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Topic: Peerage of England


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  Peerage of England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Peerage of England Dukes in the Peerage of England
Peerage of England Earls in the Peerage of England
Duke of BuccleuchDuke of Buccleuch and Queensberry/ in the Peerage of Scotland
www.infothis.com /find/Peerage_of_England   (771 words)

  
 Peerage - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
There are various parts to the Peerage which convey slightly different benefits: the Peerage of England pertains to all titles created by the Kings and Queens of England prior to the Act of Union in 1707.
The only remaining peerage with associated lands controlled by the holder is the Duchy of Cornwall, which is associated with the Dukedom of Cornwall, a dukedom held by the eldest son and heir to the Sovereign.
While life peerages were often created in the early days of the Peerage, their regular creation was not provided for under an Act of Parliament until 1876, with the passage of the Appellate Jurisdiction Act.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Peerage   (2387 words)

  
 PEERAGE - LoveToKnow Article on PEERAGE   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The change in England was gradual, and probably gathered force as the gulf between the greater barons and the lesser widened, until in course of time, for judicial purposes, there came to be only two classes, the greater barons and the rest of the people.
The Church in England, as in Christendom generally, occupied a position of paramount importance and far-reaching influence; its leaders, not alone from their special sanctity as ecclesiastics, but as practically the only educated men of the period, of necessity were among the chief advisers of every ruler in Western Europe.
The conclusion, then, may be drawn that in theory the issue of a writ was at the pleasure of the Crown, and that in practice the moving factor in the case of the prelates was office and personal importance, and in the case of abbots and barons probably, in the main, extent of possession.
7.1911encyclopedia.org /P/PE/PEERAGE.htm   (14716 words)

  
 Edward I of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
He reigned from 1272 to 1307, ascending the throne of England on November 21, 1272 after the death of his father, King Henry III of England.
His second marriage was to Marguerite of France (known as the "Pearl of France" by her English subjects), the daughter of King Philippe III of France (Phillip the Bold) and Maria of Brabant, produced three children.
Wales became incorporated into England under the Statute of Rhuddlan in 1284 and in 1301 Edward created his eldest son Edward Prince of Wales, since which time the eldest son of each English monarch has borne the same title.
www.newlenox.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Edward_I_of_England   (1109 words)

  
 Charles II of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Charles, the eldest surviving son of Charles I of England and Henrietta Maria of France, was born in St.
The Protectorate of England was abolished, and the Commonwealth of England established.
Charles set out for England, arriving in Dover on 23 May 1660 and reaching London on 29 May (which is considered the date of the Restoration, and was Charles' thirtieth birthday).
www.lighthousepoint.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Charles_II_of_England   (3157 words)

  
 Henry VI of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
During Henry's minority, England was ruled by a regency government which came to be dominated by Humphrey, Duke of Gloucester, Henry IV's youngest son, and Bishop Henry Beaufort (Cardinal Beaufort from 1426) who was Henry V's half-uncle.
The former died in 1435; the latter was disgraced, accused of treason and probably murdered in 1447.
While Henry VI was still a child, and England was ruled by a regency government, much of the ground his father gained was lost.
www.peekskill.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Henry_VI_of_England   (2375 words)

  
 Edward IV of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Edward IV (April 28, 1442 – April 9, 1483) was King of England from March 4, 1461 to April 9, 1483, with a break of a few months in the period 1470-1471.
Edward was born on April 28, 1442, at Rouen in France, the eldest son of Richard, Duke of York (a leading claimant to the throne of England) and Cecily Neville.
When he returned to England his original claim, just as Henry Bolingbroke's had been, was that he merely desired his dukedom.
www.kernersville.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Edward_IV_of_England   (2098 words)

  
 John of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
In 1213, he made England a papal fief to resolve a conflict with the Church, and his rebellious barons forced him to sign Magna Carta in 1215, the act for which he is best remembered.
Born at Oxford, John was the fifth son of King Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine.
His nine-year-old son succeeded him and became King Henry III of England, and although Louis continued to claim the English throne, the barons switched their allegiance to the new king, forcing Louis to give up his claim and sign the Treaty of Lambeth in 1217.
www.newlenox.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/John_of_England   (2246 words)

  
 Henry V of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Henry V, (August 9 or September 16, 1387 – August 31, 1422), King of England, son of Henry IV by Mary de Bohun, was born at Monmouth, Wales, in September 1387.
At the time of his birth during the reign of Richard II Henry was fairly far removed from the throne, preceded by the King and another preceding collateral line of heirs.
The late king Richard II of England was honourably reinterred; the young Mortimer was taken into favour; the heirs of those who had suffered in the last reign were restored gradually to their titles and estates.
www.secaucus.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Henry_V_of_England   (1713 words)

