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Topic: Phoenix (mythology)


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In the News (Wed 17 Jul 19)

  
  The Phoenix, Greek Mythology Link - www.maicar.com
The Phoenix is a fabulous and sacred bird.
It is from the pictures that they have described the Phoenix, saying that it had the appearance of an eagle, both in shape and size, and that his plumage was partly golden, and partly red.
Phoenix 1, brother of Europa or perhaps her father, was son either of Agenor 1 or of Belus 1; these two descend from Libya, daughter of Epaphus 1, son of Io.
homepage.mac.com /cparada/GML/PhoenixTheBird.html   (1120 words)

  
  Phoenix (mythology) - New World Encyclopedia
The new phoenix embalmed the ashes of the old phoenix in an egg made of myrrh and deposited it in the Egyptian city of Heliopolis ("the city of the sun" in Greek).
The phoenix became a symbol of Christianity in early literature, either from ancient Hebrew legend regarding a phoenix in the Garden of Eden, or from the incorporation of Greek and Roman culture, or from a combination of both.
Elizabeth I used the phoenix as a royal badge, while some cities in Europe use the phoenix in their municipal emblem to denote the one-time destruction and consequent rebuilding of the city, connecting to the image of resurrection inherent in the phoenix.
www.newworldencyclopedia.org /entry/Phoenix_(mythology)   (1741 words)

  
 SyncOne.net - Permalink Display
In ancient Egyptian mythology and in myths derived from it, the phoenix is a mythical sacred firebird.
At the end of its life-cycle the phoenix builds itself a nest of cinnamon twigs that it then ignites; both nest and bird burn fiercely and are reduced to ashes, from which a new, young phoenix arises.
The new phoenix embalms the ashes of the old phoenix in an egg made of myrrh and deposits it in Heliopolis ("the city of the sun" in Greek), located in Egypt.
www.syncone.net /cmd/ShowClip/a597d70a71a041af9a450f7329e5defe.aspx   (138 words)

  
 Phoenix - Greek Mythology - Ancinet-Mythology.com
From it's ashes, a new phoenix is born.
The Phoenix is a symbol of rebirth, ressurection or renewal in many mythologies.
The Phoenix in Chinese mythology is known as Feng.
www.ancient-mythology.com /greek/phoenix.php   (45 words)

  
  Phoenix (mythology) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
In ancient Egyptian mythology and in myths derived from it, the phoenix or phœnix is a mythical sacred firebird.
The new phoenix embalms the ashes of the old phoenix in an egg made of myrrh and deposits it in the Egyptian city of Heliopolis ("the city of the sun" in Greek).
The Phoenix and the silhouette of the soldier bearing a bayonet rifle was the emblem of the Junta.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Phoenix_(mythology)   (3945 words)

  
 Phoenix (mythology)
The Phoenix is a mythical bird, sacred in ancient Egypt.
The new phoenix would embalm the ashes in an egg made of myrrh and deposit it in Heliopolis ("the city of the sun" in Greek).
The phoenix also appears in other mythologies; although descriptions (and life-span) varied, the phoenix became popular in early Christian art and literature as a symbol of the resurrection, of immortality and of life-after-death.
www.ebroadcast.com.au /lookup/encyclopedia/ph/Phoinix.html   (213 words)

  
 PHOENIX : Fantastic Arabian bird ; Greek legend ; pictures : PHOINIX
The Phoenix was a popular creature in Greek and Roman literature, and later occurs in Medieval bestiaries.
For this purpose Phoenix was believed to come fror Arabia, and to make lan egg of myrrh as large as possible; this egg he then hollowved out and put into it his father, closing it up carefully, and the egg was believed then to be of exactly the same weight as before.
Now the Phoenix’s bright eye grows dim and the pupil becomes palsied by the frost of years, like the moon when she is shrouded in clouds and her horn beings to vanish in the mist.
www.theoi.com /Thaumasios/Phoinix.html   (1960 words)

  
 Phoenix Rising: Mythical Creature, Phoenix Bird Mythology, Myth Beast
The phoenix was also compared to undying Rome, and it appears on the coinage of the late Roman Empire as a symbol of the Eternal City.
The Chinese phoenix was thought to have the beak of a cock, the face of a swallow, the neck of a snake, the breast of a goose, the back of a tortoise, hindquarters of a stag and the tail of a fish.
The Ho-Oo is the Japanese phoenix, the Ho being the male bird and the Oo being the female.
www.mythicalrealm.com /creatures/phoenix.html   (1301 words)

