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Topic: Pashto


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In the News (Sun 19 Nov 17)

  
  History of Pushto language
The variation in spelling of the language's name (Pashto, Pukhto, etc.) stems from the different pronunciations in the various dialects of the second consonant in the word; for example, it is a retroflex [sh] in the Kandahari dialect, and a palatal fricative in the Kabuli dialect.
In Afghanistan, Pashto is second in prestige to Dari, the Persian dialect spoken natively in the north and west.
Classical Pashto was the object of study by British soldiers and administrators in the nineteenth century and the classical grammar in use today dates from that period.
www.afghan-network.net /Ethnic-Groups/pashtu-history.html   (976 words)

  
 Pashto language Summary
Pashto speakers in Pakistan range from 16% to as much as 20% of the population (including Afghan refugees), but an accurate census remains elusive due to the tribal and migratory nature of Pashtuns and their habit of secluding women.
Pashto is spoken by about 12 million people in the south, east and a few northern provinces of Afghanistan and over 28 million in the Northwest Frontier Province, Federally Administered Tribal Areas, and Balochistan.
Pashto became one of the official languages of Afghanistan as late as 1936.
www.bookrags.com /Pashto_language   (1282 words)

  
 Pashto language - Information at Halfvalue.com
Pashto (پښتو‎, IPA: [pəʂto] also known as Pakhto, Pushto, Pukhto پختو‎, Pashtoe, Pashtu, Pushtu, Pushtoo, Pathan, or Afghan language) is an Iranian language of the Indo-Iranian language family spoken by Pashtuns living in western Pakistan and southeastern Afghanistan.
Pashto is spoken by about 28 million people in the western provinces of North-West Frontier Province, Federally Administered Tribal Areas, and Balochistan of Pakistan and by over 13 million people in the south, east, west and a few northern provinces of Afghanistan.
Pashto is an official and one of the national languages of Afghanistan as of 1936.
www.halfvalue.com /wiki.jsp?topic=Pashto_language   (1221 words)

  
 Pashto language, alphabet and pronunciation
Pashto is a member of the southeastern Iranian branch of Indo-Iranian languages and has about 25-30 million speakers.
Pashto was made the national language of Afghanistan by royal decree in 1936.
Pashto first appeared in writing during the 16th century in the form of an account of Shekh Mali's conquest of Swat.
www.omniglot.com /writing/pashto.htm   (176 words)

  
 Pashtu Corner
Pashto educational software - Dari / Pashto educational software for Afghan kids.
Books in Dari and Pashto for your kids and more.
Khyber.com - General Pashto information site with Islam, history, and entertainment sections.
www.afghana.com /SocietyAndCulture/PashtoCorner.htm   (288 words)

  
 Pashto
Pashto, also known as Afghan, Pushto, or Pashtu, is a member of the Iranian branch of the Indo-European language family.
For example, the second consonant in the name of the language, Pashto, is pronounced as a retroflex fricative [sh] in Kandahar, and as a palatal fricative in Kabul.
Pashto is a Category II language in terms of difficulty for speakers of English.
www.nvtc.gov /lotw/months/february/pashto.html   (1079 words)

  
 :.Mera Mardan.: Mardan Online!   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Pashto grammar shows wide usage of inflections, which can be either suffixed or interfixed (suffix inside the word), in verb conjugation and nominal declension.
Pashto literature exists from the 7th century, the first Pashto poem that has been documented was written in the 7th century by Amir Karoor (Le Ma Atal Nashta).
Earlier Pashto was not used in official documents and in social and political life, but nowadays the sphere of its use is widened all the time.
www.sitesled.com /members/meramardan/pashto.html   (368 words)

  
 The Khyber Gateway >> Types of Pashto Music
The Pashto music has very rich traditions though so far not written in notation locally, but by tradition it transfers from one generation to the other.
The same raga was first of all adopted for the composition of Pashto 'Tappa' an evergreen and most popular folk genre of the Pashto folk poetry.
Pashto Tappa is added according to the subject and circumstances.
www.khyber.org /culture/music/pashtomusic.shtml   (1881 words)

  
 Pashto.org - Da Pashto Network
Pashto dialects fall into two main divisions: the northern and central, which preserves the ancient kh (as in "Pakhto"), and the southern, which has the modern sh (as in "Pashto") sound.
Pashto speakers in Pakistan range from 19% to as much as 25% of the population (not including Afghan refugees), but an accurate census remains elusive due to the tribal and migratory nature of Pashtuns and their tradition of secluding women.
Pashto literature exists from the 7th century, the first Pashto poem that has been documented was written in the 7th century by Amir Karoor (Le Ma Atal Nashta).
www.pashto.org /content/view/14/62   (1287 words)

