

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