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Topic: Peerage of Great Britain


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In the News (Fri 24 May 19)

  
  Peerage - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Peerage of Ireland includes titles created for the Kingdom of Ireland before the Act of Union of 1801, and some titles created after that year, whilst the Peerage of Great Britain pertains to titles created for the Kingdom of Great Britain between 1707 and 1801.
The only remaining peerage with associated lands controlled by the holder is the Duchy of Cornwall, which is associated with the Dukedom of Cornwall, a dukedom held by the eldest son and heir to the Sovereign.
While life peerages were often created in the early days of the Peerage, their regular creation was not provided for under an Act of Parliament until 1876, with the passage of the Appellate Jurisdiction Act.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Peerage   (2387 words)

  
 PEERAGE - LoveToKnow Article on PEERAGE   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The conclusion, then, may be drawn that in theory the issue of a writ was at the pleasure of the Crown, and that in practice the moving factor in the case of the prelates was office and personal importance, and in the case of abbots and barons probably, in the main, extent of possession.
The great bulk of the Irish peerage ewes its existence to creations during the last two centuries, only seven of the existing peerages dating back beyond the 17th century; of the rest twenty-two were created during the year of Union, and thirty-three have been added since that date.
The grant of a peerage is a very different matter; its holder becomes thereby a member of the Upper House of Parliament, and therefore, the prerogative of the Crown in creating such an office of honor must be exercised strictly in accordance with the law of the land.
7.1911encyclopedia.org /P/PE/PEERAGE.htm   (14716 words)

  
 Robert Walpole - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Earls in the Peerage of Great Britain
Great Britain, free from Jacobite threats, from war, and from financial crises, grew prosperous, and Robert Walpole acquired the favour of George I. In 1725, he was created a Knight of the Bath, and in 1726, a Knight of the Garter (earning him the nickname "Sir Blustering").
Under the Treaty of Seville (1729), Great Britain agreed not to trade with the Spanish colonies in North America; Spain claimed the right to board and search British vessels to ensure compliance.
www.peekskill.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Robert_Walpole   (3663 words)

  
 George III of the United Kingdom - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
George III (George William Frederick) (4 June 1738 – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain, and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until 1 January 1801, and thereafter King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death.
France subsequently declared war on Great Britain in 1793, and George III became the symbol of British resistance.
In Great Britain, George III used the official style "George the Third, by the Grace of God, King of Great Britain, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, etc." In 1801, when Great Britain united with Ireland, George III took the opportunity to drop his claim to the French Throne.
www.hackettstown.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/George_III   (4126 words)

  
 William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
After some weeks' negotiation, in the course of which the firmness and moderation of "the Great Commoner," as he had come to be called, contrasted favourably with the characteristic tortuosities of the crafty peer, matters were settled on such a basis that, while Newcastle was the nominal, Pitt was the virtual head of the government.
By the acceptance of a peerage the great commoner lost at least as much and as suddenly in popularity as he gained in dignity.
The commercial prosperity that was produced by his war policy was in a great part delusive, as prosperity so produced must always be, though it had permanent effects of the highest moment in the rise of such centres of industry as Glasgow.
www.marylandheights.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/William_Pitt,_1st_Earl_of_Chatham   (5338 words)

  
 Peerage of England   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Duke of Manchester in the Peerage of Great Britain
Duke of BuccleuchDuke of Buccleuch and Queensberry/ in the Peerage of Scotland
Earl of Guilford/ in the Peerage of Great Britain
www.infothis.com /find/Peerage_of_England   (771 words)

  
 William Pulteney, 1st Earl of Bath - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
From the day of his dismissal to that of his ultimate triumph Pulteney remained in opposition, and, although Walpole attempted in 1730 to conciliate him by the offer of Townshend's place and of a peerage, all his overtures were spurned.
Bolingbroke withdrew to France on the suggestion, it is said, of Pulteney, and the opposition was weakened by the dissensions of the leaders.
From the general election of 1734 until his elevation to the peerage Pulteney, sat for Middlesex.
www.lexington-fayette.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/William_Pulteney,_1st_Earl_of_Bath   (1116 words)

  
 William IV of the United Kingdom - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The inconsistencies in the system were great; for example, large towns such as Manchester and Birmingham elected no members, whilst minuscule boroughs such as Old Sarum (with seven voters) elected two members of Parliament each.
Because of his removal to the Upper House, he was forced to relinquish the posts of Leader of the House of Commons and Chancellor of the Exchequer—traditionally, a member of the House of Lords could hold neither post.
William's official style whilst King was, "William the Fourth, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland King, Defender of the Faith".
www.lighthousepoint.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/William_IV_of_the_United_Kingdom   (2243 words)

  
 Richard Howe, 1st Earl Howe - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
In 1762 he was elected M.P. for Dartmouth, and held the seat till he received a title of Great Britain.
He considered that he had not been properly supported in America, and was embittered both by the supersession of himself and his brother as peace commissioners, and by attacks made on him by the ministerial writers in the press.
In 1797 he was called on to pacify the mutineers at Spithead, and his great influence with the seamen who trusted him was conspicuously shown.
www.butte-silverbow.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Richard_Howe   (1252 words)

