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Topic: Peerage Act 1963


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  House Of Lords Act 1999
It also removes the existing disqualifications of a hereditary peer, unless he is excepted under section 2 of the Act from the general exclusion from the House of Lords, to vote in elections to the House of Commons and to stand as a candidate for, or be a member of, the House of Commons.
Section 3 of the 1963 Act sets out the effects of disclaimer of a peerage, one of which is that a person is not disqualified from membership of, or voting in elections to, the House of Commons.
One of the effects of section 3(2) of the 1963 Act is to prohibit the issue of a writ in acceleration to the person entitled to succeed to a disclaimed hereditary peerage on the death of its present holder.
www.opsi.gov.uk /acts/en1999/1999en34.htm   (3010 words)

  
  Encyclopedia: Peerage   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
There are various parts to the Peerage which convey slightly different benefits: the Peerage of England pertains to all titles created by the Kings and Queens of England prior to the Act of Union in 1707.
The only remaining peerage with associated lands controlled by the holder is the Duchy of Cornwall, which is associated with the Dukedom of Cornwall, a dukedom held by the eldest son and heir to the Sovereign.
While life peerages were often created in the early days of the Peerage, their regular creation was not provided for under an Act of Parliament until 1876, with the passage of the Appellate Jurisdiction Act.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/peerage   (5048 words)

  
 Peerage Act 1963 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
The Peerage Act 1963 is a significant act in the history of the British Peerage.
To disclaim an hereditary peerage, the peer must deliver an instrument of disclaimer to the Lord Chancellor within twelve months of succeeding to the peerage, or within twelve months of passage of the Act, or, if under the age of twenty-one at the time of succession, within twelve months of becoming twenty-one years old.
Prior to the House of Lords Act 1999, an hereditary peer could not disclaim a peerage after having applied for a writ of summons to Parliament; now, however, hereditary peers do not have the automatic right to a writ of summons to the House.
www.kernersville.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Peerage_Act_1963   (952 words)

  
 The British Peerage:
Peerage is the dignity to which is attached the right of a summons by name to sit and vote in Parliament.(100) There are however some peers who are not lords of Parliament, and lords of Parliaments who are not peers- the lords spiritual.
While the Acts of Union were necessary to regulate the position of Scottish and Irish peers in relation to their English counterparts, this was because of the need to restrict membership of the House of Lords, a qualification which does not apply to New Zealand.
Peerages conferred by the British Sovereign are not, in the law of New Zealand, titles conferred by a foreign Sovereign.
www.geocities.com /noelcox/Peerage_Law.htm   (9421 words)

  
 Peerage
The Peerage of Ireland includes titles created for the Kingdom of Ireland before the Act of Union of 1801, and some titles created after that year, while the Peerage of Great Britain pertains to titles created for the Kingdom of Great Britain between 1707 and 1801.
Since the independence of the Republic of Ireland, the right of the Peerage of Ireland to elect representatives has ceased, although existing Irish peers in the House of Lords kept their seats until death.
A further important change occurred in 1999, when hereditary peers were stripped of their automatic right to sit in the Lords, with ninety-two peers—the holders of the ceremonial offices of Lord Great Chamberlain and Earl Marshal, along with ninety peers elected by other hereditaries—being retained temporarily until the completion of the reforms.
encyclopedia.codeboy.net /wikipedia/p/pe/peerage.html   (1947 words)

  
 Parliament And The Peerage   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
Under the Act of Settlement 1701, "No person born out of the Kingdoms of England, Scotland, or Ireland, or the dominions thereunto belonging except such as are born of English parents" may be a member of the House of Lords.
The Act establishing the Irish Free State was silent on the matter, though it did abolish the mechanism for such elections by abolishing the posts of Lord Chancellor of Ireland and Clerk of the Crown in Ireland.
In 1963, the Peerage Act permitted peers to disclaim hereditary dignities; Sir Alec Douglas-Home, 14th Earl of Home, availed himself of this right so as to be able to serve as Prime Minister from the House of Commons, rather than from the House of Lords.
www.wikiverse.org /parliament-and-the-peerage   (4167 words)

  
 Peerage Act 1963   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
The Peerage Act 1963 allows the holder of a British peerage to renounce his/her title for life within twelve months of the Act becoming law or of inheriting the peerage - or within one month of inheriting if a Member of the House of Commons.
The peerage itself thus becomes dormant during the lifetime of the person but is afterwards inherited as if it had not been renounced.
The Act resulted largely from the protests of one man, Labour MP Tony Benn.
www.ukpedia.com /p/peerage-act-1963.html   (193 words)

  
 Peerage Act 1963
(2) Where a peerage is disclaimed under this Act, no other hereditary peerage shall be conferred upon the person by whom it is disclaimed, [and no writ in acceleration shall be issued in respect of that peerage to the person entitled thereto on his death].
(3) The disclaimer of a peerage under this Act shall not affect any right, interest or power (whether arising before or after the disclaimer) of the person by whom the peerage is disclaimed, or of any other person, to, in or over any estates or other property limited or settled to devolve with that peerage.
The holder of a peerage in the peerage of Ireland shall not by virtue of that peerage be disqualified—
home.freeuk.com /don-aitken/peer63.htm   (725 words)

