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Topic: Phineas Gage


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  Phineas Gage
Doctors were able to keep his wound from killing Gage, despite their lack of knowledge about bacteria and its role in infection, and they patched together his skull and face so that Gage was able to walk away from the accident seemingly unharmed.
Those who had known Gage before the accident, however, knew that despite appearances, Gage was not the same man. The damage to his brain may not have affected his ability to function physically, to talk, and to perform work, but it had forever altered his personality.
Gage’s brain injury was his legacy, and it has taught scientists much about how the mind works, in particular which functions the frontal lobes (those damaged in Gage) are responsible for.
www.be.wednet.edu /ourschools/hs/library/phineas_gage.htm   (442 words)

  
  Phineas Gage
Gage reportedly had significant changes in personality and temperament, which provided some of the first evidence that specific parts of the brain, particularly the frontal lobes, might be involved in specific psychological processes dealing with emotion, personality and problem solving.
Gage's case is cited as among the first evidence suggesting that damage to the frontal lobes could alter aspects of personality and affect socially appropriate interaction.
He sees Gage's case as playing a crucial role in the history of neuroscience, arguing that Gage's story "was the historical beginnings of the study of the biological basis of behavior".
www.mrsci.com /Neurotrauma/Phineas_Gage.php   (1439 words)

  
 Phineas Gage - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Phineas P. Gage (1823 – May 21, 1860) was a railroad construction foreman, who suffered a traumatic brain injury, caused when a tamping iron accidentally passed through his skull, damaging the frontal lobes of his brain, causing the supposed inversing of his emotional, social and personal traits—leaving him in a temperamental and unsociable state.
On September 13, 1848, Phineas Gage was working outside the small town of Cavendish, Vermont on the construction of a railroad track where he was employed as a foreman.
Gage's skull, as well as the rod that pierced it, is currently part of the permanent exhibition at Harvard Medical School's Warren Anatomical Museum in Boston, Massachusetts.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Phineas_Gage   (1425 words)

  
 Amazon.fr : An Odd Kind of Fame: Stories of Phineas Gage: Livres en anglais: Malcolm MacMillan   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Gage, a railroad construction worker, had an accident in which an iron bar was propelled through the front part of his head, producing a massive injury to his brain, presumably in his frontal lobes.
Harlow's and Bigelow's descriptions of Gage are spare, to be sure, but the gist of their conclusions has been faithfully portrayed by contemporary neuroscientists, and the prescient observations of Harlow regarding the connection of the frontal lobes to personality have been confirmed repeatedly by modern studies of patients with similar types of brain damage.
In 1848 a railway construction worker named Phineas Gage suffered an accident that made him a major curiosity of medicine and a significant figure in psychology and neuroscience: an explosion caused a tamping iron to be blown completely through his head, destroying the left frontal lobe of his brain.
www.amazon.fr /Odd-Kind-Fame-Stories-Phineas/dp/0262632594   (1126 words)

  
 Vermont History: Phineas Gage's Tamping Iron
SEPTEMBER 13, 1848: the accidental explosion of a charge Gage had just set blew his tamping iron out of the borehole and through the left side of his skull: it entered point first under this left cheek bone, exited through the top of his head and landed some 25 to 30 yards away.
Gage was knocked over but may not have lost consciousness, according to some accounts.
Gage had survived a horrendous injury; his case began to have an influence on the science of localization of brain function.
www.virtualvermont.com /history/pgage.html   (699 words)

  
 SuboxoneAssistedTreatment - 1.3 Phineas Gage
Gage and coworkers had to drill holes in the stone, put explosive in the holes, cover the explosive with sand, and then use a fuse and tamping iron to trigger an explosion.
He sees Gage's case as playing a crucial role in the history of neuroscience, arguing that Gage's story "was the historical beginnings of the study of the biological basis of behavior".
Gage kept the rod which damaged him throughout his life as a souvenir, and it was buried with him in death.
www.suboxoneassistedtreatment.org /16.html   (883 words)

  
 Phineas Gage | Scholastic.com
Phineas Gage was truly a man with a hole in his head.
Phineas, a railroad construction foreman, was blasting rock near Cavendish, Vermont, in 1848 when a thirteen-pound iron rod was shot through his brain.
Gage "was no longer Gage," said his Vermont doctor, meaning that the old Phineas was dependable and well liked, and the new Phineas was crude and unpredictable.
www2.scholastic.com /browse/book.jsp?id=3148   (247 words)

  
 Cognitive Psychology - Group Website - Background on the Brain   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Phineas Gage’s injury with an errant railroad spike has captivated the interest of the psychology field.
Gage, a foreman on a railway construction crew, lived a normal life during the mid-1800s prior to his injury.
Gage miraculously survived the severe injury, and was even conscious moments after the accident.
www.tcnj.edu /~leonard2/CogPsych212Group/brainBg.html   (979 words)

