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Topic: Pierre de Fermat


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  Pierre de Fermat
Pierre de Fermat (August 20, 1601 – January 12, 1665) was a French lawyer at the Parlement of Toulouse, southern France, and a mathematician who is given credit for the development of modern calculus.
Fermat was only interested in integer solutions to his diophantine equations and he looked for all solutions of the equation.
Fermat was born at Beaumont-de-Lomagne, 58 kilometers (36 miles) north-west of Toulouse, France.
www.brainyencyclopedia.com /encyclopedia/p/pi/pierre_de_fermat.html   (660 words)

  
  Pierre de Fermat - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Pierre de Fermat (August 17, 1601 – January 12, 1665) was a French lawyer at the Parlement of Toulouse, southern France, and a mathematician who is given credit for the development of modern calculus.
Fermat was only interested in integer solutions to his diophantine equations and he looked for all solutions of the equation.
Fermat was born at Beaumont-de-Lomagne, 58 kilometers (36 miles) north-west of Toulouse, France.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Pierre_de_Fermat   (592 words)

  
 Pierre De Fermat - LoveToKnow 1911   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
PIERRE DE FERMAT (1601-1665), French mathematician, was born on the 17th of August 1601, at Beaumont-de-Lomagne near Montauban.
Fermat's Theorem, if p is prime and a is prime to p then a p-1 -1 is divisible by p, was first given in a letter of 1640.
Fermat was for some time councillor for the parliament of Toulouse, and in the discharge of the duties of that office he was distinguished both for legal knowledge and for strict integrity of conduct.
www.1911encyclopedia.org /Pierre_De_Fermat   (557 words)

  
 Pierre de Fermat
Pierre de Fermat (August 17, 1601 – January 12, 1665) was a French lawyer at the Parliament of Toulouse and a mathematician who is given credit for the development of modern calculus.
Fermat worked on number theory while preparing an edition of Diophantus, and the notes and comments thereon contained the numerous theorems of considerable elegance necessary to develop the theory of numbers.
Fermat is famous for his "Enigma" that was an extension of Pythagorean Theorem, also known as Fermat's last theorem, which baffled mathematicians for more than 300 years, and was only finally proven in 1995.
www.xasa.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/p/pi/pierre_de_fermat.html   (330 words)

  
 Pierre de Fermat (1601 - 1665)
Fermat also obtained the areas of parabolas and hyperbolas of any order, and determined the centres of mass of a few simple laminae and of a paraboloid of revolution.
Fermat's solution depends on the theory of combinations, and will be sufficiently illustrated by the following example, the substance of which is taken from a letter dated August 24, 1654, which occurs in the correspondence with Pascal.
Fermat does not seem to have carried the matter much further, but his correspondence with Pascal shows that his views on the fundamental principles of the subject were accurate: those of Pascal were not altogether correct.
www.maths.tcd.ie /pub/HistMath/People/Fermat/RouseBall/RB_Fermat.html   (2633 words)

  
 Fermat's Last Theorem - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Fermat's Last Theorem is one of the most famous theorems in the history of mathematics.
The 17th-century mathematician Pierre de Fermat wrote in 1637 in his copy of Claude-Gaspar Bachet's translation of the famous Arithmetica of Diophantus: "I have a truly marvelous proof of this proposition which this margin is too narrow to contain." (Original Latin: "Cuius rei demonstrationem mirabilem sane detexi.
Fermat's Last Theorem is a generalisation of this result to higher powers n, and states that no such solution exists when the exponent 2 is replaced by a larger integer.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Fermats_Last_Theorem   (2303 words)

  
 PIERRE DE FERMAT   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Pierre de Fermat était un juriste et mathématicien français ("le prince des amateurs"), né le 20 août 1601, près de Montauban, et décédé le 12 janvier 1665 à Castres.
Auteur de plusieurs théorèmes ou conjectures dans ce domaine, il est au coeur de la "théorie moderne des nombres".
Fermat est par ailleurs l'inventeur d'une méthode de démonstration, la descente infinie.
www.planete-virtuelle.org /encyclopedia/P/Pierre_de_Fermat   (276 words)

