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Topic: Philetas of Cos


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  Philetas of Cos - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Philetas of Cos, Alexandrian poet and critic, flourished in the second half of the 4th century BC.
He is frequently mentioned by Ovid and Propertius, the latter of whom imitated him and preferred him to his rival Callimachus, whose superior mythological lore was more to the taste of the Alexandrian critics.
Philetas was also the author of a vocabulary called "Aro/cra, explaining the meanings of rare and obscure words, including words peculiar to certain dialects; and of notes on Homer, severely criticized by Aristarchus.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Philetas_of_Cos   (231 words)

  
 PHILETAS OF COS - LoveToKnow Article on PHILETAS OF COS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
PHILETAS of Cos, Alexandrian poet and critic, flourished in the second half of the 4th century B.C. He was tutor to the son of Ptolemy I. of Egypt, and also taught Theocritus and the grammarian Zenodotus.
Philetas was also the author of a vocabulary called "Aro/cra, explaining the meanings of rare PHILIDORPHILIP (KINGS OF MACEDONIA)
PHILIDOR, FRANCOIS ANDRfi DANICAN (1726-1795), French composer and chess-player, was born at Dreux, on the 7th of September 1726, of a musical family.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /P/PH/PHILETAS_OF_COS.htm   (2471 words)

  
 Philetas of Cos -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
His elegies, chiefly of an amatory nature and singing the praises of his mistress Battis (or Bittis), were much admired by the Romans.
Philetas was also the author of a vocabulary called "Aro/cra, explaining the meanings of rare and obscure words, including words peculiar to certain dialects; and of notes on (An ancient Hebrew unit of capacity equal to 10 baths or 10 ephahs) Homer, severely criticized by (A bright crater on the moon) Aristarchus.
Fragments edited by N Bach (1828), and (additional info and facts about Theodor Bergk) Theodor Bergk, Poetae lyrici graeci; see also EW Maass, De tribus Philetae carminibus (1895).
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/P/Ph/Philetas_of_Cos.htm   (210 words)

  
 Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, page 266 (v. 3)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
The elegies of Philetas were chiefly amatory, and a large portion of them was devoted to the praises of his mistress Bittis, or, as the Latin poets give the name, Battis (Herme-sianax, 1.
Nothing is left of it, except a few scattered explanations of words, from which, however, it may be inferred that Philetas made great use of the light thrown on the meanings of words by their dialectic varieties.
In the absence of any further information, we must regard him as a different person from Philetas of Cos, who, though sometimes called a lihodian (pro­bably on account of the close connection which subsisted between Cos and Rhodes), is never spoken of as a Samian.
www.ancientlibrary.com /smith-bio/2600.html   (880 words)

  
 DWARF - LoveToKnow Article on DWARF   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
It is certain that members of the tiny Akka race of Equatorial Africa figured at the courts of the Pharaohs of the early dynasties and were much valued.
Philetas of Cos, poet and grammarian (circa 330 B.c.), tutor of Ptolemy Philadeiphus, was alleged to be so tiny that he had to wear leaden shoes lest he should be blown away.
The Romans practised artificial dwarfing, and the Latin nanus or pumilo were terms alternatively used to describe the natural and unnatural dwarf.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /D/DW/DWARF.htm   (1309 words)

  
 Philetas Of Cos --  Encyclopædia Britannica
Philetas also spelled Philitas Greek poet and grammarian from the Aegean island of Cos, regarded as the founder of the Hellenistic school of poetry, which flourished in Alexandria after c.
More results on "Philetas Of Cos" when you join.
Greek poet and grammarian from the Aegean island of Cos, regarded as the founder of the Hellenistic school of poetry, which flourished in Alexandria after c.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9059652   (690 words)

  
 PHILETAS - Online Information article about PHILETAS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Cos, Alexandrian poet and critic, flourished in the second See also:
Philetas was also the author of a vocabulary called "AraKra, explaining the meanings of rare and obscure words, including words See also:
Bergk, Poetae lyrici graeci; see also E. Maass, De tribus Philetae carminibus (1895).
encyclopedia.jrank.org /PER_PIG/PHILETAS.html   (207 words)

  
 Theocritus, Bion and Moschus rendered into English Prose Story   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
The pupil of nature had still to be taught the 'rules' of the critics, to watch the temper and fashion of his time, and to try his fortune among the courtly poets and grammarians of the capital of civilisation.
This Philetas was a critic, a commentator on Homer, and an elegiac poet whose love-songs were greatly admired by the Romans of the Augustan age.
Cos was therefore resorted to by young students from all parts of the East, and Theocritus cannot but have made many friends of his own age.
www.richread.com /03thbm10.html   (21952 words)

