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Topic: Perestroika


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In the News (Wed 20 Mar 19)

  
  Perestroika Defined (1987)
Perestroika means overcoming the stagnation process, breaking down the braking mechanism, creating a dependable and effective mechanism for acceleration of social and economic progress and giving it greater dynamism.
Perestroika is the all-round intensification of the Soviet economy, the revival and development of the principles of democratic centralism in running the national economy, the universal introduction of economic methods, the renunciation of management by injunction and by administrative methods, and the overall encouragement of innovation and socialist enterprise.
Perestroika means the elimination from society of the distortions of socialist ethics, the consistent implementation of the principles of social justice.
www.historyguide.org /europe/perestroika.html   (383 words)

  
 Perestroika, by Marshall I. Goldman: The Concise Encyclopedia of Economics: Library of Economics and Liberty
Although the exact meaning of Gorbachev's perestroika changed from year to year, in those early months he spoke of intensifying and accelerating production in the machine tool industry.
The odds are that while perestroika may not require centuries to implement, it will not come quickly or painlessly.
Marshall I. Goldman is the Kathryn W. Davis Professor of Russian Economics at Wellesley College, and the associate director of the Russian Research Center at Harvard University.
www.econlib.org /library/Enc/Perestroika.html   (1770 words)

  
  Perestroika and the Soviet Economy
Other measures introduced under perestroika were leasing land to farmers (all land was owned by the state), allowing loss making factories to go bankrupt and limited numbers of private enterprises to open.
Perestroika was to little too late to revive the Soviet economy.
The failure of perestroika was exacerbated by Gorbachev's continual boasting about the results that the reforms would have.
www.historyorb.com /russia/perestroika.shtml   (649 words)

  
  Perestroika - MSN Encarta
Perestroika (Russian, “restructuring”), a key element of the campaign initiated by Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev to reform and revitalize the Soviet system.
Perestroika at first mainly referred to efforts to reform the ailing Soviet command economy by reducing the power of central authorities and introducing elements of a market-based system.
Perestroika also came to mean changes in other aspects of the Soviet system, including the bureaucracy and political life.
uk.encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_781529158/Perestroika.html   (396 words)

  
  Perestroika
"Perestroika" is a Russian word, meaning "restructuring" or "reconstruction." It refers to the series of political, economic, and social reforms and foreign policy changes undertaken by the Soviet Communist Party in the years 1985 to 1991.
The architect of perestroika as an official policy was Mikhail Gorbachev, who became party secretary in 1985, and thus head of state.
Perestroika involved a series of political and economic reforms that, modest at the outset, unleashed a torrent of change that led to the collapse of the Soviet Union.
www.referenceforbusiness.com /encyclopedia/Per-Pro/Perestroika.html   (1271 words)

  
 The Perestroika Movement
Perestroika's original e-mail message, dozens of scholars wrote back saying they had seen colleagues denied jobs and tenure and have trouble publishing their work because their research methods did not conform with the quantitative approach championed by the powerful minority that controls the association and the journal.
Perestroika, who receives messages at an anonymous e- mail account at Yahoo.com and is rumored to be not one but several junior professors (or possibly graduate students), is orchestrating the protest under the cloak of anonymity, presumably out of fear of reprisals.
Perestroika and his comrades have discussed several solutions, including giving association members a choice of journals to subscribe to when they pay their dues and putting the journal online so more articles can be published.
www.btinternet.com /~pae_news/Perestroika.htm   (5750 words)

  
 Kids.Net.Au - Encyclopedia > Perestroika
Perestroika was one of the policies introduced to the Soviet Union by Mikhail Gorbachev in 1985.
In contrast to economic reforms in China, perestroika is widely regarded to have failed in its original goal of restructuring the Soviet economy.
Among the reasons cited for perestroika's failure was the inability to promote new private or semi-private economic entities and the unwillingness of Gorbachev to reform Soviet agriculture.
www.kids.net.au /encyclopedia-wiki/pe/Perestroika   (248 words)

  
 Storming the Palace in Political Science (The Perestroika Movement)
Perestroika," it was already clear that the pseudonymous polemicist had tapped a well of resentment in the profession.
Perestroika first distributed his complaints on the Internet, the movement's main target was the association itself.
Perestroika vowed to fight homogeneity and "cronyism" in the discipline.
www.btinternet.com /~pae_news/Perestroika/Miller.htm   (2017 words)