  
 James II of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
James VII and II (14 October 1633–16 September 1701) became King of England, Scotland, and Ireland from 6 February 1685.
In 1660, with Oliver Cromwell dead, Charles II was restored to the English Throne, the Duke of York returning to England with him.
In England, attempts were made by Lord Shaftesbury and others to exclude the Duke of York from the line of succession.
www.eastcleveland.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/James_II_of_England   (2548 words)

  
 Henry VIII of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Notable events during his reign included the break with Rome and the subsequent establishment of the independent Church of England, the Dissolution of the Monasteries, and the union of England and Wales.
Henry VII was still eager to maintain the marital alliance between England and Spain through a marriage between Henry, Prince of Wales and Catherine.
The Act of Supremacy 1534 declared that the King was "the only Supreme Head in Earth of the Church of England"; the Treasons Act 1534 made it high treason, punishable by death, to refuse to acknowledge the King as such.
www.hackettstown.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Henry_VIII_of_England   (5110 words)

  
 Henry IV of England - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
His father, John of Gaunt was the third and oldest surviving son of King Edward III of England, and enjoyed a position of considerable influence during much of the reign of Richard II.
Henry, however, had a rather more equivocal relationship with Richard: they were first cousins and childhood playmates, and were admitted together to the Order of the Garter in 1377, but Henry participated in the Lords Appellant’s rebellion against the King in 1387.
The king's success in putting down these rebellions was due partly to the military ability of his eldest son, Henry, who would later become King Henry V of England, though the younger Henry himself (who had maintained a close relationship with Richard II) managed to seize much effective power from his father in 1410.
www.americancanyon.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Henry_IV_of_England   (941 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The first marquess in England was Robert de Vere, 9th Earl of Oxford, who was created Marquess of Dublin by Richard II on the 1 December 1385.
Marchioness of Pembroke, Henry VIII of England, 1532
The Chronological Peerage of England, hereditarytitles.com as of March 2, 2003; [1]; omits Normanby, misspells Hartington as Martington, places Marquess of Lorn and Kintyre in peerage of England (Scotland is more probable).
www.online-encyclopedia.info /encyclopedia/m/ma/marquess.html   (346 words)

  
 GLOSSARY - BURKE'S GUIDE TO BRITISH TITLES   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The term peerage derives from the Latin word for equal (par) and to the extent that all peers with seats in the House have tended to be summoned to it irrespective of their relative rank, importance or wealth, the term still has some relevance.
The institution of a peerage (2) as a body of notional equals, sometimes even the equal of the King in the extent of land they held, existed in mainland Europe long before the development of the House of Lords offshore.
From 1603 to 1707 sovereigns of England and sovereigns of Scotland were the same person, though the kingdoms themselves were still separate, and continued to create titles in the peerages of both kingdoms.
www.burkes-peerage.net /sites/peerage/sitepages/page66-peerage.asp   (743 words)

  
 England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Governor of New York 1674-1681, 1688, of New England 1686-1691, of Virginia 1692-1698, and of Maryland 1693-1694.
Hereafter the title was always associated with the direct heir to the throne of England and then Great Britain, and merges with the Dukedom of Cornwall, the Earldom of Carrick, the Hereditary Great Stewardship of Scotland, and the Lordship of the Isles as a subsidiary title of the Prince of Wales.
England emerges throughout the 9th century CE, as the Kingdom of Wessex became the pre-eminent Anglo-Saxon nation and, with the containment of the Scandinavian Kingdom of York by the end of the century, the only surviving English nation.
www.hostkingdom.net /engl.html   (4093 words)

  
 How the Peerage is Ranked
The highest rank in the Peerage was introduced into England in 1337 when King Edward III created his eldest son Duke of Comwall.
The second rank in the Peerage is derived from the Gernlan Markgraf, signifying the guardian of a March, or border territory.
The fourth rank in the Peerage is derived from the hereditary office of Vice-Comes, that is, the deputy of a Count.
www.electricscotland.com /webclans/peerage.htm   (510 words)

  
 Peerage and Nobility of the Royal Houses - English & Scottish Nobility & Peerage
This coronet was assigned by Royal Warrant, by Charles II, to barons of England, and later by James II, to Barons of Ireland.
The order of precedency to be observed in England was settled by an Act of Parliament passed in the thirty-first year of the reign of Henry VIII.
The Archbishop of Canterbury, Lord Primate of All England.
www.scotlandroyalty.org /peerage.html   (2821 words)

  
 Peerage - Pictures   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The Peerage of Ireland includes titles created for the Kingdom of Ireland before the Act of Union of 1801, and some titles created after that year, while the Peerage of Great Britain pertains to titles created for the Kingdom of Great Britain between 1707 and 1801.
Peers of England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom were automatically members of the House of Lords, subject only to age and citizenship qualifications.
A further important change occurred in 1999, when hereditary peers were stripped of their automatic right to sit in the Lords, with ninety-two peers—the holders of the ceremonial offices of Lord Great Chamberlain and Earl Marshal, along with ninety peers elected by other hereditaries—being retained temporarily until the completion of the reforms.
greatestinfo.org /Peerage   (1908 words)