  
 Rita Carter: the workings of the brain - Phineas Gage
Gage’s job was to clear the way for the track-layers by blowing away any boulders that were too big to manhandle.
Gage had been chosen for this dangerous and important job because, of all the men, he was judged to be the most careful, sober, and responsible.
The case of Phineas Gage and the Tamping Iron has since become famous because the doctor who initially treated him subsequently made a meticulous report of both the personality changes and the precise damage to his brain.
ritacarter.co.uk /page12.htm   (990 words)

  
 Phineas Gage on Flickr - Photo Sharing!
At the time of discovery, Gage's condition led to changes in the perception of the function and compartmentalisation of the brain with regards to emotion and personality, and to the inception of methods such as pre-frontal lobotomies as methods of treating anti-social conditions.
On September 13, 1848, Phineas Gage was working outside the small town of Cavendish, Vermont on the construction of a railroad track where he was employed as a foreman.
Gage's case is cited as among the first evidence suggesting that damage to the frontal lobes could alter aspects of personality and affect socially appropriate interaction.
www.flickr.com /photos/pantufla/273272667   (1734 words)

  
 BrainConnection.com - The Strange Tale of Phineas Gage - Page 1
Gage had a combination of intelligence and athletic ability that made him perfect for the task of clearing rock from the path of the coming railroad.
Gage had drilled a hole into the rock and filled it with powder, indicating to the man helping him that it was time to put in the sand.
Gage was still conscious at the time of the exam and able to answer questions about his accident, but his survival was not yet assured.
www.brainconnection.com /topics/?main=fa/phineas-gage   (741 words)

  
 Phineas Gage - Associated Content
Phineas Gage was a railroad worker who encountered a life changing accident for himself and for medical history.
Gage went back to work in 1849 and it was then that his coworkers commented that he was no longer himself.
Gage became of interest to doctors because not much more than the physical aspect of the brain was studied and only the basics of brain stem injury were known.
www.associatedcontent.com /article/831073/phineas_gage.html   (527 words)

  
 Amazon.com: An Odd Kind of Fame: Stories of Phineas Gage: Malcolm Macmillan: Books
Gage, a railroad construction worker, had an accident in which an iron bar was propelled through the front part of his head, producing a massive injury to his brain, presumably in his frontal lobes.
In retrospect, Gage's dramatic case was a clue to the critical role of frontal-lobe structures in social behavior and moral reasoning.
Harlow's and Bigelow's descriptions of Gage are spare, to be sure, but the gist of their conclusions has been faithfully portrayed by contemporary neuroscientists, and the prescient observations of Harlow regarding the connection of the frontal lobes to personality have been confirmed repeatedly by modern studies of patients with similar types of brain damage.
www.amazon.com /Odd-Kind-Fame-Stories-Phineas/dp/0262133636   (1195 words)

  
 Countway Medical Library - Records Management - Image of the Month, April 2000   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The story of Phineas Gage illustrates some of the first medical knowledge gained on the relationship between personality and the functioning of the frontal lobe.
A well-liked and successful construction foreman, Phineas Gage was contracted to work on the bed preparation for the Rutland and Burlington Railroad in Cavendish, Vermont in late 1840's.
Despite his torn scalp and fractured skull, Gage remained lucid and rational during the ride and was able to speak with his attending physician, Dr. John Martyn Harlow.
www.countway.med.harvard.edu /archives/iotm/iotm_2000-04.shtml?thematic   (503 words)

  
 Powell's Books - Phineas Gage: A Gruesome But True Story about Brain Science by
Phineas Gage was truly a man with a hole in his head.
Phineas, a railroad construction foreman, was blasting rock near Cavendish, Vermont, in 1848 when a thirteen-pound iron rod was shot through his brain.
Gage "was no longer Gage, " said his Vermont doctor, meaning that the old Phineas was dependable and well liked, and the new Phineas was crude and unpredictable.
www.powells.com /cgi-bin/biblio?inkey=1-0618052526-2   (253 words)

  
 Harvard Gazette: Beyond Phineas Gage
Headlining at the hall of human horrors is the "crowbar skull" of New Hampshire construction foreman Phineas Gage.
Gage, by far the Warren's most famous exhibit, won this dubious notoriety working on the Rutland & Burlington Railroad in Cavendish, Vt., when, in September of 1848, an accidental explosion fired a 13-pound tamping iron through his head.
Gage's accident turned the focus toward the physiology of the brain.
www.news.harvard.edu /gazette/2001/11.29/14-warren.html   (887 words)

