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Topic: Philip III of Macedon


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 Philip II of Macedon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Born in Pella, Philip was the youngest son of King Amyntas III and Queen Eurydice.
During his captivity in Thebes, Philip received a military and diplomatic education from Epaminondas, was involved in a pederastic relationship with Pelopidas and lived with Pammenes, who was an enthusiastic advocate of the Sacred Band of Thebes.
Philip was elected as leader (hegemon) of the army of invasion against the Persian Empire.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Philip_II_of_Macedon   (1216 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Born Alexander III in Pella, Macedon, he was the son of King Philip II of Macedon and Epirote princess Olympias.
Philip's assassination, although perpetrated by a disgruntled young man who had been one of Philip's lovers, is now thought to have been planned with the knowledge and possible involvement of either Alexander or Olympias, possibly both.
Philip having militarily and diplomatically established Macedonian hegemony in Greece, Alexander set off in 334 BC on his famous conquests, the first and most well known of which was the defeat and subjugation of Persia (which then controlled a large area including what are now the modern nations of Iran, Iraq, Syria and Turkey).
www.online-encyclopedia.info /encyclopedia/a/al/alexander_the_great.html   (1065 words)

  
 Philip_2 of Macedon
Philip was often passed over in twentieth century scholarship in favor of his more energetic son, Alexander, but recent archeology near Aigai (Vergina), and at other sites within ancient Macedonian territory, have revived interest in the fourth and fifth century kings, Philip in particular.
Philip was now on call to protect Thessaly, because he was their archon, and in 346 he had another chance at the Thermopylai pass.
Philip had created "an army which was perhpas the most powerful military force constructed before the coming of gunpowder."29 His son Alexander would show us the true dedication and training the army received by putting it to the ultimate test in Persia.
members.tripod.com /~Kekrops/Hellenistic_Files/Philip_2.html   (5051 words)

  
 macedon
Macedon is a historical region and former kingdom on the borders of northern Greece, from which Alexander the Great originated, and which provided the initial base for his conquests of Persia, Egypt and the northwestern borderlands of India.
Prior to Philip's conquests in the 4th century BC, the kingdom covered the southern half of the modern region of Macedonia (corresponding approximately the modern-day region of Macedonia in Greece).
In 215 BC Macedon became involved in the first of three wars with the rising power of Rome: defeat in the second (197 BC) and third (168 BC) led to the deposition of the Macedonian dynasty and the establishment of Roman client republics.
www.fact-library.com /macedon.html   (621 words)

  
 Philip II of Macedon
Philip II of Macedon (ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΣ) (382 BC - 336 BC), King of Macedon (ruled 359 BC - 336 BC), was the father of Alexander the Great (Alexander III of Macedon) and Philip III of Macedon.
Philip rebuked Pausanias because Attalus was one of his top generals and the uncle of his latest wife.
Pausanias is said to have bided his time until Philip's daughter's wedding when he was walking un-guarded and Pausanias stabbed him to death out of revenge.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Philip_II_of_Macedon   (1022 words)

  
 Knowledge King - Philip II of Macedon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Philip II (382 BC - 336 BC), King of Macedon (359 BC - 336 BC) Olympionike, was the father of Alexander the Great (Alexander III of Macedon) and Philip III of Macedon.
Coin with likeness of Philip II Born in Pella in 382 BC, he was King Amyntas III of Macedon and Queen Eurydice's youngest son, but the deaths of his elder brothers Kings Alexander II of Macedon and Perdiccas III of Macedon allowed him to take the throne in 359 BC.
His military skills and expansionist vision of Macedonian greatness brought him early success, and it was not until his armies were opposed by Athens at Thermopylae in 352 BC that he faced any serious resistance.
www.knowledgeking.net /encyclopedia/p/ph/philip_ii_of_macedon.html   (241 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Philip II of Macedon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Macedon (also sometimes known as Macedonia) was an ancient kingdom in the present-day territory of northern Greece, inhabited by Dorian Greeks.
She was married to King Amyntas III of Macedon and had four children: King Philip II of Macedon, Alexander II King of Macedon, Perdiccas III King of Macedon, and Eurynoe Princess of Macedon.
The League of Corinth was a federation of Greek states created by Philip II of Macedon during the winter of 338 BC/337 BC to facilitate his use of Greek military forces in his war against Persia.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Philip-II-of-Macedon   (3544 words)