  
 Learn Pashto Language - Free Conversational Pashto Lessons Online - Common Pashto Words and Phrases   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The key is to immerse yourself in the language and use it as often as possible in order to build up your skills of speaking it and listening to it, understanding and comprehending it...
The Phrasebase website is the ultimate environment allowing you to read an Pashto Alphabet based phonetic spelling of common and useful everyday phrases in effort to memorize it and it's meaning.
Pashto Language Exchange Pen-Pals - Community of people from around the world interested in teaching you their language and sharing their culture with you.
www.phrasebase.com /learn/pashto.php   (1866 words)

  
 Foreign Language Opportunities   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Pashto is not always taught on a regular basis during the academic year, or through the fourth semester.
Pashto can be used to fulfill part of the language requirements of the International Studies major.
Elementary Pashto II * Pashto is offered during the summer at the Summer Workshop in Slavic, East European and Central Asian Languages (SWSEEL).
www.indiana.edu /~college/foreignlanguage/pashto/pashtoReqs.shtml   (88 words)

  
 Pashto Language - (CAIS)
Pashto is an Eastern Iranian language related to Persian Dari.
The earliest Pashto book is the history of the Yusefzai (1417), by Sheikh Mali, a Yusefzai chief.
In 1923 a literary group, Da Pashtu Maraka, was formed for this purpose, followed by the Pashto academy, which conducted research in Pashto literature and culture.
www.cais-soas.com /CAIS/languages/pashto.htm   (278 words)

  
 Pashto Language :: Khyber.ORG
Some of them are in their original Pashto, some translated into English, and some are in both English and Pashto.
Pashto literature is filled with examples of stories.
Featured here are a few of them in Pashto or their translated forms in English.
www.khyber.org /pashtolanguage.shtml   (199 words)

  
 Resources for the Study of Pashto Literature   (Site not responding. Last check: )
A summer reading course in Pashto classical and folk literature was taught by Dr. Wilma Heston; some texts and tapes of materials from this class are on this website.
Introductory Pashto will be offered at Indiana University in Summer, 2007, as part of a Workshop including nine other languages.
African Studies (http://www.soas.ac.uk) was not staffed to offer Pashto as part of a degree program.
lrrc3.sas.upenn.edu /heston/teaching/other.html   (288 words)

  
 Pashto
There are two major dialects of Pashto: Western Pashto spoken in Afghanistan and in the capital, Kabul, and Eastern Pashto spoken in northeastern Pakistan.
Two other dialects are also distinguished: Southern Pashto, spoken in Baluchistan (western Pakistan and eastern Iran) and in Kandahar, Afghanistan.
The variation in spelling of the language's name (Pashto, Pukhto, etc.) stems from the different pronunciations in the various dialects of the second consonant in the word; for example, it is a retroflex [sh] in the Kandahari dialect, and a palatal fricative in the Kabuli dialect.
www.angelfire.com /empire/afghan/pashto.html   (976 words)

  
 Blogit > Pashto under the British Empire   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Pashto under the British Empire II Interest in Pashto Pashto or the vernacular language of the majority Afghans, drew the attention of those in the services of East India Company as early as in the first half of the Nineteenth Century.
Amongst the first arrivals to learn Pashto were the European missionaries who came to spread the message of the Holy Bible in this part of the world.
Pashto under the British Empire IV General Review of the British Period Pashto renaissance was not confined to literature and in books.
www.blogit.com /Blogs/Blog.aspx/pashto   (520 words)

  
 Pashto Travel Phrases
Pashto is used in parts of Afghanistan and neighboring Pakistan.
This translation represents a dialect of Pashto used in the Nangarhar Province and many other parts of Eastern Afghanistan.
This translation represents a nomadic dialect of Pashto used in Qalat/Kalat (the capital of Zabul Province) and many other parts of Afghanistan.
www.travelphrases.info /languages/pashtoa.htm   (80 words)

  
 Multilingual Support for Windows | Asiasoft
Pashto Add-On to Windows 98, enable Microsoft Arabic Windows 98 and makes Microsoft Arabic Office 98 and Office 97 Pashto.
We have many Pashto True type fonts, which can be scaled to any size.
The Pashto keyboard can be selected from Keyboard icon on lower right corner of Windows or by pressing Right Alt + Right Shift keys.
www.liwal.com /windows/pashto/98.htm   (252 words)