  
 Harvard Gazette: Beyond Phineas Gage
Headlining at the hall of human horrors is the "crowbar skull" of New Hampshire construction foreman Phineas Gage.
Gage, by far the Warren's most famous exhibit, won this dubious notoriety working on the Rutland & Burlington Railroad in Cavendish, Vt., when, in September of 1848, an accidental explosion fired a 13-pound tamping iron through his head.
Gage's accident turned the focus toward the physiology of the brain.
www.hno.harvard.edu /gazette/2001/11.29/14-warren.html   (887 words)

  
 Mind Hacks: Phineas Gage and the rod of iron
The Neurophilosopher has written a great introduction to the history and science of Phineas Gage - one of the most famous cases in the history of neurology.
In 1848, Gage was a railroad worker who had the sort of job that sounds like it was designed for the Darwin awards: he was paid to drill holes in large rocks, fill them with gunpowder and pack it down with a large iron rod.
Gage seemed to show some changes in character (although the exactly details are still somewhat controversial), and this was one of the first clues that specific areas of the brain may be involved in specific mental functions.
www.mindhacks.com /blog/2006/12/phineas_gage_and_the.html   (261 words)

  
 Phineas Gage - Psychology Wiki
Phineas P. Gage (1823 – May 21, 1860) was a railroad construction worker who suffered an unusual kind of traumatic brain injury which inflicted severe damage to parts of the frontal lobes of his brain during a work accident.
Gage reportedly had significant changes in personality and temperament, which provided some of the first evidence that specific parts of the brain, particularly the frontal lobes, might be involved in specific psychological processes dealing with emotion, personality and problem solving.
Gage's skull, as well as the rod that pierced it, is currently part of the permanent exhibition at Harvard Medical School's Warren Anatomical Museum in Boston, Massachusetts.
psychology.wikia.com /wiki/Phineas_Gage   (1428 words)

  
 The Phineas Gage Story
Phineas Gage stood five feet six inches tall, weighed 150 pounds, and was 25 years old at the time of the incident.
Phineas apparently tried to regain his job as a railroad foreman, but his erratic behavior and altered personality made it impossible to do so.
Although an autopsy was not performed, Phineas' relatives agreed to donate his skull and the iron rod (which Phineas carried with him almost daily after the accident) to the Museum of the Medical Department of Harvard University.
cwx.prenhall.com /bookbind/pubbooks/morris2/chapter2/medialib/lecture/gage.html   (609 words)

  
 Phineas Gage Retrospettiva - Versione Corta
Slide 6: The accident #1 Gage dropped the tamping iron while distracted by his men, with his head turned towards them #2 Powder and fuse were in, and Gage was waiting for an assistant to pour the sand in the hole.
Slide 16: The treatment •Gage was in a semirecumbent position; •bone fragments got removed from inside the skull; •several pieces from the skull were reunited and applied with dressings; •the wound was kept clean and disinfected very often; •purging and blood letting “favourably influenced the outcome”.
Gage was first counted against Broca localization of speech, then dr. Hammond (1871) noted that the third frontal convolution [...] escaped all injury.
www.slideshare.net /ATMB/phineas-gage-retrospettiva-versione-corta   (1393 words)

  
 Phineas Gage
Phineas' thirteen pound steel tamping iron was thrown upward by the explosion and shot through his head.
Phineas was rushed to town where physicians treated him as capably as they could.
However, as his doctor noted, Phineas Gage was "no longer Gage." Phineas' demeanor and attitude toward others had changed from one of cordiality to one of abuse.
www.bv229.k12.ks.us /BVcurriculum/commarts/books/7th/book_phineas_gage.html   (257 words)

  
 Phineas Gage
Phineas Gage was the foreman of a railway construction gang working for the contractors preparing the bed for the Rutland and Burlington Railroad near Cavendish, Vermont.
Phineas was knocked over but may not have lost consciousness even though most of the front part of the left side of his brain was destroyed.
According to Dr. Harlow, Phineas appeared at Barnum’s Museum in New York, worked in the livery stable of the Dartmouth Inn (Hanover, NH), and drove coaches and cared for horses in Chile.
shs.westport.k12.ct.us /avery/Psychology/phineas_gage.htm   (529 words)

  
 neuro
One of the topics discussed, which some of you may have heard before, was the interesting story of Phineas Gage.
Gage was foreman for the Rutland Burlington Rail Road in 1848.
Phineas Gage's story is amazing and mysterious and this is really the first time that the world of Neurobiology had ever considered the brain as a part of the body that does more than just make us walk and talk, but as a part that also directs more complex behavior (such as reasoning).
pharyngula.org /index/neuro/phineas_gages_resilient_frontal_lobe   (305 words)

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