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Topic: Peloponnesian League


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  Peloponnesian League - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Peloponnesian League was an alliance of states in the Peloponnese in the 6th and 5th centuries BC.
The league was organized with Sparta as the hegemon, and was controlled by the council of allies which was composed of two bodies.
Thus the Peloponnesian League was not an "alliance" in the strictest sense of the word (nor was it wholly Peloponnesian for the entirety of its existence).
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Peloponnesian_League   (443 words)

  
 Peloponnesian War - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Peloponnesian War began in 431 BC between the Athenian Empire (or The Delian League) and the Peloponnesian League which included Sparta and Corinth.
According to Thucydides, the cause of the war was the "fear of the growth of the power of Athens" throughout the middle of the 5th century BC.
Athens, the largest member of the league and the major Greek naval power, took the leadership of the league and appointed financial officers to oversee its treasury, which was located on the island of Delos, the League headquarters.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Peloponnesian_War   (2999 words)

  
 Peloponnesian League
The Peloponnesian League was, essentially, a loose organization of towns that shared some sentimental ties, like the cult of Heracles and the believe that many of them were Dorians.
During the Persian War (480-479), the Peloponnesian League was the model of the Hellenic League that fought against the invaders.
After the Peloponnesian War, in which the Spartans and their allies defeated the Athenians and their allies, the Peloponnesian League continued to exist, even when the Persian king Artaxerxes II Mnemon made the Greeks sign a common peace treaty in which the autonomy of all towns was guaranteed ("the King's peace", 387/386).
www.livius.org /so-st/sparta/peloponnesian_league.html   (918 words)

  
 DELIAN LEAGUE - LoveToKnow Article on DELIAN LEAGUE   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The general affairs of the league were managed by a synod which met periodically in the temple of Apollo and Artemis at Delos, the ancient centre sanctified by the common worship of the Ionians.
It is, however, equally noticeable on the one hand that the main body of the allies was not affected, and on the other that the Peloponnesian League on the advice of Corinth officially recognized the right of Athens to deal with her rebellious subject allies, and refused to give help to the Samians.
The league was further weakened by the secession of Corcyra, and by 355 was reduced to Athens, Eubora and a few islands.
68.1911encyclopedia.org /D/DE/DELIAN_LEAGUE.htm   (6968 words)

  
 PELOPONNESIAN WAR - LoveToKnow Article on PELOPONNESIAN WAR   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
In 432 a conference of Peloponnesian allies was summoned and the Corinthian envoys urged the Spartans to declare war on the ground that the power of Athens was becoming so great as to constitute a danger to the other states.
In 429 the Peloponnesians were deterred by the plague from invading Attica and laid siege to Plataea in the interests of Thebes.
The Peloponnesian malcontents turned to Argos as a new leader, and an alliance was formed between Argos, Corinth, Elis, Mantinea and the Thraceward towns (420).
www.1911encyclopedia.org /P/PE/PELOPONNESIAN_WAR.htm   (7147 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Peloponnesian League
The Delian League was an association of Greek city-states in the 5th century BC.
After a coalition of Greek states thwarted an attempted invasion of the Greek peninsula by the Persian empire in in 478, several of those states formed the Delian league in order to create and fund a standing navy which could be used against the Persians in areas under their control.
Athens, the largest member of the league and the major Greek naval power, took the leadership of the league and controlled its treasury.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Peloponnesian-League   (1226 words)

  
 Ancient History Sourcebook: 11th Brittanica: Delian League
The league was, therefore, specifically a free confederation of autonomous [onian cities founded as a protection against the common danger which threatened the Aegean basin, and led by Athens in virtue of her predominant naval power as exhibited in the wae against Xerxes.
The is!and was conquered with great difmculty by the whole fo~ce of the league, and from the fact that the tribute of the Thracian cities and those in Hellespontine district was increased between 439 and 436 we must probably infer that Athens had to deal with a widespread feeling of discontent about this period.
It is, however, equally noticeable on the one hand that the main body of the allies was not affected, and on the other that the Peloponnesian League on the advice of Corinth omcially recognized the right of Athens to deal with her rebellious subject allies, and refused to give help to the Samians.
www.fordham.edu /halsall/ancient/eb11-delianleague.html   (5677 words)

  
 DELIAN LEAGUE - LoveToKnow Article on DELIAN LEAGUE   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Of the first ten years of the leagues history we know practically nothing, save that it was a period of steady, successful activity against the few remaining Persian.
Athens might fairly insist that the protection of the Aegean would become impossible if some of the chief islands were liable to be used as piratical strongholds, and further that it was only right that all should contribute in some way to the security which all enjoyed.
Though her secession, therefore, meant very little loss of strength, there were not wanting signs that the league was not destined to remain a power in the land.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /D/DE/DELIAN_LEAGUE.htm   (6968 words)