  
 Phoenix, etymology, mythology, and symbolism of the constellation
Phoenix, etymology, mythology, and symbolism of the constellation
The Phoenix is often referred to as the firebird, and is the constructor of a funeral pyre, from the Indo-European root *paewr- 'Fire';.
The city of Phoenix in Arizona was so named because it was reborn out of the ancient remains of the Hohokam Indian people, who once populated the land around 300 B.C - 1450 A.D. Western Apaches referred to the area as 'Fiinigis' [2].
www.constellationsofwords.com /Constellations/Phoenix.html   (978 words)

  
 Phoenix - Conservapedia
The myth of the Phoenix is an example of the powerful theme of rebirth, so popular in mythology, which can be seen (especially in Egyptian mythology) in the tale of Isis and Osiris.
Despite its Egyptian origin, the phoenix appears in some early Christian art as a symbolic representation of Christ much as a dragon is used as the symbolic representation of Satan.
The myth of the phoenix is familiar to schoolchildren throughout the world as a pivotal sub-character in the Harry Potter series, as a companion to Albus Dumbledore.
www.conservapedia.com /Phoenix   (231 words)

  
 Phoenix Benu - Crystalinks
In ancient Egyptian mythology and in myths derived from it, the Phoenix is a female mythical sacred firebird with beautiful gold and red plumage.
Said to live for 500 or 1461 years (depending on the source), at the end of its life-cycle the phoenix builds itself a nest of cinnamon twigs that it then ignites; both nest and bird burn fiercely and are reduced to ashes, from which a new, young phoenix arises.
Originally, the phoenix was identified by the Egyptians as a stork or heron-like bird called a bennu, known from the Book of the Dead and other Egyptian texts as one of the sacred symbols of worship at Heliopolis, closely associated with the rising sun and the Egyptian sun-god Ra.
www.crystalinks.com /phoenix.html   (873 words)

  
 deviantART Shop: Phoenix
The Phoenix is a large bird that is revered around the world as a symbol of immortality and re-incarnation.
In another sense, the Phoenix is the Cherub or Angel (in Israel), the clapping of whose wings simulates the roar of thunder.
Some astrologers consider the Phoenix as a higher form of the eagle, one of the symbols of the constellation Scorpio, appropriate given the death and rebirth connotations of the zodiacal sign.
www.deviantart.com /print/2820486   (654 words)

  
 Phoenix Building Systems - Mythology
The phoenix is a long lived bird, which dies by self-immolation with a new phoenix arising from the ashes after three days.
The phoenix buried the ball at the temple of the sun at Heliopolis.
The Ho is the male phoenix, the Oo, the female.
www.phoenixbldg.com /myth.html   (318 words)

  
 Universal Phoenix
When the phoenix feel sits death approaching (every 500 or 1461 years) it builds a nest, sets it on fire, and is consumed by the flames.
Eventually, she persuaded all the animals except the phoenix to share in her fallen state by eating from the forbidden tree.
The legendary phoenix was a symbol of high virtue and grace to the Chinese.
monsters.monstrous.com /universal_phoenix.htm   (846 words)

  
 Phoenix
Originally, the phoenix was identified by the Egyptians as a stork or heron-like bird called a benu, known from the Book of the Dead and other Egyptian texts as one of the sacred symbols of worship at Heliopolis, closely associated with the rising sun and the Egyptian sun-god Ra.
The Phoenix and the silhouette of the soldier bearing a bayonet rifle was the emblem of the Junta.
The phoenix featured in the flags of Alexander Ypsilantis and of many other captains during the Greek Revolution, symbolizing Greece's rebirth, and was chosen by John Capodistria as the first Coat of Arms of the Greek State (1828-1832).
www.mlahanas.de /Greeks/Mythology/Phoenix.html   (749 words)

  
 Phoenix, mythology, history, characteristics and observations by telescope.
In Egyptian mythology, the bird fenix represented the Sun, that dies at night and appears again in the morning.
The constellation of Phoenix or Fenix was described by German astronomer Johann Bayer in 1603.
The constellation of Phoenix I located it from the locality of Son Serra de Marina (Majorca, Spain) the 21 of October of 1989 at the age of 23 years.
www.mallorcaweb.net /masm/Phe1.htm   (521 words)