  
 COS   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Search the COS Family Message Boards at Ancestry.com (if available).
Search the COS Family Resource Center at RootsWeb.com (if available).
Find graves of people named COS at Find-a-Grave.com (or add one that you know).
www.worldhistory.com /surname/US/C/COS.htm   (73 words)

  
 Index of names: Co   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Index of names: Co Index of Names: Co - the numbers at the start of each line refer to years / events; click on the links to see the details of the events.
308/4_ The birth of Ptolemaeus II, on the island of Cos.
88/43 The inhabitants of Cos surrender Alexander, the son of the Egyptian
www.attalus.org /names/Co.html   (2163 words)

  
 Fee-Alexandra Haase. Rise of Criticism between grammar, rhetoric and philosophy in ancient Alexandria.
Philetas of Cos was an Alexandrian poet and critic, flourished in the second half of the 4
The elegiac poets Callinus, Mimnermus, Philetas and Callimachus.
Philetas, the remaining member of the Alexandrian Triad, seems to have been a more simple, genial, and graceful spirit than the other two, to whom he was accordingly esteemed inferior.
www.historia.ru /2005/02/haase.htm   (7724 words)

  
 COS - OneLook Dictionary Search
COS, Cos, 'cos, c.o.s, cos, cos : Encarta® World English Dictionary, North American Edition [home, info]
Cos, cos : The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language [home, info]
COS : Dorland's Illustrated Medical Dictionary [home, info]
www.onelook.com /cgi-bin/cgiwrap/bware/dofind.cgi?word=COS   (353 words)

  
 'cos - OneLook Dictionary Search
COS : Stammtisch Beau Fleuve Acronyms [home, info]
COS : Butterfly Glossary (networking terminology) [home, info]
Phrases that include cos: cos lettuce, cos b, cos site, hippocrates of cos, philetas of cos, more...
www.onelook.com /?w='cos   (353 words)

  
 Theocritus Biography / Biography of Theocritus Main Biography
He was a native of Syracuse who was familiar with Croton and Thurii in southern Italy, the island of Cos, Miletus, and Alexandria.
His parents were Praxagoras and Philinna (who was originally from Cos).
Theocritus was a pupil of Philetas of Cos, as it is conjectured that Ptolemy Philadelphus also was.
www.bookrags.com /biography-theocritus   (232 words)

  
 J. Shaw: The Printed Dictionary in France Before 1539: A-A.1.1
Among the earliest glossographers of the Alexandrian school were the poet Philetas of Cos (c.340-284 B.C.) whose Miscellanea explains rare words in Homer, various dialects and technica, and Simias of Rhodes who compiled three books of glottai (Hunt 1991: I, 3).
Zenodotus of Ephesus (c.325-c.234 B.C.), a pupil of Philetas and the first librarian of the vast library at Alexandria, also wrote a glossary of the difficult words in Homer (Sandys 1921: I, 119f.).
The poet Callimachus of Cyrene (c.310-c.235 B.C.), collected the names of rivers, fish, winds and months (Holtz 1996: 6; Hunt 1991: I, 4) and Xenocritus and Philinus, both of Cos, compiled glossaries of medical terms (Collison 1982: 26f.).
www.chass.utoronto.ca /edicta/shaw/a.htm   (1616 words)

  
 [Phil-logic] paradox
According to the story, Philetas was so taken up with the Liar that he was unable to eat or sleep.
"O Stranger: Philetas of Cos am I 'Twas the Liar who made me die, And the bad nights caused thereby." The fact--if it's a fact--that the Liar is neither true nor false shouldn't be so bothersome, I think.
Take: "It is raining and it is not raining (at the same place, same time, same sense, etc.)." Also, as I think someone mentioned (Drake I think) English is not an inferential system; it's just a language.
philo.at /pipermail/phil-logic/2004-October/004873.html   (548 words)

  
 Abanteus
Philetas of Cos he was a major influence on Propertius who calls himself the Roman Callimachus.
The mother of Orpheus and orginally the sole Muse.
The Ionian Greek Island of Cos in the Aegean off the coast of ancient Caria, famous for its silks.
www.tkline.freeserve.co.uk /PropindexABC.htm   (5765 words)

  
 Timeline related to Greek Science and Technology 1/2
Hippocrates of Cos, also locating thought, pleasure, and pain in the brain, maintained that diseases have natural causes, and observed that head injuries led to impairments on the opposite side of the body.
Praxagoras of Cos discovers the difference between arteries and veins.
285 BC Philetas of Cos - died from considering the Liar Paradox.
www.mlahanas.de /Greeks/HistoricEvents.htm   (5116 words)