  
 Peerage   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
There are various parts to the Peerage which convey slightly different benefits: the Peerage of England pertains to all titles created by the Kings and Queens of England prior to the Act of Union 1707Act of Union in 1707.
The Peerage of Ireland includes titles created for the Kingdom of Ireland before the Act of Union 1800Act of Union of 1801, and some titles created after that year, whilst the Peerage of Great Britain pertains to titles created for the Kingdom of Great Britain between 1707 and 1801.
The only remaining peerage with associated lands controlled by the holder is the Duke of CornwallDuchy of Cornwall/, which is associated with the Dukedom of Cornwall, a dukedom held by the eldest son and heir to the Sovereign.
www.infothis.com /find/Peerage   (2569 words)

  
 Peerage   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The titles within the peerage are, in ascending order of rank, baron (baroness[?] for women), viscount (viscountess[?]), earl (countess[?]), marquess (marchioness[?]), and duke.
There are several distinct groupings of peerages within Britain: the peerage of England pertains to all titles created by the Kings and Queens of England prior to the Act of Union in 1707.
Not all British titles are peerage titles: knights and baronets are not by virtue of those titles peers, nor are princes or princesses (unless they have also been granted a peerage title, as royal princes usually are).
www.city-search.org /pe/peerage.html   (1118 words)

  
 British Titles of Nobility
The English Peerage, or, a View of the Ancient and Present State of the English Nobility.
The Present Peerage of the United Kingdom for the Year 1818, with the Arms of the Peers.
This she will not do until there is no question regarding the inheritance of the peerage and the peer is of age.
www.chinet.com /~laura/html/titles01.html   (1122 words)

  
 Debrett's - The Peerage: Dukes, Marquesses, Earls, Viscounts, Barons (and Life Peers)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
William the Conqueror was Duke of Normandy) it was not adopted as a peerage title until 1337, when Edward III conferred the Dukedom of Cornwall on his eldest son, the Black Prince.
It was introduced to England by Richard II, brother-in-law of the Margrave of Brandenburg, the honour being conferred upon Robert de Vere, Earl of Oxford, who became Marquess of Dublin in 1385.
Prior to the passing of the Life Peerages Act of 1958 the only life peers were the Lords of Appeal in Ordinary who had been appointed to non-hereditary peerages, since 1876, to carry out the judicial duties of the House of Lords.
www.debretts.co.uk /peerage_and_baronetage/peers.html   (1058 words)

  
 Duke of Clarence   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Duke of Clarence is a title which has been traditionally awarded to junior members of the English and British royal families.
The first three creations were in the Peerage of England, the fourth in the Peerage of Great Britain, and the fifth in the Peerage of the United Kingdom.
The last creation in the Peerage of England was for George Plantagenet, brother of King Edward IV.
www.1-free-software.com /en/wikipedia/d/du/duke_of_clarence.html   (267 words)

  
 HEREDITARY PEERAGES IN THE PEERAGE OF ENGLAND BELOW THE RANK OF A MARQUESS
VISCOUNTCIES IN THE PEERAGE OF 1 Viscountcy of Beauchamp of Hache 5 June 1536(The Viscountcy is forfeited and should be held by the Duke of Somerset).
BARONIES IN THE PEERAGE OF 1 Barony of De Ros 14 December 1264.
Among the other peerages two English peerages is held by one Scottish Duke,one English Barony is held by one Irish Earl,18 English peerages are being held by 11 GB peers and 17 English peerages are being held by 11 UK peers.
www.hulthenhem.se /peer/eng.htm   (2707 words)

  
 Articles - Earl of March   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The title derived from the "marches" or boundaries between England and either Wales or Scotland, and was held by several great feudal families which owned lands in those border districts.
He forfeit his title, which was in the Peerage of England, for treason in 1330, but his descendant Roger managed to have it restored eighteen years later.
In the Peerage of England, the next creation of the earldom came when Edward Plantagenet, Duke of Cornwall was made Earl of March in 1479.
www.lastring.com /articles/Earl_of_March?mySession=1293d04a59a9428b8ddc396ad437e30b   (798 words)

  
 Peerage Act 1963
(2) Where a peerage is disclaimed under this Act, no other hereditary peerage shall be conferred upon the person by whom it is disclaimed, [and no writ in acceleration shall be issued in respect of that peerage to the person entitled thereto on his death].
(3) The disclaimer of a peerage under this Act shall not affect any right, interest or power (whether arising before or after the disclaimer) of the person by whom the peerage is disclaimed, or of any other person, to, in or over any estates or other property limited or settled to devolve with that peerage.
The holder of a peerage in the peerage of Ireland shall not by virtue of that peerage be disqualified—
home.freeuk.net /don-aitken/peer63.htm   (725 words)

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