  
 Thomas Robinson, 2nd Baron Grantham - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Barons in the Peerage of Great Britain
In 1771 he was sent as ambassador to Madrid and retained this post until war broke out between Great Britain and Spain in 1779.
From 1780 to 1782 Grantham was President of the Board of Trade, and from July 1782 to April 1783 Foreign Secretary under Lord Shelburne.
www.leessummit.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Thomas_Robinson,_2nd_Baron_Grantham   (222 words)

  
 How the Peerage is Ranked
The highest rank in the Peerage was introduced into England in 1337 when King Edward III created his eldest son Duke of Comwall.
The second rank in the Peerage is derived from the Gernlan Markgraf, signifying the guardian of a March, or border territory.
The fourth rank in the Peerage is derived from the hereditary office of Vice-Comes, that is, the deputy of a Count.
www.electricscotland.com /webclans/peerage.htm   (510 words)

  
 Peerage   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
There are various parts to the Peerage which convey slightly different benefits: the Peerage of England pertains to all titles created by the Kings and Queens of England prior to the Act of Union 1707Act of Union in 1707.
The Peerage of Ireland includes titles created for the Kingdom of Ireland before the Act of Union 1800Act of Union of 1801, and some titles created after that year, whilst the Peerage of Great Britain pertains to titles created for the Kingdom of Great Britain between 1707 and 1801.
The only remaining peerage with associated lands controlled by the holder is the Duke of CornwallDuchy of Cornwall/, which is associated with the Dukedom of Cornwall, a dukedom held by the eldest son and heir to the Sovereign.
www.infothis.com /find/Peerage   (2569 words)

  
 JAG - The Peerage
Scotland may be said to have a peerage of similar antiquity, for that body known as the "Seven Earls" was as powerful as the continental peerages, pre-dated all but that of Charlemagne, and its descendants retained great influence until comparatively modern times.
New appointments to the English and Scottish Peerages ended with the Union of the two countries in 1707 and the formation of the Peerage of Great Britain.
In contrast, new appointments to the Peerage of Ireland did not end similarly in 1801, when Ireland joined Great Britain in the United Kingdom and the Peerage of the United Kingdom was created, for it was agreed that the number of Irish peers could be maintained at 100 by new creations.
www.baronage.co.uk /jag-ht/jag004.html   (530 words)

  
 Peerage   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
There are several distinct groupings of peerages within Britain: the peerage of England pertains to all titles created by the Kings and Queens of England prior to the Act of Union in 1707.
The Peerage of Ireland includes titles created for the Kingdom of Ireland before 1801, while the peerage of Great Britain pertains to titles created for the Kingdom of Great Britain between 1707 and 1801.
Not all British titles are peerage titles: knights and baronets are not by virtue of those titles peers, nor are princes or princesses (unless they have also been granted a peerage title, as royal princes usually are).
www.city-search.org /pe/peerage.html   (1118 words)

  
 Peerage - Pictures   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
The Peerage of Ireland includes titles created for the Kingdom of Ireland before the Act of Union of 1801, and some titles created after that year, while the Peerage of Great Britain pertains to titles created for the Kingdom of Great Britain between 1707 and 1801.
Peers of England, Great Britain and the United Kingdom were automatically members of the House of Lords, subject only to age and citizenship qualifications.
A further important change occurred in 1999, when hereditary peers were stripped of their automatic right to sit in the Lords, with ninety-two peers—the holders of the ceremonial offices of Lord Great Chamberlain and Earl Marshal, along with ninety peers elected by other hereditaries—being retained temporarily until the completion of the reforms.
greatestinfo.org /Peerage   (1908 words)

  
 HOOD, JOHN BELL - LoveToKnow Article on HOOD, JOHN BELL   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
But he seems to have studied too much in dark rooms, where the subtleties of flesh color are lost in the dusky smoothness and uniform redness of tints procurable from farthing dips.
He remained with the Army of Tennessee as a corps commander, and when the general dissatisfaction with the Fabian policy of General J. Johnston brought about the removal of that officer, Hood was put in his place with the temporary rank of general.
He had won a great reputation as a fighting geheral, and it was with the distinct understanding that battles were to be fought that he was placed at the head of the Army of Tennessee.
97.1911encyclopedia.org /H/HO/HOOD_JOHN_BELL.htm   (2851 words)

  
 Earls of Galloway
The former is in the Peerage of Scotland, and the latter in the Peerage of Great Britain.
Sir Alexander Stewart was elevated to the peerage, July 19, 1607, by the title of Baron of Garlies, and on September 19, 1623, was advanced to the Earl of Galloway.
Because of his great wealth, he did this with comparative impunity, and did not forfeit his association with his wife's family, one of whose relations he was supporting in the election.
www.kentuckystewarts.com /Galloway/EarlsofGalloway1.htm   (5629 words)