  
 Fermat, Pierre de
Pierre de Fermat was one of the most brilliant and productive mathematicians of his time, making many contributions to the differential and integral calculus, number theory, optics, and analytic geometry, as well as initiating the development of probability theory in correspondence with Pascal.
Pierre de Fermat was born on August 17, 1601 in Beaumont-de-Lomagne, France, and died on January 12, 1665 in Castres.
Fermat described his method of infinite descent, also known as "reverse induction" (Mahoney, page 231), and gave an example on how it could be used to prove that ever y prime of the form 4k+1 could be written as the sum of two squares.
www.math.rutgers.edu /courses/436/436-s00/Papers2000/pellegrino.html   (3192 words)

  
 Who was Fermat
Pierre de Fermat is one of the top ten greatest mathematicians in history.
By the way, Fermat lived in the 17th century near Toulouse in southwest France, and his day job was as a judge dealing with some of the nastiest cases imaginable, including the condemnation of priests to be burned at the stake.
Fermat wrote several other notes, saying things like 'I can prove such and such but I have to feed the cat', or 'I can solve a particular equation but I have to wash my hair', and all of these notes were discovered after his death.
www.simonsingh.net /Pierre_de_Fermat.html   (497 words)

  
 Fermat
Pierre de Fermat was born on August 17, 1601 in Beaumont-de-Lomagne near Toulouse in France.
In 1648 Pierre de Fermat became Councillor of king Louis XIV in the Parliament of Toulouse.
Pierre de Fermat will be best remembered for his work in number theory, in particular for his Last Theorem which has been (and will be ?) the source of mystery and discussion since the publishing(1670) of his marginal notes.
mathsforeurope.digibel.be /fermat.htm   (1030 words)

  
 Philosophers : Pierre de Fermat   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Pierre Fermat's father was a wealthy leather merchant and second consul of Beaumont- de- Lomagne.
Fermat received a copy of Descartes' "La Dioptrique" from mathematician Beaugrand, but paid it little attention since he was in the middle of a correspondence with Roberval and Etienne Pascal over methods of integration and using them to find centers of gravity.
He wrote to Fermat praising his work on determining the tangent to a cycloid (which is indeed correct), meanwhile writing to Mersenne claiming that it was incorrect and calling Fermat an inadequate mathematician and a thinker.
www.trincoll.edu /depts/phil/philo/phils/fermat.html   (1230 words)

  
 Fermat's Last Theorem
Pierre de Fermat was born in Beaumont-de-Lomagne, France on the 17th of August 1601 and died on the 12th of January 1665 in Castres, France.
Fermat's father was a wealthy leather merchant and second consul of Beaumont-de-Lomagne and his mother's family was in the legal profession.
Pierre had a brother and two sisters and was almost certainly brought up in the town of his birth.
www.bath.ac.uk /~jjk20/fermat/fermat.htm   (505 words)

  
 [No title]
Pierre de Fermat was born in 1601 and died in 1665.
Fermat's most famous result, his so-called "Last Theorem," was found written in the margin of his copy of Diophantus' "Arithmetica." He wrote that he had a proof of the theorem, but the proof was not found in his effects.
Fermat recognized the need for synthesis, but he would often give an analysis of a theorem, and then state that it could easily be converted to a synthesis.
www.mcs.csuhayward.edu /~malek/Mathlinks/Fermat.html   (926 words)

  
 Free Essays on Pierre De Fermat
Pierre de Fermat Pierre de Fermat was born in the year 1601 in Beaumont-de-Lomages, France.
Pierre de Fermat, like many mathematicians of the early 17th century, found solutions to the four major problems that created a form of math called calculus.
Fermat was a good scholar, and amused himself by restoring the work of Apollonius on plane loci.
www.123student.com /5052.htm   (893 words)

  
 Fermat
Pierre de Fermat: Well my disputes with Fernicle, Wallis and others rarely got passed an assertation and counterassertation of theorems or a basic disagreement over what number theory was or should be, or whether it was worth doing at all.
Pierre de Fermat: The manuscripts I wrote were full of details about my mathematical breakthroughs; how I helped create the calculus, made great strides in analytical geometry, and founded probability and the modern number theory.
Pierre de Fermat: Well I have discovered a truly marvelous demonstration to prove my theorem; however the word limit for this interview is much too small for me to explain it all to you now.
www.3villagecsd.k12.ny.us /wmhs/Departments/Math/OBrien/fermat.html   (892 words)