  
 Peerage of Scotland   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
With that year's Act of Union, the Kingdoms of Scotland and England were combined into the Kingdom of Great Britain, and a new Peerage of Great Britain was introduced in which subsequent titles would be granted.
The Peerage Act 1963 allowed all Scottish Peers to sit in the House of Lords, a right which was lost along with all other hereditary peers due to the passage of the House of Lords Act 1999.
The ranks of the Scottish Peerage are Duke, Marquess, Earl, Viscount, and Lord of Parliament.
www.worldhistory.com /wiki/P/Peerage-of-Scotland.htm   (399 words)

  
 Articles - Representative peer   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
Members of the Peerage of England, Peerage of Great Britain, and Peerage of the United Kingdom all had the right to sit in the House of Lords; they did not elect a limited group of representatives.
Under the Act of Union of 1707, the peers of Scotland were entitled to elect sixteen representative peers.
Firstly, it was noted that the Peerage Act 1963 explicitly repealed the portions of the Articles of Union relating to elections of representative peers, and that no parliamentary commentators had raised doubts as to the validity of those repeals.
www.masterize.com /articles/Parliament_and_the_Peerage   (1952 words)

  
 Peerage Act 1963
(2) Where a peerage is disclaimed under this Act, no other hereditary peerage shall be conferred upon the person by whom it is disclaimed, [and no writ in acceleration shall be issued in respect of that peerage to the person entitled thereto on his death].
(3) The disclaimer of a peerage under this Act shall not affect any right, interest or power (whether arising before or after the disclaimer) of the person by whom the peerage is disclaimed, or of any other person, to, in or over any estates or other property limited or settled to devolve with that peerage.
The holder of a peerage in the peerage of Ireland shall not by virtue of that peerage be disqualified—
home.freeuk.net /don-aitken/peer63.htm   (725 words)

  
 Talk:Peerage Act 1963 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
I believe so, however, because of the House of Lords Act 1999, the title would not allow him to take up a seat in the House of Lords.
A peerage must be disclaimed within 12 months of inheriting it, or within 12 months of the act beeing passed.
However "family" is not what it says in the Act ([2]).
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Talk:Peerage_Act_1963   (652 words)

  
 Peerage Act 1963 -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
The Peerage Act 1963 is a significant act in the history of the British (The peers of a kingdom considered as a group) Peerage.
Under British law at the time, peers (meeting certain qualifications, such as age) were automatically members of the (The upper house of the British parliament) House of Lords and could not sit in, or even vote in elections for, the other chamber, the (The lower house of the British parliament) House of Commons.
The timing of the Act had a significant influence on British politics, with the resignation of (Click link for more info and facts about Harold Macmillan) Harold Macmillan as (The person who holds the position of head of state in England) Prime Minister in 1963.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/P/Pe/Peerage_Act_1963.htm   (1312 words)

  
 House of Lords Act 1999
Accordingly, any writ of summons issued for the present Parliament in right of a hereditary peerage shall not have effect after that Session unless it has been issued to a person who, at the end of the Session, is excepted from section 1 by virtue of section 2.
In section 1(2) of the Peerage Act 1963 (disclaimer of certain hereditary peerages) for the words from "has" to the end there shall be substituted the words "is excepted from section 1 of the House of Lords Act 1999 by virtue of section 2 of that Act".
In Schedule 1 to that Act (certificate of vacancy), for the words "has become a peer of Parliament" there shall be substituted the words "has become disqualified as a peer for membership of the House of Commons".
www.hereditarytitles.com /Page39.html   (774 words)

  
 House of Lords Act 1999
Acts of Parliament printed from this website are printed under the superintendence and authority of the Controller of HMSO being the Queen's Printer of Acts of Parliament.
It should be noted that the right to reproduce the text of Acts of Parliament does not extend to the Queen's Printer imprints which should be removed from any copies of the Act which are issued or made available to the public.
An Act to restrict membership of the House of Lords by virtue of a hereditary peerage; to make related provision about disqualifications for voting at elections to, and for membership of, the House of Commons; and for connected purposes.
www.hmso.gov.uk /acts/acts1999/19990034.htm   (1080 words)

  
 Peerage
Hereditary peers are those individuals whose peerage dignities may be inherited.
Historically, peers were entitled to seats in the House of Lords subject only to qualifications such as age and citizenship.
Conflicts over succession to peerage dignities are resolved by the Sovereign, the ultimate source of honour in the United Kingdom.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/p/pe/peerage.html   (1893 words)

  
 Peerage - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Sovereign him or herself cannot belong to the Peerage as "the fountain and source of all dignities cannot hold a dignity from himself" (opinion of the House of Lords in the Buckhurst Peerage Case).
For instance, the title Marquess Douro is based on the River Douro in Portugal, over which the British monarch has neither sovereignty nor suzerainty.
At most, there may be twelve Lords of Appeal in Ordinary under the age of seventy-five at one time.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Peerage   (2387 words)