  
 PHILIP II OF MACEDON FACTS AND INFORMATION   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Philip II of Macedon (382_BC–336_BC; Greek: ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΣ) was the King_of_Macedon from 359_BC until his death.
He was the father of Alexander_the_Great (Alexander III of Macedon) and Philip_III_of_Macedon.
Before Philip could undertake his invasion of Asia, he was assassinated, leaving the task to his son Alexander.
www.19gmarketinggroup.com /Philip_II_of_Macedon   (1017 words)

  
 Philip II of Macedon
Philip II (382 BC - 336 BC), King of Macedon (359 BC - 336 BC) Olympionike[?], was the father of Alexander the Great(Alexander III of Macedon) and Philip III of Macedon.
Having defeated an alliance of Thebans and Athenians at the battle of Chaeronea in 338 BC, he created and led the League of Corinth.
Two years later, in 336 BC, about to embark on an invasion of Persia, Philip was assassinated.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ph/Philip_of_Macedon.html   (112 words)

  
 Philip II of Macedon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Alexander III of Macedon) and III of Macedon">Philip III of Macedon.">
Philip II (382 BC - 336 BC), King of Macedon (359 BC - 336 BC) Olympionike[?], was the father of Alexander the Great(III of Macedon">Alexander III of Macedon) and III of Macedon">Philip III of Macedon.
He was roused from his dream by hearing the huntsman say in a quizzical surprise, of masterful malice, scathing him from head to foot.
www.termsdefined.net /ph/philip-ii-of-macedon.html   (372 words)

  
 Philip II of Macedon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Philip II of Macedon (Macedonia) (382 BC - 336 BC), King of Macedon (ruled 359 BC - 336 BC), was the father of Alexander the Great (Alexander III of Macedon) and Philip III of Macedon.
In 357 BC, Philip married to EpirusEpirote princess Olympias, the daughter of the king of the Molossians.
Philip rebuked Pausanias because Attalus was one of his top generalgenerals and the uncle of his latest wife.
www.infothis.com /find/Philip_II_of_Macedon   (988 words)

  
 Philip II of Macedon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Born in [[Pella]], Philip was the youngest son of [[Amyntas III of MacedonKing Amyntas III]] and [[Eurydice II of MacedonQueen Eurydice]].
During his captivity in Thebes, Philip received a military and diplomatic education from [[Epaminondas]], was involved in a [[pederastypederastic relationship]] with [[Pelopidas]] and lived with [[Pammenes]], who was an enthusiastic advocate of the [[Sacred Band of Thebes]].
Philip defeated an alliance of Thebans and Athenians at the [[Battle of Chaeronea (338 BC)Battle of Chaeronea]] in [[338 BC]].
www.19gmarketinggroup.com /repository/P/Phi/Philip_II_of_Macedon/data.xml   (1153 words)

  
 Philip of Macedon
Philip II was a hostage of the Greeks at Thebes, between 368 and 365 BC.
Philip ascended on the Macedonian throne in the most difficult times; the country was virtually at the brink of collapse, its neighbors ready to put an end to its existence.
Philip appointed himself "Commander of the Greeks", as he was already commander of the conquered Illyrians and Thracians.
www.ancientmacedonia.com /PhilipofMacedon.html   (3378 words)

  
 Amyntas III of Macedon
Amyntas III (or II), son of Arrhidaeus, great-grandson of Alexander I, was king of Macedon from 393 (or 389) to 369 BC.
He came to the throne after the ten years of confusion which followed the death of Archelaus II, the patron of art and literature, and showed the same taste for Greek culture and its representatives.
By his wife, Eurydice, he had three sons, the youngest of whom was the famous Philip of Macedon.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Amyntas_III_of_Macedon   (188 words)

