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Topic: Parasympathetic nervous system


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In the News (Thu 18 Jul 19)

  
  Nervous System, Autonomic Information on Healthline   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
The enteric nervous system is the less common of the three and is responsible for coordinating the digestive functions of the gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, and gall bladder.
The synapses of the autonomic nervous system are outside of the brain and spinal cord of the central nervous system in specialized structures known as autonomic ganglia.
Identical to the parasympathetic nervous system, the preganglionic neurons of the sympathetic nervous system communicate by releasing the neurotransmitter acetylcholine.
www.healthline.com /galecontent/nervous-system-autonomic   (1082 words)

  
 The Parasympathetic Nervous System
The sympathetic system, on the other hand, is more mature at birth, and this evolutionary strategy enables the organism to be shaped by its interaction with the environment, which is mediated by mobilization behavior of the SNS (Schore, 1994).
The gradual maturation of the parasympathetic system is associated with the capacity to inhibit sympathetic activity, and results in a reduction in mobilization and baseline levels of arousal.
Parasympathetic activity is associated with inhibition of the intrinsic pacemaker of the heart, and results in a lower resting heart rate.
www.veroniquemead.com /pns.php   (2042 words)

  
 The Autonomic Nervous System
The autonomic nervous system is a part of the peripheral nervous system that functions to regulate the basic visceral (organ) processes needed for the maintenance of normal bodily functions.
A third division of the autonomic system, termed the enteric nervous system, consists of a collection of neurons embedded within the wall of the entire gastrointestinal tract and its derivatives.
The parasympathetic nervous system is organized in a manner similar to the sympathetic nervous system.
www.becomehealthynow.com /ebookprint.php?id=822   (2518 words)

  
 Lesson 9 - The Nervous System - Page 1   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
The nervous system consists of the brain, the spinal cord, and the network of nerves throughout the rest of the body.
The nervous system is composed of two major parts; the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS).
The nervous system is also divided into two physiological (or functional) divisions -- a voluntary system, which as the name implies is concerned with voluntary actions such as muscle movement; and an involuntary or automatic system referred to as the autonomic nervous system.
www.a-better-way.com /systems/9_1.html   (543 words)

  
 Parasympathetic
The autonomic nervous system (ANS), is divided anatomically into three components: the parasympathetic, with cranial and sacral connections; the sympathetic, with central nervous connections in the thoracic and lumbar segments of the spinal cord; and the enteric nervous system which occupies the digestive tract.
The parasympathetic and sympathetic components of the ANS control the involuntary body functions via the distribution of nerve fibers to the various organs and glands, whereas the enteric nervous system is involved primarily with the internal regulation of the gustatory processes.
The sensory nervous system is involved in generating messages of pain and other sensory modalities into the central nervous system to alert the brain of changes or challenges from the outside environment and to set the stage for the body’s response to these stimuli.
www.macses.ucsf.edu /Research/Allostatic/notebook/parasym.html   (2725 words)

  
 Autonomic Nervous System
The autonomic nervous system conveys sensory impulses from the blood vessels, the heart and all of the organs in the chest, abdomen and pelvis through nerves to other parts of the brain (mainly the brain stem which consists of the medulla, pons and hypothalamus).
Through these nervous pathways, the autonomic nerves convey stimuli resulting in largely unconscious, reflex, bodily adjustments such as in the size of the pupil, the digestive functions of the stomach and intestines, the rate and depth of respiration and dilatation or constriction of the blood vessels.
In the parasympathetic system, acetylcholine is responsible for most of these transmissions between the afferent and efferent nerves of the system and between the efferent nerve endings and the cells or organs that they subserve.
www.drwastl.org /files/autonomic.html   (1199 words)

  
 Nervous System Explained   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
The autonomic nervous system is further divided into two distinct branches, the sympathetic and the parasympathetic.
The two branches of the autonomic nervous system act as antagonists, that is, they tend to have opposite effects, kind of a yin/yang dichotomy.
Epinephrine, norepinephrine and dopamine are the principle neurotransmitters; in the sympathetic nervous system.
www.webnat.com /hi/NervousSystem.asp   (2881 words)

  
 NERVOUS SYSTEM   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
The nervous system is an internal communication system, relaying signals with short electrical impulses.
The central nervous system is composed of the brain and spinal cord.
The parasympathetic nervous system normalizes the body by balancing it to the state it was in before the stimulus occurred.
www.webnat.com /educ/clNervousSys.asp   (911 words)