  
 Pelopennesian War: Historical Background: The Titans
Each league member was to have a say in the overall policy of the alliance; however, in practice, Athens's position typically carried the day.
By the early 460s, Athens's relative strength within the Delian League was such that the alliance took on the character and dynamics of an empire.
Still considered the greatest land-military power, Sparta continued to lead the Peloponnesian League, which rivaled the Athenian empire (Peloponnesus is the geographic region surrounding Sparta).
www.wwnorton.com /internal/lenses/cs_pw_titans.htm   (662 words)

  
 Detail Page   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Greeks called this conflict "the war between the Peloponnesians and the Athenians." One side consisted of Sparta and its core allies throughout the Peloponnese, grouped into a Spartan-led alliance known as the Peloponnesian League.
Thus, the Peloponnesian War was partly a conflict between two political ideologies—radical democracy, embodied by Athens and most of its allies, and the old-fashioned government of Oligarchy, championed by Sparta.
The Peloponnesian War's final nine years are sometimes known as the Ionian War, because the major campaigns shifted to the eastern Aegean and the shorelines of Asia Minor (particularly to the Greek region of western Asia Minor called Ionia).
www.fofweb.com /Onfiles/Ancient/AncientDetail.asp?iPin=GRE0383   (4501 words)

  
 Peloponnesian War Begins: 431 BC
431 BC The Peloponnesian War (431-404 BC) was a territorial, economic, and political conflict between the Spartan-led Peloponnesian league and the Athenian-led Delian League.
Sparta led the Peloponnesian league in response to the Delian league.
The Peloponnesian league felt threatened by the Athenian dominance of the area, so they built up their league by recruiting city-states for alliance with their League.
www.thenagain.info /WebChron/Mediterranean/PeloponBegin.html   (682 words)

  
 Ancient Greece: The Persian Wars
This new league had several purposes besides defense; one of these was to wage a military campaign against the Persians to free those Greek cities that were still under the control of the Persians.
Although the League was essentially democratic, they believed that the safety of the League and its objectives would be seriously compromised by states independent of the League.
Under his leadership, Athens and the League constantly and aggressively attacked the Persians; as the League grew, the power of Athens, as leader of the League, grew proportionately.
www.wsu.edu:8080 /~dee/GREECE/DELIAN.HTM   (661 words)

  
 Peloponnesian War
The Peloponnesian War was begun in 431 BC between the Peloponnesian League and the Athenian Empire.
The war was documented by Thucydides, an Athenian general, in his work The History of The Peloponnesian War The war lasted 27 years, with a brief truce in the middle.
According to Thucydides, the cause of the war was the "fear of the growth of the power of Athens" throughout the middle of the fifth century BCE.
home.comcast.net /~sylvanarrow/peloponnesian-war.htm   (2062 words)

  
 Peloponnesian War --  Encyclopædia Britannica
League policy, usually decisions on questions of war, peace, or alliance, was determined by federal congresses, summoned by the Spartans when they thought fit; each member state had one vote.
The league was a major force in Greek affairs, forming the nucleus of resistance to the Persian...
Thucydides' account of the Peloponnesian War is considered the first textbook on international relations.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9059015   (886 words)

  
 Peloponnesian War
Peloponnesian War: name of the conflict between Athens and Sparta that broke out in 431 and continued, with an interruption, until 404.
This was unacceptable, and war broke out: Athens and its Delian League were attacked by Sparta and its Peloponnesian League.
It gave up its empiree, joined the Peloponnesian League, and accepted a regime of thirty oligarchs, which included the radical Critias and the moderate Theramenes (text).
www.livius.org /pb-pem/peloponnesian_war/peloponnesian_war.html   (2637 words)

  
 The Hutchinson Encyclopedia: Peloponnesian War@ HighBeam Research   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
The Peloponnesian War (431-404 BC) was a 27-year, intermittent conflict between a land army (the Peloponnesian League), and a sea force (the Athenian empire), in a bid to become the undisputed leading Greek power.
The Athenian empire had developed out of the Delian League, and comprised Athens and the scattered Ionian islands and states on the E coast of the Aegean.
The Peloponnesian League was led by Sparta, and included cities in the Peloponnese (the peninsula forming the S part of Greece), on and...
www.highbeam.com /library/doc0.asp?DOCID=1P1:100190557&refid=ip_encyclopedia_hf   (194 words)

  
 Peloponnesian League: Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com - All about Peloponnesian League   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
By the end of the 6th century B.C., Sparta became the most powerful state in the Peloponnese, becoming the political and military hegemon over Argos.
The league was organised with Sparta as the hegemon, and was controlled by the council of allies which was composed of two bodies.
The first body was the assembly of Spartiates, and the Congress of Allies in which each allied state had one vote.
www.encyclopedian.com /pe/Peloponnesian-League.html   (246 words)