  
 Philip II   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Philip II (b.1443-d.1497), surnamed the Landless, was the Duke of Savoy from 1496 to 1497.
Crosswords: Philip II English words defined with "Philip II": Battle of the Spanish Armada, Bloody Mary ♦ Invincible Armada ♦ Macedon, Macedonia, Makedonija, Mary I, Mary Tudor ♦ Spanish Armada ♦ The Armada.
Philip II O how small a portion of earth will hold us when we are dead, who ambitiously seek after the whole world while we are living.
www.websters-online-dictionary.org /PH/PHILIP+II.html   (770 words)

  
 The Rise of Philip of Macedon
Philip was thus able to deal diplomatically with three of the threats that faced him immediately upon his accession to the throne.
Philip thus seems quite interested in putting an end to the Sacred War and in 346 does so, not through a military victory, but through a diplomatic solution, the “Convention between Philip and the Phocians” by which the Phocian leaders surrendered their fortresses and departed Phocis and Boeotia.
Philip, from his first actions as the monarch of Macedon down to his death in 336, used a mixture of diplomacy and military force to achieve his ends, with an emphasis on using diplomacy when he could.
www.ancientsites.com /aw/Article/327643   (2250 words)

  
 Philip III of Macedon: Definition and Links by Encyclopedian.com - All about Philip III of Macedon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
352 BC - December 25, 317 BC), king of Macedonia(June 10, 323 BC - December 25, 317 BC), was the feeble-minded son of Philip II of Macedonia by Philinna[?] of Larissa, a Thessalian wife, and half-brother of Alexander the Great
After his brother's death in June 10, 323 BC he was chosen by the Macedonian army at Babylon to be nominal king and later this year he was joined in the throne by his nephew, the infant Alexander IV of Macedon.
Easily influenced he got involved in a series of conflicts within the Macedonian Royal Court and was eventually killed by order of Olympias (317 BC).
www.encyclopedian.com /ph/Philip-III-of-Macedon.html   (162 words)

  
 Alexander III of Macedon – the greatest of the great
At the time of his death, Philip was at the age of 47 and had many plans in mind for conquests in Asia.
Philip's army, which was favourably disposed towards Alexander, because he was attached to it from his childhood, immediately appointed twenty-year-old Alexander for a king.
Following the death of Philip, changes on the throne were also made in Persia; the old Artaxerxes Och was replaced by Darius III Codomanus, who became the ruler of that large Asian empire.
www.macedonia.co.uk /mcic/bulletinandnews/mcicbulletin/alexandergreat.htm   (1982 words)

  
 ALEXANDER THE GREAT, Project by JJP
Philip was so proud of Alexander's horsemanship that he said: O my son, seek out a kingdom worthy of thyself, for Macedonia is too little for thee.
Philip's last wife, Cleopatra had borne a daughter few days before his assassination, while Attalus, her uncle and guardian had been sent on ahead into Asia to share the command of the forces with Parmenion.
A possible rival for the throne remained Attalus; Cleopatra's (the last Philip's wife) uncle has been disaffected because of the murder of Cleopatra and her daughter, but he had not claim the throne of Macedonia, he was loyal to Philip and hostile to his assassin.
1stmuse.com /frames   (3166 words)

  
 Amyntas III of Macedon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Amyntas III (or II), son of Arrhidaeus, grandfather of Alexander I, was king of Macedon from 393 (or 389) to 369 BC.
He came to the throne after the ten years of confusion which followed the death of Archelaus II, the patron of art and literature.
By his wife, Eurydice, he had three sons, the youngest of whom was the famous Philip II of Macedon.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Amyntas_II   (177 words)