  
 Russia, Soviet Union, Perestroika - CDI RW 11 March 2005
They are obviously meant to depreciate historical achievement of perestroika, which gave an incentive to the democratic renewal of the country and the whole world.
Perestroika liberated the democratic potential of the Soviet society, although the 1990s and the start of the new century were marked with an aspiration to bring that potential to nothing.
Perestroika definitely has its significance not only as the last chapter of the Soviet history, but as the unfinished chapter of the world history too.
www.cdi.org /russia/345-2.cfm   (629 words)

  
 Perestroika and Glasnost
"Perestroika" (restructuring) and "glasnost" (openness) were Mikhail Gorbachev's watchwords for the renovation of the Soviet body politic and society that he pursued as general secretary of the Communist Party from 1985 until 1991.
By 1987, Gorbachev was acknowledging that perestroika was a word with many meanings, but "the one which expresses its essence most accurately...
But as the country became overwhelmed by the avalanche of reports about burgeoning criminality as well as revelations of state crimes of the past ("retrospective glasnost"), glasnost effectively undermined public confidence in the ability of the state to lead society to the promised land of prosperity or even arrest its descent into poverty and chaos.
www.soviethistory.org /index.php?action=L2&SubjectID=1985perestroika&Year=1985   (335 words)

  
 Highbeam Encyclopedia - Search Results for perestroika
Perestroika [restructuring] was the term attached to the attempts (1985-91) by Mikhail Gorbachev to transform the stagnant, inefficient command economy of the Soviet Union into a decentralized market-oriented economy.
Perestroika and its impact on the Soviet labor market.
Saying nyet to Communism: party bosses and perestroika are the issues for Soviet voters.
www.encyclopedia.com /SearchResults.aspx?Q=perestroika   (696 words)

  
 Yakovlev on Perestroika - 1 of 5
One answer is that perestroika was a conspiracy organized by the CIA, and by the West in general, a conspiracy which aimed at military/political subversion of the USSR and of communism in general.
he second answer is that perestroika was a betrayal, a betrayal either intended as such from the very beginning and quite conscious, or a betrayal that just happened to occur, the result of the course of events, a betrayal with respect to one's country, to one's class, and to one's people.
Those who adhere to this explanation would state that the "perestroika people" did not know the real situation that existed in the country; they were unable to find those factors and those mechanisms that drive real life in the country, and their short-sightedness resulted in political reckless driving.
globetrotter.berkeley.edu /Elberg/Yakovlev/yak-elb1.html   (859 words)

  
 Spartanburg SC | GoUpstate.com | Spartanburg Herald-Journal   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Perestroika (, IPA:) is the Russian term (which passed into English) for the economic reforms introduced in June 1987 by the Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev.
Another fundamental difference is that where perestroika was accompanied by greater political freedoms under Gorbachev's glasnost policies, Chinese economic reform has been accompanied by continued authoritarian rule and a suppression of political dissidents, most notably at Tiananmen Square.
The perestroika reforms began the process leading to the dismantling of the Soviet-era command economy and its replacement with a market economy.
www.goupstate.com /apps/pbcs.dll/section?category=NEWS&template=wiki&text=Perestroika   (1644 words)

  
 Perestroika - Uncyclopedia, the content-free encyclopedia
Perestroika was a policy of transformation adopted by the Soviet president Mikhail Gorbachev.
The national anthem was changed from "Unbreakable Union of Freeborn Republics" to "Oy gevalt," the body of Lenin in Red Square was replaced with a cheerful figure of Moishe Pipek, and the standard term of address was changed from "Comrade" to "Dumkop".
In 1991, Gorbachev was overthrown by the prophet Boris Yeltsin, who argued that the Transformers were displeased by the fact that Russians were not drinking enough vodka and promptly proceeded to lead by example.
uncyclopedia.org /wiki/Perestroika   (353 words)

  
 Mission in post-perestroika Russia
The Russian word perestroika, meaning restructuring, was intro- duced by Mikhail Gorbachev, the former General Secretary of the Communist Party of the USSR, in the course of the late 1980s.
The success of perestroika will lay bare the class narrow- mindedness and egoism of the forces that are ruling the West today, the forces which are hooked on militarism and the arms race, and which are looking for enemies all over the globe.
Perestroika, as envisioned by Gorbachev, presupposed an economic system which surely needed restructuring, but was by no means doomed to fail.
www.geocities.com /missionalia/reimer96.htm   (7976 words)

  
 Why Perestroika Failed - Peter Boettke
Why Perestroika Failed is the first book to apply an Austrian market process approach to analyze the economic dimensions of the Soviet system, and a public choice approach to address the political aspects.
A knowledge of why perestroika failed is a crucial importance as the former Soviet republics and East and Central Europe chart a new course.
Perestroika did not bring changes in institutional rules which would allow experiments in social organization that are seen as a basic requirements of any sustainable economic system....
economics.gmu.edu /pboettke/pubs/whyperestroika.html   (658 words)