  
 Thucydides' Peloponnesian War
In the early years of the Delian League, Athens was led by the democratic anti-Spartan Aristides, who was renowned for his fair assessment of allied monetary contributions to the alliance, and the pro-Spartan Cimon, who was one of the many aristocratic enemies of the democracy at Athens.
Sparta and her Peloponnesian league decided not to intervene in the conflict between Athens and Samos, but two incidents involving the Corinthian colonies of Corcyra and Potidaea brought Athens and the Peloponnesians to the brink of war.
In the Peloponnesian war she again had the role of liberator with regard to the Greek states in the Delian league which had fallen subject to the tyranny of Athens.
depthome.brooklyn.cuny.edu /classics/dunkle/studyguide/thucydes.htm   (5139 words)

  
 History of SPARTA   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
She now assumes a leadership role, involving her neighbours in a defensive alliance which becomes known as the Peloponnesian League.
The terms accepted by members of the league are that they will fight under Spartan leadership in any joint campaign and that they will send troops to Sparta in the event of an uprising by the helots.
Sparta is having difficulty in retaining the loyalty of the members of its own Peloponnesian League, several of whom adopt democratic governments hostile in principle to the Spartan oligarchy.
www.historyworld.net /wrldhis/PlainTextHistories.asp?historyid=ac44   (1852 words)

  
 Peloponnesian League   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Sparta had created the Peloponnesian League by 500 BCE with Corinth as its other principal member.
It is thought by historians that in the Peloponnesian League Sparta played the hegemon whereas Athens actually acted as imperial power within the Delian League.
Thebes dealt Sparta a crushing defeat at Leuctra in 371 leading to the dissolution of the Peloponnesian League ca365.
www.worldhistoryplus.com /p/peloponnesianLeague.html   (109 words)

  
 Peloponnesian War
The war was documented by Thucydides, an Athenian general, in his work The History of The Peloponnesian War.
After a coalition of Greek states thwarted an attempted invasion of the Greek peninsula by the Persian empire, several of those states formed the Delian league in 478 BC in order to create and fund a standing navy which could be used against the Persians in areas under their control.
In 430, however, an outbreak of a plague (thought to be anthrax, tramped up from the soil by the thousands of refugees from Attica hiding out in Athens during a siege by the invading Peloponnesians) wiped out roughly one quarter of the Athenian population, including Pericles and his sons.
www.mlahanas.de /Greeks/History/PeloponnesianWar.html   (2545 words)

  
 Peloponnesian League --  Encyclopædia Britannica
The league was a major force in Greek affairs, forming the nucleus of resistance to the Persian invasions…
The original organization of the league, as sketched by Thucydides, indicates that all Greeks were invited to join to protect themselves from Achaemenian Persia.
It was founded in 1920 as part of the settlement that ended World War I. Weakened from the start by the refusal of the United States to join, the organization proved ineffective in defusing the hostilities that led to World War II in 1939.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9059014   (832 words)

  
 Untitled Document
Led by Athens, the Delian League liberated the Aegean and Ionian Greeks.
The Delian League treasury was relocated to Athens and League members were increasingly encouraged to make their contributions in gold rather than in triremes and hoplites.
The Peloponnesians invaded Attica during the harvest and burned the fields.
home.midsouth.rr.com /css/stratpolpelopwar.html   (1843 words)

  
 Sparta Reconsidered - Spartan Diplomacy
Diplomatic Finesse: The Peloponnesian League, Anti-Tyranny Doctrine, and Non-Intervention in Ionia
Although little is known about the workings of this League, it is clear that despite a certain recognition of Spartan leadership, a majority vote was needed for concerted action, that Sparta had only one vote, and at various times members of the league acted against Spartan policy with impunity.
In short, this was not a Spartan Empire disguised as a League (as the Delian League was to be later under Athenian hegemony).
www.elysiumgates.com /~helena/Diplomacy.html   (1102 words)

  
 Epic of the Peloponnesian War: Historical Commentary
The Delian League, formed in 478 as an alliance against Persia, assumed the form of an empire as the Athenians began using force to prevent any of their "allies" from withdrawing from the League.
The Peloponnesian War is traditionally divided into three phases: the Archidamian War (431-421), the Peace of Nicias and the Sicilian Expedition (420-413), and the Ionian War (412-404).
The Peloponnesians, by contrast, had to return home for the harvest, and were also much more vulnerable to the effects of having their lands ravaged.
www.warhorsesim.com /epw_hist.html   (10431 words)

  
 Read about Peloponnesian League at WorldVillage Encyclopedia. Research Peloponnesian League and learn about ...   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-06)
Persian Wars the League was expanded into the Hellenic League, including
Pausanias, but after he was recalled it was led by Cimon of Athens.
Sparta withdrew and the Peloponnesian League was refounded with Sparta's original allies, while the Hellenic League turned into the Athenian-led
encyclopedia.worldvillage.com /s/b/Peloponnesian_League   (396 words)

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