  
 Alexander III (The Great) of Macedon   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
In 338 B.C. Philip II of Macedon conquered the Greeks, two years later he was assassinated.
Alexander the Great, son of Philip II, was born in 356 B.C., tutored by Aristotle, and ruled Macedon while his father campaigned abroad.
Instability threatened to destroy Macedon after the death of Philip II and Alexander needed to stabilize the kingdom.
users2.ev1.net /~legionary/mainevent/coins/Macedon.html   (232 words)

  
 1.1.2.1 Macedonian Kingdom
The turbulent history of the Macedonian kingdom took a new turn, when in 359 bc the dynamic Philip II acceded to the throne.
Philip II Over the next century and a half the fortunes of the Macedonian kingdom varied, starting with the military exploits of Demetrios Poliorketes and ending with the defeat of Philip V at the hands of the Romans.
When Philip's son Perseus later tried to regain full independence from Rome, he was defeated (168 bc), and the Macedonian monarchy came to an end.
www.classicalcoins.com /page83.html   (147 words)

  
 Not Philip II of Macedon
The identification of the couple within the tomb as Philip II and Cleopatra, his seventh or eighth wife, made its discovery all the more exciting as no other royal burials at Vergina, site of the ancient Macedonian capital of Aigai, had escaped the ravages of looters and invaders.
During his reign (359-336 B.C.), Philip had quelled the military and political turmoil in Macedonia and conquered much of Greece, thus laying the groundwork for his son Alexander to conquer lands from Greece to India.
This is consistent with the taphonomic history of Philip III Arrhidaeus according to ancient sources.
www.archaeology.org /online/features/macedon   (1090 words)

  
 Arrhidaeus - WCD (Wiki Classical Dictionary)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
He was at Babylon at the time of Alexander's death, 323 BC, and was elected king under the name of Philip at the so-called Babylon settlement.
The young Alexander IV, the infant son of Rhoxane, who was born shortly afterwards, was associated with him in the government.
On their return to Macedon, Eurydice attempted to obtain the supreme power in opposition to Polyperchon.
www.ancientlibrary.com /wcd/Arrhidaeus   (353 words)

  
 Alexander IV of Macedon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This resulted in the nomination of Regents ruling on their behalf and a number of his father's generals, now Satraps of major provinces, gaining enough power to act independently from the crown.
Polyperchon, between 319 BC and 316 BC, an heir chosen by Antipater himself.
Olympias, Alexander's grandmother, exerted considerable influence over Polyperchon and ordered the execution of Philip III in 317 BC.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Alexander_IV_of_Macedon   (266 words)

  
 Philip of Macedon Philip II of Macedonia Biography
Philip of Macedon Philip II of Macedonia Biography
Philip provided his Macedonian solders in the phalanx with sarissa, a spear which was long 6 meters, about 18 feet.
"Philip II of Macedonia (359-336), who made his country into a major power, virtually controlling the mainland Greek city-states, intended to lead his and their forces against the two-centuries-old Persian (Achaemenid) empire, which ruled over huge territories extending from the Aegean to Egypt and central Asia.
www.historyofmacedonia.org /AncientMacedonia/PhilipofMacedon.html   (5131 words)

  
 Royalty.nu - Alexander the Great, King of Macedon
Philip's wife was Olympias, daughter of King Neoptolemus I of Epirus, which was located in what is now southern Albania and northwest Greece.
Philip's last bride had given birth to her second daughter, and Olympias is said to have had the child killed in the mother's presence before forcing the unhappy woman to hang herself.
Bloodline of Kings: A Novel of Philip of Macedon by Thomas Sundell.
www.royalty.nu /Europe/Balkan/Alexander.html   (3564 words)

  
 Alexander The Great
More than any other world conqueror, Alexander III of Macedon, or ancient Macedonia, deserves to be called the Great.
Philip was bent on the conquest of Persia.
Alexander's army and a huge force led by Darius III of Persia met at Issus in October 333 BC.
www.crystalinks.com /alexanderthegreat.html   (1252 words)

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