  
 Parasympathetic nervous system - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The parasympathetic nervous system is one of three divisions of the autonomic nervous system.
Sometimes called the rest and digest system, the parasympathetic system conserves energy as it slows the heart rate, increases intestinal and gland activity, and relaxes sphincter muscles in the gastrointestinal tract.
The parasympathetic division is a division of the the visceral (autonomic) branch of the PNS (peripheral nervous system).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Parasympathetic_nervous_system   (643 words)

  
 Nervous System
The nervous system's jobs are to protect your body from harm, notify your body when fuel is needed, maintain balance in most situaions, shut itself down in times of rest, and adapt to the abuses and injuries you have recieved in your own lifetime.
Motor fibres from the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of this system control involuntary striated muscle such as that in the heart, and involuntary smooth muscle such as that in the respiratory, digestive, cardiovascular, renal and reproductive systems.
The fibres of the parasympathetic system are found in some cranial nerves and in the sacral 2,3,4 spinal nerves.
www.geocities.com /CapeCanaveral/Launchpad/5172/nervous.html   (1371 words)

  
 System, autonomic nervous definition - Medical Dictionary definitions of popular medical terms
System, autonomic nervous: Part of the nervous system that was once thought to be functionally independent of the brain.
The autonomic nervous system has two divisions: (1) the sympathetic nervous system that accelerates the heart rate, constricts blood vessels, and raises blood pressure; and (2) the parasympathetic nervous system slows the heart rate, increases intestinal and gland activity, and relaxes sphincter muscles.
The autonomic system, together with the SA (sinoatrial) and AV (atrioventricular) nodes, is a major element in the cardiac conduction system, the system that controls the heart rate.
www.medterms.com /script/main/art.asp?articlekey=5690   (436 words)

  
 The Autonomic Nervous System (page 1)
The nervous system is divided into the somatic nervous system which controls organs under voluntary control (mainly muscles) and the Autonomic Nervous System (ANS) which regulates individual organ function and homeostasis, and for the most part is not subject to voluntary control.
The ANS is predominantly an efferent system transmitting impulses from the Central Nervous System (CNS) to peripheral organ systems.
The preganglionic outflow of the parasympathetic nervous system arises from the cell bodies of the motor nuclei of the cranial nerves III, VII, IX and X in the brain stem and from the second, third and fourth sacral segments of the spinal cord.
www.nda.ox.ac.uk /wfsa/html/u05/u05_010.htm   (879 words)

  
 Peripheral Nervous System, Nervous System, Autonomic Nervous System . . .
Peripheral Nervous System, Nervous System, Autonomic Nervous System.
The parasympathetic nervous calms the body, therefore it is referred to as the "wine and dine" nervous system.
The the autonomic nervous system (ANS) is under control of central nervous system and is also part of the peripheral nervous system, although these nerves stay within the body and effect organs and soft tissues and do not leave to effect appendages (arms and legs).
www.drstandley.com /bodysystems_peripheralnervous.shtml   (583 words)

  
 Ansar - Autonomic Nervous System Physiology
Thus, the parasympathetic causes slower heart rates and respiratory rates, sleep, increased gastrointestinal track motility, increased peripheral vascular flow, blood flow to all cells, liver and kidneys, and venous return to the heart.
Parasympathetic input to the heart is through fibers that synapse deep in the myocardium.
Since the parasympathetic is faster to respond, it is usually the branch that is first to indicate changes in health status anywhere in the body.
www.ans-hrv.com /ansphys.htm   (533 words)

  
 The Nervous System
The autonomic nervous system is divided into three parts: the sympathetic nervous system, the parasympathetic nervous system and the enteric nervous system.
The enteric nervous system is a third division of the autonomic nervous system that you do not hear much about.
The enteric nervous system is a meshwork of nerve fibers that innervate the viscera (gastrointestinal tract, pancreas, gall bladder).
www.healingtides.net /nervoussystem.htm   (823 words)

  
 Nervous System
The human nervous system is very complex, but basically it is like a telephone network, the main switchboard is the brain, with telephone cables (nerves) running from it down the spine connecting into every organ and system of the body.
The peripheral nervous system further divides into the autonomic nervous system which is the part we are particularly interested in with regard to stress, anxiety, depression and its related problems.
The body's organs and systems are supplied by nerves from the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems which can slow them down or speed them up via hormones and electrical impulses depending on the situation.
stresshelp.tripod.com /id15.html   (1368 words)

  
 Parasympathetic Nervous System   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
Also known as the 'cranio-sacral' nervous system, much of its activity is carried by those cranial nerves that are tied segmentally to the primitive branchial (gill) arch system.
The parasympathetic is a subdivision of the autonomic nervous system, and it operates in tandem with the other subdivision, the sympathetic nervous system.
Parasympathetic innervation of the iris constricts the pupillary opening, again shortening and clearing focus, as well as reducing the brightness of the image.
sky.bsd.uchicago.edu /lcy_ref/synap/parasympathetic.html   (1934 words)