  
 Peerage of Scotland   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
With that year's Act of Union, the Kingdoms of Scotland and England were combined into the Kingdom of Great Britain, and a new Peerage of Great Britain was introduced.
The Peerage Act 1963 allowed all Scottish Peers to sit in the House of Lords, a right which was lost alongwith all other hereditary peers due to the passage of the House of Lords Act 1999.
Duke of Abercorn in the Peerage of Ireland;
www.therfcc.org /peerage-of-scotland-88202.html   (857 words)

  
 Rights and Privileges of Peers
An English peer (before 1963, unless she is a woman) sits in the upper house of Parliament -- the House of Lords.
Scottish peers created since the Act of Union in 1707 are peers of the United Kingdom, and are equivalent in all respects to peers of England created subsequent to 1707 (who are also, technically, peers of the United Kingdom), including a right to a seat in the House of Lords.
Therefore, the number of Scottish peerages to which this restriction applies was rather small; most of them were created between James I's accession in 1603 and the Act of Union in 1707.
laura.chinet.com /html/titles06.html   (775 words)

  
 Verfassung des Vereinigten Königreichs Großbritannien und Nordirland (Peerages Act 1963)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
(3) The disclaimer of a peerage under this Act shall not affect any right, interest or power (whether arising before or after the disclaimer) of the person by whom the peerage is disclaimed, or of any other person, to, in or over any estates or other property limited or settled ta devolve with that peerage.
This Act may be cited as the Peerage Act 1963.
Da eine britische Verfassungskonvention bestimmte, daß der Premieminister Mitglied des House of Commons sein mußte (seit dem Präzedenzfall der Ernennung Stanley Baldwins 1923; zuvor war die Mitgliedschaft in einem der Häuser des Parlaments erforderlich), mußte der Primeminister sich als Mitglied des House of Commons wählen lassen und somit zuvor aus dem House of Lords ausscheiden.
homepages.compuserve.de /verfassungen/verf/gb1963.htm   (902 words)

  
 Parlianet - UK Parliament
Its power was once equal to that of the Commons but this was limited to delaying Money Bills for 30 days by the Parliament Act 1911 and other bills for two years; in 1948 reduced to one year by the Parliament Act 1949.
The Peerage Act of 1963 made it possible for hereditary peers to resign their peerages and obtain the status and rights of commoners.
Since the passage of the House of Lords Act 1999, a number of attempts has been made to break the logjam in reforming the House of Lords.
www.parlianet.com /addservices/ukparliament.asp   (928 words)

  
 House of Lords - - Report   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
By virtue of an amendment made by the British Nationality Act 1981,[6] this provision does not apply to Commonwealth citizens or citizens of the Republic of Ireland.
The Forfeiture Act 1870 provides that anyone convicted of treason shall be disqualified for sitting or voting as a Member of the House of Lords until he has either suffered his term of imprisonment or received a pardon;
Under the Insolvency Act 1986,[8] a Member of the House adjudged bankrupt, or in Scotland a Member of the House whose estate is sequestered, is disqualified for sitting and voting in the House of Lords or in any committee of the House.
www.publications.parliament.uk /pa/ld/ldcomp/compso03.htm   (3033 words)

  
 Peerage Act 1963   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-19)
A peer who disclaims the peerage and his wife lose all titles, rights and privileges associated with the peerage.
The Act granted Peers of Scotland the same right to sit in the House of Lords as Peers of England, Great Britain or the United Kingdom, thereby ending the election of representative peerss.
An amendment that would have allowed Irish peers to sit in the House as well was defeated ninety to eight.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/peerage_act_1963   (885 words)

  
 UK Parliament - Key legislation affecting the House of Lords
The general rule is that all Bills have to be passed by both the House of Commons and the House of Lords except in certain circumstances.
The Peerage Act 1963 allowed hereditary peeresses to be members of the Lords, hereditary peerages to be disclaimed for life and for all Scottish Peers to sit.
The Constitutional Reform Act 2005 received Royal Assent in March 2005 and provides for the separating of the judiciary (legal system) from the legislature (Parliament) and the executive (Government).
www.parliament.uk /faq/lords_legislation.cfm   (561 words)

  
 Gesetz ├╝ber den Adel (Peerages Act 1963)
2 wurden die Worte "has applied for a writ of summon to attend the House of Lords in right of that peerage" ersetzt durch: "is excepted from section 1 of the House of Lords Act 1999 by virtue of section 2 of that Act".
(3) The disclaimer of a peerage under this Act shall not affect any right, interest or power (whether arising before or after the disclaimer) of the person by whom the peerage is disclaimed, or of any other person, to, in or over any estates or other property limited or settled ta devolve with that peerage.
This Act may be cited as the Peerage Act 1963.
www.verfassungen.de /gb/gb1963.htm   (983 words)

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