  
 Farsi/Persian Computing Information (Penn State)
Pashto is in the same family as Persian (the Iranian languages), but are in separate branches and are therefore very distant.
Pashto is not widely supported, but Persian support may approximate Pashto in many cases.
There is a third-party Pashto keyboard is also available from Tolafghan (page in Pashto).
tlt.its.psu.edu /suggestions/international/bylanguage/pashto.html   (1293 words)

  
 Gazette | Feature: Understanding Pashto
When Grima Santry was first studying Pashto, it was such an obscure language for most Westerners that she had to resort to using a Russian-Pashto dictionary as her closest reference to a Western language.
Studying Pashto already required reference to other dictionaries—Persian, Arabic, and Urdu—in order to locate etymologically linked words used in Pashto but not found in a Pashto dictionary.
Yet Pashto is one of the major languages of Afghanistan and the major regional language of Pakistan’s North West Frontier Province (NWFP), and the 17 million who do speak it comprise one of the main ethnic groups in both those countries.
www.upenn.edu /gazette/0506/feature2_2.html   (1145 words)

  
 Pashto Keyboard Stickers
The Pashto keyboard stickers are printed on clear Lexan® so the original key legend shows through; this allows you to add Pashto stickers to your existing keyboard so that it becomes a bilingual keyboard (Pashto) and the original language of your keyboard).
The stickers are available in blue letters on clear stickers (for beige and light colored keyboards) and white letters on clear stickers (for dark colored keyboards).
Pashto stickers are a very economical option for creating a bilingual Pashto keyboard.
www.datacal.com /pashto-overlays.htm   (660 words)

  
 Pashto language and culture
Pashto language learning resources and links are collected here for Pashto language teachers and...
Pashto is a national language of Afghanistan spoken by over half of the people; it is the language of the Taliban, who now control two-thirds of Afghanistan and who have recently taken control of the capital city of Kabul.
The History of Pashto language Pushto is one of the national languages of Afghanistan (Dari Persian is the other).
www.lonweb.org /link-pashto.htm   (1141 words)

  
 Pashto World Test   (Site not responding. Last check: )
There is a fable in Pashto which goes somewhat like this: once upon a time the animals of the jungle...
George Chesnut, a spy who was Renaissance man, dies at 89Seattle Times, WA - Apr 29, 2007After work, on weekends and in retirement, Mr.
Chesnut translated children's poetry from Chinese to Spanish and English; compiled Serbian and Afghan Pashto...
www.iaswww.com /ODP/Test/World/Pashto   (313 words)

  
 Amazon.com: Your First 100 Words in Pashto: Books: Jane Wightwick   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Pashto Dictionary & Phrasebook: Pashto-English English-Pashto (Hippocrene Dictionary & Phrasebooks) by Nicholas Awde
The games/puzzles/connect-the-words pages are on the one hand quite stupid but on the other hand serve as the repetition necessary to commit the words to memory.
The editorial comment is wrong, Pashto is not spoken in Iran but is rather spoken in Afghanistan and parts of Pakistan.
www.amazon.com /Your-First-100-Words-Pashto/dp/0071412239   (1219 words)

  
 Ethnologue report for language code:pbu
Ethnic population: 49,529,000 possibly total Pashto in all countries.
Pashto clans are: Mohmandi, Ghilzai, Durani, Yusufzai, Afridi, Kandahari (Qandahari), Waziri, Chinwari (Shinwari), Mangal, Wenetsi.
"The impact of the "Khudai Khidmatgar" movement on Pashto literature."
www.ethnologue.com /show_language.asp?code=pbu   (212 words)

  
 Pashto definition - Dictionary - MSN Encarta
Search for "Pashto" in all of MSN Encarta
Pash·to (plural Pash·to or Pash·tos) or Push·to (plural Push·to or Push·tos) or Push·tu (plural Push·tu or Push·tus)
Pashto speaker: somebody who speaks Pashto as a native language
encarta.msn.com /dictionary_1861724036/Pashto.html   (103 words)

  
 Pashto Unicode Fonts
The Pashto language (also known as Pashtu) is used in parts of Afghanistan, Pakistan, and a handful of other countries.
Several letters specific to Pashto were added to the Persian script, which itself is an adaptation of Arabic script.
Afghanan.net has a tutorial on the Pashto alphabet (not Unicode related).
www.wazu.jp /gallery/Fonts_Pashto.html   (1501 words)

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