  
 Introduction to Cardiovascular Pharmacology
The autonomic nervous system is widely distributed throughout the body and controls a variety of bodily functions, including blood pressure and heart rate.
The efferent peripheral autonomic nervous system is composed of two opposing subsystems, the sympathetic nervous system and the parasympathetic nervous system.
The postganglionic neurotransmitter of the parasympathetic nervous system is acetylcholine.
lysine.pharm.utah.edu /netpharm/netpharm_00/notes/introcv.htm   (1929 words)

  
 The SPD Network - The STAR Center
The purpose of this pilot study was to compare parasympathetic functions of children with sensory modulation disturbances (over or under responsiveness) and typical developing children.
The parasympathetic nervous system, part of the autonomic nervous system, helps individuals adapt to changing conditions.
The heart measures were evaluating the parasympathetic system and the sweat measures were evaluating the sympathetic system, both related to the autonomic nervous system.
www.spdnetwork.org /research/miller.para.html   (476 words)

  
 Autonomic Nervous System
Activation of the sympathetic nervous system results in an increase in all those contributing factors and, thus, increases blood pressure.
A sympatholytic agent, such as a adrenergic-blocker, would prevent the sympathetic nervous system from exerting its actions on the heart and blood pressure.In fact, it could result in a further fall in blood pressure.
In the case of the bladder the sympathetic division of the autonomic nervous system innervates the bladder wall (detrusor muscle) and exerts an inhibitory influence.
www.uh.edu /~szilagyi/Autonomic_Nervous_System.html   (597 words)

  
 The Peripheral Nervous System
The actions of the autonomic nervous system are largely involuntary (in contrast to those of the sensory-somatic system).
The preganglionic motor neurons of the sympathetic system arise in the spinal cord.
The main nerves of the parasympathetic system are the tenth cranial nerves, the vagus nerves.
home.comcast.net /~john.kimball1/BiologyPages/P/PNS.html   (904 words)

  
 The Autonomic Nervous System
The first set, called preganglionic neurons, originates in the brain stem or the spinal cord, and the second set, called ganglion cells or postganglionic neurons, lies outside the central nervous system in collections of nerve cells called autonomic ganglia.
The diagram to the left depicts this.) The axons of these neurons exit the spinal cord in the ventral roots and then synapse on either sympathetic ganglion cells or specialized cells in the adrenal gland called chromaffin cells.
This is characterized by the release of large quantities of epinephrine from the adrenal gland, an increase in heart rate, an increase in cardiac output, skeletal muscle vasodilation, cutaneous and gastrointestinal vasoconstriction, pupillary dilation, bronchial dilation, and piloerection.
www.becomehealthynow.com /article/bodynervousadvanced/822   (1644 words)

  
 Health Watch -- Gulf War Syndrome and the Nervous System
Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas found that damage to the parasympathetic nervous system may cause nearly half of the common symptoms usually associated with Gulf War syndrome.
Gulf War syndrome symptoms that could be related to the parasympathetic nervous system include gallbladder disease, unrefreshing sleep, depression, joint pain, chronic diarrhea and sexual dysfunction. Dr.
Parasympathetic brain action normally peaks during deep sleep, but didn't change in veterans with Gulf War syndrome, even though they appeared to be sleeping.
www.utsouthwestern.edu /utsw/cda/dept16498/files/191404.html   (334 words)

  
 Nervous System   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
Just like a telephone conversation, information in the nervous system is transmitted from one neuron to the other from the axon of the sending cell to dendrites of the receiving cell.
They are found in the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord) as well as the peripheral nervous system, which contains the cranial, spinal, and autonomic nerve trunks.
The autonomic system is in control of the areas that we don't consciously control; such as the respiratory, digestive, and urogenital systems.
www.vet.purdue.edu /vtdl/bms_116/nerve/nervous.htm   (1257 words)

  
 The Nervous System   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-06)
The peripheral nervous system is divided into two components-- skeletal and autonomic.
The skeletal nervous system controls voluntary movement while the autonomic nervous system usually operates on its own ("automatically").
Once the stress that has caused the sympathetic nervous system to activate has passed (such as anger or fear), the parasympathetic nervous system calms the body by decreasing heartbeat, lowering blood sugar, and so on.
www.acor.org /diseases/cns/nblastoma/sns.htm   (341 words)

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