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Topic: Phenylpropanolamine


  
  Phenylpropanolamine
In order to understand how phenylpropanolamine works in the body, it is important to understand some background regarding the “autonomic nervous system.” The autonomic nervous system can be thought of as the “automatic” nervous system in that it controls physiologic functions that one is not aware of.
Phenylpropanolamine is also a potent decongestant and is a common cold remedy ingredient.
Phenylpropanolamine acts by causing the release of a hormone and neurotransmitter called “norepinephrine.” With chronic use, it is possible to deplete the body’s stores of norepinephrine and the patient will appear to become “resistent” to the effects of the drug.
www.marvistavet.com /html/body_phenylpropanolamine.html   (666 words)

  
 phenylpropanolamine - [Medication]
Phenylpropanolamine has been associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke (bleeding into the brain or into tissue surrounding the brain) in women.
Phenylpropanolamine is used to treat the congestion associated with allergies, hay fever, sinus irritation, and the common cold.
Phenylpropanolamine also causes a decrease in appetite and is used in some over-the-counter diet aids.
www.peacehealth.org /kbase/multum/d00767a1.htm   (1200 words)

  
 Complications of phenylpropanolamine American Family Physician - Find Articles
Phenylpropanolamine, a common ingredient in many prescription and over-the-counter medications, is not a benign compound.(1-4) It can cause severe death when it is unknowingly ingested by a person who is sensitive to it or who may consume more than the recommended dosage.
Phenylpropanolamine ingestion must always be included in the differential diagnosis and management of psychoses, seizures, strokes and hypertension.
Hypertension associated with phenylpropanolamine is often accompanied by a reflex bradycardia.(5) when tachycardia occurs, it is usually the result of concomitant drug use, such as an antimuscarinic agent, another sympathomimetic agent or a xanthine derivative.
www.findarticles.com /p/articles/mi_m3225/is_n4_v39/ai_7609837   (771 words)

  
 Phenylpropanolamine   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Another effect of phenylpropanolamine is constriction of blood vessels in the nasal cavity, which reduces nasal congestion.
Phenylpropanolamine is no longer commercially available in the United States; however, some veterinarians still have supplies of this drug and the drug is available through compounding pharmacies.
The primary use of phenylpropanolamine is treatment of urinary incontinence (involuntary leakage of urine from the bladder).
www.petplace.com /drug-library/phenylpropanolamine/page1.aspx   (610 words)

  
 Phenylpropanolamine Drug Information
Phenylpropanolamine (fen-ill-proe-pa-NOLE-a-meen), commonly known as PPA, is used as a nasal decongestant or as an appetite suppressant.
Phenylpropanolamine clears nasal congestion (stuffy nose) by narrowing or constricting the blood vessels.
Phenylpropanolamine should not be used for weight control in children under the age of 12 years.
www.drugs.com /cons/Phenylpropanolamine.html   (1540 words)

  
 PPA Recall Information - Phenylpropanolamine, Dexatrim, Triaminic
Phenylpropanolamine is a common ingredient in appetite suppressants such as Acutrim and Dexatrim as well as many popular cough/cold medications such as Alka-Seltzer Plus (Adult and Children's), Comtrex, Contac, Coricidin, Dimetapp, Robitussin-CF, and Triaminic.
Phenylpropanolamine, also known as PPA, is a chemical that been used for more than 50 years and is found in many over-the-counter cold and cough remedies and appetite suppressants.
Phenylpropanolamine (PPA) is believed to increase the risk of hemorrhagic stroke, especially in young women.
www.elslaw.com /ppa_overview.htm   (349 words)

  
 PPA phenylpropanolamine Legal Network: Overview   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Phenylpropanolamine also called PPA is an ingredient used in cold relief drugs, nasal decongestants to relieve stuffy nose or sinus congestion, appetite suppressants and dietary aids.
Although phenylpropanolamine has been used for many years there have always been a small number of people taking the drug that have had strokes.
If you believe PPA (phenylpropanolamine) is related to a stroke or injury you or a loved one sustained, you may be entitled to a large compensatory award.
www.phenylpropanolamine-ppa.com /pages/ppa_overview.html   (428 words)

  
 Supplements A to Z - Real Muscle Building and Fitness SOLUTIONS
Phenylpropanolamine is a synthetic derivative of ephedrine and is structurally similar to pseudoephedrine.
It is commonly known as PPA and is used traditionally as a nasal decongestant and appetite suppressant.
Phenylpropanolamine clears nasal congestion (i.e., a stuffy nose) by narrowing or constricting the blood vessels.
www.realsolutionsmag.com /supplements/supplements.aspx?nid=290   (440 words)

