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Topic: Peter Ward (paleontologist)


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 Lester Frank Ward
Ward, Lester Frank, 1841–1913, American sociologist and paleontologist, b.
Interview: Dr. Peter Ward and Alexis Rockman on the book "Future Evolution" and their visions of future life on Earth (Talk of the Nation Science Friday (NPR))
One of the first and most important of American sociologists, Ward developed a theory of planned progress called telesis, whereby man, through education and development of intellect, could direct social evolution.
www.infoplease.com /ce6/people/A0851459.html   (231 words)

  
 The Shape of Life . Dr. Peter Ward PBS
Peter D. Ward, Ph.D., is a paleontologist and professor of Geological Sciences at the University of Washington in Seattle.
Explore the Chambered Nautilus and the research of Dr. Ward
www.pbs.org /kcet/shapeoflife/explorations/bio_ward.html   (106 words)

  
 The Greatest Catastrophe on Earth :: Astrobiology Magazine :: Search for Life in the Universe
Summary (Apr 14, 2004): Paleontologist Peter Ward of the University of Washington discusses his latest book, entitled "Gorgon: Paleontology, Obsession, and the Greatest Catastrophe on Earth", in which he follows the fossil trail of what might be left after over seven of every ten species on Earth disappeared 250 million years ago.
Peter Ward's newest book, "Gorgon," is part travel journal, part scientific exploration.
The Gorgon is an extremely rare fossil - it has only been found in South Africa, except for a few in the Eastern Soviet Union.
www.astrobio.net /news/article922.html   (106 words)

  
 'The end of the world' has already begun, UW scientists say
In "The Life and Death of Planet Earth," Brownlee and UW paleontologist Peter Ward use current scientific understanding of planets and stars, as well as the parameters of life, to provide a glimpse of the second half of life on Earth and what comes after.
The prospects of humans surviving by moving to some other habitable planet or moon aren't good, Brownlee and Ward contend, because even if such a place were found, getting there would be a huge obstacle.
"The Life and Death of Planet Earth" explains how the myriad life on Earth today was preceded by a long period of microbial dominance, and the authors contend that complex life eventually will disappear and be succeeded again by a period of only microbial life.
www.washington.edu /newsroom/news/2003archive/01-03archive/k011303a.html   (886 words)

  
 rareearth.asp
In their controversial book RARE EARTH, distinguished paleontologist Peter D. Ward and noted astronomer Donald Brownlee propose nothing less than a new hypothesis about life in our universe.
Contrary to the popular opinion (derived in large part from the mainstream media's short attention span), authors Brownlee and Ward exhibit a healthy objectivity for the possibility of complex life in the universe.
In the course of researching RARE EARTH, Destination: Space repeatedly came across 'media bytes' that portrayed the Rare Earth Hypothesis as a blanket statement that life does not and can not exist beyond our world.
www.destinationspace.net /frontier/rareearth.asp   (369 words)

  
 rareearth.asp
In their controversial book RARE EARTH, distinguished paleontologist Peter D. Ward and noted astronomer Donald Brownlee propose nothing less than a new hypothesis about life in our universe.
Contrary to the popular opinion (derived in large part from the mainstream media's short attention span), authors Brownlee and Ward exhibit a healthy objectivity for the possibility of complex life in the universe.
In the course of researching RARE EARTH, Destination: Space repeatedly came across 'media bytes' that portrayed the Rare Earth Hypothesis as a blanket statement that life does not and can not exist beyond our world.
www.destinationspace.net /frontier/rareearth.asp   (369 words)

  
 Our Lonely Galaxy: Part II
Peter Ward: Well the first thing that you should find striking about us sitting at this stage is not that David is here, because he's a planetary scientist, but that the person in the middle, me, is a paleontologist.
And I think it says an awful lot about the evolution of astrobiology as a field that someone who studies the fossil record should be sharing the stage at all with Frank Drake.
If someone told me even six or seven years ago that this would be happening, I'd have laughed.
www.spacedaily.com /news/life-03zzb.html   (1579 words)

  
 The Life And Death Of Planet Earth
After reading the book The Life and Death of Planet Earth, by Peter Ward and Donald Brownlee, my geological interests expanded from that of just 'local' geology on this planet to more of a 'universal,' and even a 'cosmological' scope.
The authors, a paleontologist and an astronomer respectively, introduce the emerging science of astrobiology, the study of how planets and organisms live and die.
I would like to share this experience and new-found concept with those of you who are interested.
www.dartmouth.edu /~ilead/courses/winter04/planetearth.html   (310 words)

  
 World Future Society Book Review
In The Life and Death of Planet Earth, astrophysicist Don Brownlee and paleontologist Peter Ward, both from the University of Washington, attempt to construct a plausible 12-billion-year birth-to-death biography of our home planet.
The idea that the period during which Earth could sustain life in any form makes up only a small fraction of our planet’s existence reinforces the authors’ contention that intelligent life may be extremely rare in the universe.
To do this, they combine evidence of the earth’s history preserved in layers of rock, soil, and ice with data from observations of the solar system and analysis of light from distant stars and galaxies.
www.wfs.org /revwardnd03.htm   (696 words)

  
 "Rare Earth Debate" © CBC — Quirks & Quarks 2000
Bob McDonald: Doctor Seth Shostak is an astronomer with the SETI institute in California and Doctor Peter Ward is a paleontologist at the University of Washington in Seattle.
And Dr. Seth Shostak is an astronomer from the Search for Extra Terrestrial Intelligence, or SETI Institute, in Mountain View California; a group that’s been looking for signals from other intelligent life in the universe.
Seth Shostak: Well, this line of argumentation kind of reminds me of when I was back in school my roommate was looking for a date and he lamented are a million women in this city and I can’t seem to find a date.
www3.sympatico.ca /n.rieck/docs/rare_earth_debate.html   (3317 words)

  
 'The end of the world' has already begun, UW scientists say
In "The Life and Death of Planet Earth," Brownlee and UW paleontologist Peter Ward use current scientific understanding of planets and stars, as well as the parameters of life, to provide a glimpse of the second half of life on Earth and what comes after.
At noon — after 12 billion years — the ever-expanding sun, transformed into a red giant, will engulf the planet, melting away any evidence it ever existed and sending molecules and atoms that once were Earth floating off into space.
But in a new book, two noted University of Washington astrobiologists say the planet already has begun the long process of devolving into a burned-out cinder, eventually to be swallowed by the sun.
www.washington.edu /newsroom/news/2003archive/01-03archive/k011303a.html   (886 words)

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