  
 Henry Petty-FitzMaurice, 5th Marquess of Lansdowne - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Henry Charles Keith Petty-FitzMaurice, 5th Marquess of Lansdowne, KG, GCSI, GCMG, GCIE (14 January 1845 – 3 June 1927) was a British politician and Irish peer who served as Governor General of Canada, Viceroy of India, Secretary of State for War, and Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs.
The great grandson of the British Prime Minister Lord Shelburne (later 1st Marquess of Lansdowne), and the eldest son of the, Henry Charles Keith Petty-Fitzmaurice was born in London.
After studying at Eton and Oxford, he succeeded his father as 5th Marquess of Lansdowne (in the Peerage of the United Kingdom) and 6th Earl of Kerry (in the Peerage of Ireland) at the relatively young age of 21 on 5 June 1866.
www.hartselle.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Henry_Petty-Fitzmaurice,_5th_Marquess_of_Lansdowne   (1129 words)

  
 William Petty, 2nd Earl of Shelburne - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Being thus brought into near communication with Lord Bute, he was in 1761 employed by that nobleman to negotiate for the support of Lord Holland.
He was returned to the House of Commons as member for Wycombe, but in 1761 he succeeded his father as Earl of Shelburne in the Irish peerage, and Baron Wycombe in the peerage of Great Britain (created 1760).
Though he declined to take office under Bute he undertook negotiations to induce Charles James Fox to gain the consent of the Commons to the peace of 1763.
www.kernersville.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/William_Petty,_2nd_Earl_of_Shelburne   (834 words)

  
 Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Salisbury's expertise was in foreign affairs, and uncharacteristically, for most of his time as Prime Minister he served not as First Lord of the Treasury, the traditional position held by the Prime Minister, but as Foreign Secretary.
Among the important events of his premierships was the Partition of Africa, culminating in the Fashoda Crisis and the Boer War.
Salisbury was the last peer to serve as Prime Minister, with the brief exception of the 14th Earl of Home who renounced his peerage within a few days of being appointed.
www.pineville.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Robert_Gascoyne-Cecil,_3rd_Marquess_of_Salisbury   (1400 words)

  
 The Scottish Genealogy Society - Peers and Heirs
Where the destination is to heirs male, a brother of the male holder of the Peerage without a son maybe termed the ''heir presumptive'' and he, of course, may be defeated by the birth of a son to the Peer.
Where a Peerage may descend through females a daughter may be the heir or heiress presumptive but would cease to be the heir presumptive if a brother, although younger, is born as he would become the heir apparent - because in any generation males are preferred to females.
The Earl of Mansfield was a Scot by birth, being younger son of the 5th Viscount of Stormont and brother of the titular Earl of Dunbar, the Jacobite Secretary of State in exile.
www.scotsgenealogy.com /online/peers_and_heirs.htm   (3971 words)

  
 Information About the Order Assassin and the Order Grump
Of the nobility, the peerage of Great Britain, or lords temporal, as forming (together with the bishops) one of the supreme branches of the legislature, I have before sufficiently spoken: we are here to consider them according to their several degrees, or titles of honour.
VI, the possession of the castle of Arundel was adjudged to confer an earldom on its possessor.
Actual proof of a tenure by barony became no longer necessary to constitute a lord of parliament; but the record of the writ of summons to them or their ancestors was admitted as a sufficient evidence of the tenure.
www.greeleynet.com /~maxalla/OKHSSub/Blacks1765.html   (2166 words)

  
 List of hereditary baronies
This page is meant to list all baronies and lordships of parliaments created in the peerages of England, Scotland, Great Britain, Ireland, and the United Kingdom.
2 Lordships of Parliament in the Peerage of Scotland, 1233-1707
4 Baronies in the Peerage of Ireland, 1223-1898
www.kiwipedia.com /list-of-baronies.html   (85 words)

  
 Manuscript concerning parliaments by the Earl of Anglesey, Arthur Annesley - UF Special and Area Studies Collections
He used his influence in moderating measures of revenge and violence, and while sitting in judgment on the regicides was on the side of leniency.
In November 1660 by his father's death he had become Viscount Valentia and Baron Mountnorris in the Irish peerage, and on the 20th April 1661 he was created Baron Annesley of Newport Pagnell in Buckinghamshire and Earl of Anglesey in the peerage of Great Britain.
He supported the King's administration in parliament, but opposed strongly the unjust measure which, on the abolition of the court of wards, placed the extra burden of taxation thus rendered necessary on the excise.
web.uflib.ufl.edu /spec/manuscript/guides/anglesey.htm   (545 words)

  
 article
He secured a position as a civil servant, and later as a peer, in Great Britain.
From 1956 to 1960 he served as the chair, and then the minister of community works and utilities, for Trinidad's first political party, the People's National Movement, which was led by chief minister Eric Williams.
Deciding to remain in Great Britain, he again became involved in broadcasting sports and political commentary.
caribbeanhalloffame.tripod.com /articlesport.htm   (562 words)

  
 Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-22)
Dukes in the Peerage of Great Britain
1655 – 5 March 1726), had been member of parliament for East Retford before his accession to the peerage in 1690.
While serving as one of the commissioners for the union with Scotland he was created Marquess of Dorchester in 1706, and took a leading part in the business of the House of Lords.
www.bexley.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Evelyn_Pierrepont,_1st_Duke_of_Kingston-upon-Hull   (211 words)

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