  
 SKAPP :: Case Studies in Science Policy :: Phenylpropanolamine
Phenylpropanolamine (PPA) has been used for decades in various medications, including diet pills (Dexatrim, and others), and cough and cold medications (Ornade, Dimetapp, and others) that were sold both with and without prescriptions.
Phenylpropanolamine and hemorrhagic stroke in the Hemorrhagic Stroke Project: a reappraisal in the context of science, the Food and Drug Administration, and the law.
Michaels D. Letter) Regarding "phenylpropanolamine and hemorrhagic stroke in the hemorrhagic stroke project": mercenary epidemiology-data reanalysis and reinterpretation for sponsors with financial interest in the outcome.
www.defendingscience.org /case_studies/Phenylpropanolamine.cfm   (1602 words)

  
 Guaifenesin-phenylpropanolamine Information on Healthline
Phenylpropanolamine, an ingredient in this product, has been associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke (bleeding into the brain or into tissue surrounding the brain) in women.
Guaifenesin and phenylpropanolamine is used to treat the symptoms of the common cold and of infections of the sinuses, lungs, and throat.
Guaifenesin and phenylpropanolamine is in the FDA pregnancy category C. This means that it is not known whether guaifenesin and phenylpropanolamine will harm an unborn baby.
www.healthline.com /multumcontent/guaifenesin-phenylpropanolamine   (813 words)

  
 Phenylpropanolamine   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Phenylpropanolamine is also used as an adjunct to calorie restriction in short-term weight loss.
Phenylpropanolamine and ephedrine have similar effects and side effects.
Additionally, in a study of 16 healthy people, phenylpropanolamine plus caffeine resulted in higher serum caffeine levels than when caffeine was given alone.
www.kroger.com /hn/Drug/Phenylpropanolamine.htm   (575 words)

  
 Phenylpropanolamine Or PPA: Claims For Stroke Resulting From Phenylpropanolamine Or PPA In Over the counter Diet Drugs ...
Phenylpropanolamine ("fen-el-pro-pa-nol-a-mine" or "PPA") is an ingredient used in many over-the-counter and prescription cough and cold medications as a decongestant to relieve stuffy nose or sinus congestion and in over-the-counter weight loss products.
Over-the-counter drug products containing this ingredient may be identified by looking for "phenylpropanolamine" in the list of active ingredients on the label.
It is strongly recommended that any injured victim of Phenylpropanolamine or PPA, reading this page in an effort to understand the drug or a claim arising out of its use, who is not already represented by an experienced lawyer, immediately seek the same.
www.ashcraftandgerel.com /ppa.html   (1248 words)

  
 PHENYLPROPANOLAMINE   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Phenylpropanolamine is a non-methylated form of Ephedrine (also derived from a popular weight-loss agent known as the herb Ma Haung—which is the herb Ephedra).
The researchers there reported that phenylpropanolamine was effective at about 0.5 kilograms (1 pound) of weight loss/week, for a total of 5 kilograms (10 pounds), and kept the weight off after stabilization.
Phenylpropanolamine is the most frequently prescribed diet medication in South America, and recommendations are to use it over a period of many years.
www.i-55.com /drdiet.com/articles/035.htm   (579 words)

  
 PPA phenylpropanolamine Legal Network: FDA Health Warning
Phenylpropanolamine is an ingredient used in many over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription cough and cold medications as a decongestant and in OTC weight loss products.
NDAC determined that there is an association between phenylpropanolamine and hemorrhagic stroke and recommended that phenylpropanolamine not be considered safe for over-the-counter use.
FDA does not consider the conditions for which phenylpropanolamine is used (over-the-counter or by prescription) as justifying the risk of this serious event.
www.phenylpropanolamine-ppa.com /pages/fda_recall.html   (546 words)

  
 Questions and Answers Phenylpropanolamine (PPA) Advisory
Phenylpropanolamine is an ingredient used in prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) drug products as a nasal decongestant to relieve stuffy nose or sinus congestion and in OTC weight control drug products to control appetite.
Phenylpropanolamine has been used for many years and a very small number of people taking the drug have had strokes.
Phenylpropanolamine is found in some prescription and OTC nasal decongestants and cough/cold products and OTC products for weight control.
www.fda.gov /cder/drug/infopage/ppa/qa.htm   (613 words)

  
 phenylpropanolamine information
Phenylpropanolamine (PPA) is a drug of the phenethylamine family used as a...
Phenylpropanolamine is a drug used to relieve nasal congestion due to colds, hay...
This case study on phenylpropanolamine (PPA) and the multi-district litigation...
www.drugs.com /sch/phenylpropanolamine/br_phenylpropanolamine   (311 words)