  
 Pfeiffer file#2   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
The elegy, which later flourished in Roman literature, was revived in the Hellenistic period by Philetas of Cos (d.
300), a pupil of Prax­agoras of Cos, discovered the nerves and their functions, recognized that the arteries contained blood (not air) and that their pulsations originated in the heart: thus he almost determined the circulation of the blood, the discovery of which made William Harvey (1578-1657) famous.
A third school, the empiric, was founded by Philinus of Cos, a pupil of Herophilus: stressing medical experience rather than theory, it regarded anatomy and physiology as secondary in practical therapy.
ccat.sas.upenn.edu /rs/rak/publics/notrak/Pfeiffer/part2.htm   (12112 words)

  
 Philetas of Cos   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Philetas of Cos, sometimes called Philitas, Alexandrian poet and critic, flourished in the second half of the 4th century BC.
Philetas was also the author of a vocabulary, explaining the meanings of rare and obscure words, including words peculiar to certain dialects; and of notes on Homer, severely criticized by Aristarchus.
Submit a correction or make a comment about this profile
www.nndb.com /people/850/000097559   (175 words)

  
 2. Empedocles   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
For here we have a union of two opposites, lying and truth, and their immediate contradiction; in different forms this has at all times come to pass, and has ever occupied the attention of men.
Chrysippus, a celebrated Stoic, wrote six books on the subject, and another, Philetas of Cos, died in the decline which he contracted through over-study of these paradoxes.
We have the same thing over again when, in modern times, we see men worn out by absorbing themselves in the squaring of the circle — a proposition which has well nigh become immortal.
www.marxists.org /reference/archive/hegel/works/hp/hpsocratics.htm   (9985 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-09)
Is what he says true or false?" An ancient gravestone on the Greek Island of Cos was reported by Athenaeus to contain this poem about the paradox:
O Stranger: Philetas of Cos am I, 'Twas the Liar who made me die,
Theophrastus, Aristotle's successor, wrote three papyrus rolls about the Liar Paradox, and the Stoic philosopher Chrysippus wrote six, but their contents are lost in the sands of time.
www.geocities.com /b_ahmed75/liar.html   (3121 words)

  
 The Liar Paradox as a Reductio ad Absurdum Argument
The paradox’s reputation and popularity in the beginning of the third century BC can be inferred from its being mentioned in a literary text.
One of the apocryphal stories connected with the Liar Paradox is the story of the death of the poet Philetas of Cos.
Like Philetas of Cos, therefore, who pondered what he called 'the liar argument' (pseudológov), you run the risk some day of being quite dried up, as he was, by these worries.
www.trentu.ca /ossa/p51.htm   (17753 words)

  
 Ptolemaic_Egypt
Alexandria, in Ptolemy's eyes, was to be the new home and breeding ground for the best in Greek art, science, and scholarship.
Estabilshing a new Museum and Library, "Ptolemy had to bring in Greek intellectuals from outside: there was no local talent: certainly none of the kind he wanted&emdash;on which he could draw."9 Ptolemy prepared his son for succession with the instruction of a tutor, Philetas of Cos.
Under Ptolemy I there appeared a new religious cult, that of Sarapis, which had been regarded as designed by the king to form a link between his Greek and Egyptian subjects.10 Outside the chief centers of the cult, Memphis and Alexandria, Sarapis had sadly little appeal to the Egyptians and Greek settlers.
members.tripod.com /~Kekrops/Hellenistic_Files/Ptolemaic_Egypt.html   (4174 words)

  
 Acanthis
BC) creator of severeal famous works including the Zeus of Olympia, the Athena Parthenos and Athena Promachos, and general director of the Acropolis building project under Pericles.
Philetas of Cos (5th century BC) the Greek grammarian and poet, famed for elegy.
His verses to Bittis his wife or sweetheart were especially prized.
worldebooklibrary.com /eBooks/TonyKline_Collection/Html/OvTrisExPIndexPQRSTVXZ.htm   (7304 words)

  
 The Chess Matrix Monthly
The Affair of the Avalanche Bicycle and Tyre Co. Limited by Arthur Morrison;
Small 8vo., 119pp., coffee coloured wrappers with dark havana coloured lettering, untrimmed, a presentation copy from the author to Pierre de Massot.
Dijon: Contact Publishing Co, Published by Maurice Darantiere.
chessmatrix.blogspot.com   (12521 words)

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