  
 PERESTROIKA
Perestroika and glasnost had unleashed winds of change that had affected every aspect of social, political and economical life in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe.
The term Perestroika, which means free economical re-structuring, was coined by Mikhail Gorbachev in 1987.
He stated: "Perestroika is a thorough renewal of every aspect of Soviet life...it is the fullest exposure of the humanist nature of our social system in its crucial aspect, economic, social, political and moral" (Gorbachev 27).
www.bu.edu /econ/faculty/kyn/newweb/economic_systems/Economics/Command_Econ/Reforms/perestroika.htm   (904 words)

  
 Yakovlev on Perestroika - 3 of 5
t is true that perestroika as political doctrine and as practice has appeared on the basis of the socialist idea and on the basis of the socialist mode of implementing that idea in life.
Perestroika stressed rationalization of doctrine, putting away all sorts of dogmatism and all sorts of scholasticism.
We assumed that perestroika not only needed this sort of reformation but as a matter of fact it started this reformation and it was a stimulus to its development.
globetrotter.berkeley.edu /Elberg/Yakovlev/yak-elb3.html   (717 words)

  
 Why Perestroika Failed - Peter Boettke
Why Perestroika Failed is the first book to apply an Austrian market process approach to analyze the economic dimensions of the Soviet system, and a public choice approach to address the political aspects.
A knowledge of why perestroika failed is a crucial importance as the former Soviet republics and East and Central Europe chart a new course.
Perestroika did not bring changes in institutional rules which would allow experiments in social organization that are seen as a basic requirements of any sustainable economic system....
www.gmu.edu /departments/economics/pboettke/pubs/whyperestroika.html   (658 words)

  
 The Chronicle: Colloquy Live Transcript
Perestroika," a pseudonymous member, or members, of the political-science profession, set off a protest movement a year ago, arguing that scholars with mathematical approaches dominate the discipline and that the American Political Science Association and its flagship journal are too rigid and support only certain kinds of research and scholars.
First, this question implies that the Perestroika movement makes sense only if it is seeking to replace one paradigm with another, if it is a "unified movement." But the shared goal is to create space for a wide variety of kinds of political inquiry to flourish.
There is no single unified Perestroika critique, but one can obtain from the Perestroika web site copies both of Greg Kasza's statement of Perestroikan objectives, which was widely endorsed by Perestroika participants, and the letter I drafted last year which summarizes many of the concerns that many Perestroikans had up to that point.
chronicle.com /colloquylive/2001/09/perestroika   (4091 words)

  
 IMPACT OF PERESTROIKA AND GLASNOST ON SOVIET EDUCATION
In the findings, I note there is no way of knowing at this time the real impact perestroika and glasnost has had on Soviet education; nor is there a way of knowing the impact these measures will have on the educational system now emerging as a result of the breakup of the USSR.
I journal the certainty that perestroika and glasnost were intended to preserve institutions such as education and vospitania (upbringing) as pillars of national belief and key determinants of social structure; that perestroika and glasnost were part of a bigger representation.
In the years to come, the extent to which vospitania moves away from an administered model through glasnost, or openness, to a system wherein individuals and groups are allowed to govern their own interest will help to define the degree of transition to democracy that has taken place.
www.friends-partners.org /oldfriends/education/russian.education.research.html   (6518 words)

  
 perestroika. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05
Perestroika [restructuring] was the term attached to the attempts (1985–91) by Mikhail Gorbachev to transform the stagnant, inefficient command economy of the Soviet Union into a decentralized market-oriented economy.
Industrial managers and local government and party officials were granted greater autonomy, and open elections were introduced in an attempt to democratize the Communist party organization.
By 1991, perestroika was on the wane, and after the failed August Coup of 1991 was eclipsed by the dramatic changes in the constitution of the union.
www.bartleby.com /65/pe/perestro.html   (163 words)

  
 Perestroika -- Gorby's Grand Deception -- Excerpts and Repercussions
Gorbachev says, "The essence of perestroika lies in the fact that it unites socialism with democracy and revives the Leninist concept of socialist construction both in theory and in practice."
There is the view that it has been necessitated by the disastrous state of the Soviet economy and that it signifies disenchantment with socialism and a crisis for its ideals and ultimate goals.
is the principal guarantee of the irreversibility of perestroika.
www.greaterthings.com /News/Perestroika/index.html   (1258 words)

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