  
 Phenylpropanolmine used in Dogs
The side effects phenylpropanolamine like high blood pressure problems reported in humans that caused the human product recall have not been shown to occur in pets.
Phenylpropanolamine has been used for many years to successfully treat incontinence in dogs.
There were several years that it was not available when the FDA removed the human drug and it had to be reconsidered as a veterinary drug.
www.vetinfo4dogs.com /dphenylpropanolamine.html   (1401 words)

  
 pheniramine/ pyrilamine/ phenyltoloxamine/ phenylpropanolamine - [Medication]
Phenylpropanolamine, an ingredient in this product, has been associated with an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke (bleeding into the brain or into tissue surrounding the brain) in women.
Pheniramine/pyrilamine/phenyltoloxamine/phenylpropanolamine is used to treat nasal congestion and sinusitis (inflammation of the sinuses) associated with allergies, hay fever, and the common cold.
Children are more susceptible than adults to the effects of medicines and may have unusual reactions.
www.peacehealth.org /kbase/multum/d03308a1.htm   (1379 words)

  
 aspirin/chlorpheniramine/dextromethorphan/ phenylpropanolamine - Fort Lauderdale, Florida   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
The combination, aspirin/chlorpheniramine/ dextromethorphan/phenylpropanolamine is used to treat nasal congestion; sinusitis (inflammation of the sinuses); headache; fever; and aches, pains, and coughs associated with allergies, hay fever, and the common cold.
In children younger than 20 years of age, aspirin may increase the risk of Reye's syndrome, a rare but often fatal condition.
Other medications may also contain aspirin, chlorpheniramine, phenylpropanolamine, or other similar drugs, and you may accidentally take too much and harm yourself.
www.browardhealth.org /19979.cfm   (1532 words)

  
 MotherNature.com - Phenylpropanolamine
Phenylpropanolamine is a drug used to relieve nasal congestion due to colds, hay fever, upper respiratory allergies, and sinusitis.
Phenylpropanolamine is also used as an adjunct to calorie restriction in short-term weight loss.
Phenylpropanolamine and ephedrine have similar effects and side effects.
www.mothernature.com /Library/Ency/Index.cfm?Id=1462003   (744 words)

  
 pseudoephedrine | phenylpropanolamine | ephedrines decongestants
That is the emphatic conclusion of a UK study, which examined the effects of two such preparations, given in maximal recommended therapeutic doses, on the performance of a small group of highly-trained male endurance runners.
Both belong to a class of drugs known as ‘ephedrines’, which are banned in competition because of their similarity to amphetamines (not known as speed for nothing!).
It is likely, they say, that any ergogenic properties these drugs possess may be evident only in higher doses, which are associated with hazardous side effects and would therefore be unethical to use in a trial.
www.pponline.co.uk /encyc/pseudoephedrine.html   (437 words)

  
 Phenylpropanolamine PPA stroke Dexatrim Acutrim legal aid   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
The Committee determined that there is an association between PPA and hemorrhagic stroke and recommended that PPA not be considered safe for over-the-counter use.
Phenylpropanolamine is commonly found in appetite suppressants and cold remedies.
The results suggest that phenylpropanolamine in appetite suppressants, and possibly in cough and cold remedies, is an independent risk factor for hemorrhagic stroke in women.
www.phenylpropanolamine-ppa-stroke.com   (2246 words)

  
 Phenylpropanolmine used in Dogs   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-20)
Phenylpropanolamine is still available from some compounding pharmacies.
The major risk with phenylpropanolamine appears to be an increase in the
If phenylpropanolamine doesn't work, there are other medications that can be used.
www.vetinfo.com /dphenylpropanolamine.html   (1118 words)

  
 Phenylpropanolamine - PPA - Hemorrhagic Stroke
The law firm of Early, Ludwick, Sweeney and Strauss is currently reviewing claims and representing people who have taken the drug Phenylpropanolamine (PPA) and have been injured.
Common questions from people who have taken drug products containing Phenylpropanolamine (PPA) with answers from attorneys at Early, Ludwick, Sweeney and Strauss.
Recent articles in the media that describe the potential harmful side effects of Phenylpropanolamine (PPA).
www.elslaw.com /ppa.htm   (207 words)

  
 chlorpheniramine/phenindamine/phenylpropanolamine - Fort Lauderdale, Florida
Chlorpheniramine/phenindamine/phenylpropanolamine is used to treat nasal congestion and sinusitis (inflammation of the sinuses) associated with allergies, hay fever, and the common cold.
Your pharmacist has additional information about chlorpheniramine/phenindamine/ phenylpropanolamine written for health professionals that you may read.
Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
www.browardhealth.org /19754.cfm   (1293 words)

  
 Phenylpropanolamine (PPA) Information Page
This proposed rule reclassifies phenylpropanolamine as nonmonograph (Category II) not generally recognized as safe and effective.
The Agency believes this to be the most accurate method for determining the PPA content of OTC products rather than providing an incomplete or out-of-date list of products that may have already been reformulated and no longer contain PPA.
Scientists at Yale University School of Medicine recently issued a report entitled "Phenylpropanolamine and Risk of Hemorrhagic Stroke: Final Report of the Hemorrhagic Stroke Project." This study reports that taking PPA increases the risk of hemorrhagic stroke (bleeding into the brain or into tissue surrounding the brain) in women.
www.fda.gov /cder/drug/infopage/ppa/default.htm   (484 words)

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