  
 Phoenix, or Ho-oo, in China and Asia
An interesting difference between the way the dragon and the phoenix are shown in decorations is that the dragon is used to fill all the space available on a vase for example, while the phoenix is used to fill specific space in the decoration such as around trees, rocks, and flowers.
A common depiction was of the phoenix shown with spread wings, often in the act of attacking snakes with its strong talons.
In Chinese mythology, the phoenix is represented by the Feng-huang which personifies the primordial force of the heavens.
www.onmarkproductions.com /html/phoenix-china-popup.html   (986 words)

  
 Phoenix, the
In ancient Greek and Egyptian mythology, the phoenix is a mythical bird associated with the Egyptian sun god Ra and the Greek god Phoibos Apollo.
According to the Egyptians, the phoenix was as large as an eagle or as a peacock, with brilliant plumage and a melodious cry.
Upon sensing its approaching death, the phoenix would build a nest of aromatic wood, set it on fire, and allow itself to be consumed by the flames.
www.deathreference.com /Nu-Pu/Phoenix-the.html   (290 words)

  
 The Mythical Phoenix
The phoenix is said to have red and purple plumage (hence the name Phoenix, which comes from the Greek word for purple), although is has also been said to be gold or all the colors of the rainbow.
The phoenix is a symbol of the sun, and every morning, Apollo, the sun god, would stop his chariot to listen to the phoenix singing as it bathed itself.
This phoenix puts the ashes in an egg and carries it to Heliopolis, the city of the sun in Egypt, where it leaves the egg on the altar of the sun god, Re.
www.nyctophilia.net /phoenix   (304 words)

  
 Phoenix
In Chinese mythology, the Phoenix is represented by the feng-huang, a bird that symbolizes the union of yin and yang.
The legendary Phoenix was a symbol of high virtue and grace to the Chinese.  The Phoenix, representing power and prosperity, reflected the empress, and only she was allowed wear its symbol.  The "Phuong" is the male Phoenix and the "Hoang" is the female.
In ancient Greek mythology, the Phoenis is a mythological bird encrested with flames and thought yo be the servent of the sun god.
www.geocities.com /fsmauri21/Phoenix.html   (642 words)

  
 phoenix - Search Results - MSN Encarta
Phoenix (city, Arizona), capital city of Arizona and seat of Maricopa County, located on the Salt River in the south central part of the state....
Phoenix (mythology), legendary bird that lived in Arabia.
- mythological bird: in ancient mythology, a bird resembling an eagle that lived for 500 years and then burned itself to death on a pyre from whose ashes another phoenix arose.
encarta.msn.com /phoenix.html   (286 words)

  
 Online Encyclopedia and Dictionary - Fenghuang
The males are called Feng and the females the Huang; in modern times, however, such a distinction of gender is sometimes blurred into a single female entity, as the bird is often paired with the Chinese dragon which has male connotations.
The fenghuang is said to be made up of the beak of a cock, the face of a swallow, the forehead of a fowl, the neck of a snake, the breast of a goose, the back of a tortoise, the hindquarters of a stag and the tail of a fish.
This is because the Chinese considered the dragon and phoenix symbolic of blissful relations between husband and wife.
www.fact-archive.com /encyclopedia/Fenghuang   (214 words)

  
 Phoenix
In ancient Greek and Egyptian mythology, the phoenix is a mythical bird and associated with the Egyptian sun-god Re and the Greek Phoibos (Apollo).
It is associated with the Egyptian Benu, the Garuda of the Hindus, and the Chinese Feng-huang.
Judaic lore mentions that the phoenix achieved its unique status as an immortal bird because it refrained from bothering the overburdened Noah during the Flood voyage (Sanh.
www.pantheon.org /mythica/articles/p/phoenix.html   (243 words)

  
 BBC - h2g2 - The Phoenix
In ancient Egyptian mythology, the phoenix was a large and magical bird with red and gold plumage which was usually depicted in a heron-like form.
Although the legend of the phoenix began in Egypt, its influence spread throughout the ancient world and references to similar creatures are found in Chinese, Arabic and Greek history.
The explanation favoured by orthodox Egyptologists is that the phoenix represented the Sun, rising and setting in a continual cycle.
www.bbc.co.uk /dna/h2g2/A442711   (484 words)

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