  
 Pierre de Fermat
Pierre de Fermat was born on August 17, 1960, in Beaumont-de-Lomagne, a small town near Toulouse in the south part of France, near the border with Spain.
Fermat's choice of a legal career was natural and typical of his time, for his father's wealth and his mother's famil y background.
"From this principle Fermat deduced the familiar laws of reflection and refraction: the angle of reflection; the sine of the angle of incidence(in refraction)is a constant number times the sine of the angle of refraction in passing from one medium to anot her." (Bell, p.63).
www.math.rutgers.edu /~cherlin/History/Papers1999/chellani.html   (1446 words)

  
 Fermat   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Pierre de Fermat (pronounced Fer-mah') was born in southwestern France in 1601.
By the time he was 30, Pierre was a civil servant whose job was to act as a link between petitioners from Toulouse to the King of France and an enforcer of royal decrees from the King to the local people.
Fermat himself was secretive and, since he rarely wrote complete proofs or explanations of how he got his answers, was mischievously frustrating for others to understand.
www.math.wichita.edu /history/men/fermat.html   (389 words)

  
 Fermat   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Fermat's correspondence with the Paris mathematicians restarted in 1654 when Blaise Pascal, Etienne Pascal's son, wrote to him to ask for confirmation about his ideas on probability.
Fermat posed further problems, namely that the sum of two cubes cannot be a cube (a special case of Fermat's Last Theorem which may indicate that by this time Fermat realised that his proof of the general result was incorrect), that there are exactly two integer solutions of x
Fermat described his method of infinite descent and gave an example on how it could be used to prove that every number of the form 4k+1 could be written as the sum of two squares.
members.tripod.com /sfabel/mathematik/database/Fermat.html   (2471 words)

  
 Pierre Fermat - Uncyclopedia
Pierre Fermat (1812-1988) was born in Anchorage, Alaska as a result of the Great Orgy of 1811.
According to local legend, Pierre is said to have "sprung from his father's head" along with the legendary Zeus, Mercury, and Pee Wee Herman.
Fermat's Last Theorem states that the ratio of beer nuts you can eat is directly proportional to the sum of their parts.
uncyclopedia.org /wiki/Pierre_Fermat   (622 words)

  
 [No title]
So by 1631 Fermat was a lawyer and government official in Toulouse and because of the office he now held he became entitled to change his name from Pierre Fermat to Pierre de Fermat.
Fermat however, feeling his isolation and still wanting to adopt his old style of challenging mathematicians, tried to change the topic from probability to number theory.
Fermat described his method of infinite descent and gave an example on how it could be used to prove that every prime of the form 4k + 1 could be written as the sum of two squares.
members.lycos.co.uk /lesparkin/fermat.htm   (2315 words)

  
 contributions of pierre de fermat   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Pierre de Fermat was born in 1601 in the French town of Beaumont-de...
Pierre de Fermat (1601-1665) Pierre de Fermat (1601-1665) This is a biographical sketch of Pierre de Fermat.
Pierre de Fermat was a lawyer by occupation, but possessed one of the greatest mathematical minds of the seventeenth century.
www.money-smash.com /articles/119/contributions-of-pierre-de-fermat.html   (870 words)

  
 Fermat
Fermat, a French mathematician of the 17th century, is known as the founder of modern number theory.
Pierre de Fermat was born on August 17, 1601 in Beaumont-de Lomagne, France.
Fermat was also one of the few mathematicians who disproved Descartes idea that the precise determination of the length of algebraic curves was impossible.
www.andrews.edu /~calkins/math/biograph/199900/biofermt.htm   (1373 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Pierre de Fermat (Mathematics, Biography) - Encyclopedia
A magistrate whose avocation was mathematics, Fermat is known as a founder of modern number theory and probability theory.
He also did much to establish coordinate geometry (see Cartesian coordinates) and invented a number of methods for determining maxima and minima that were later of use to Newton in applying the calculus.
In optics Fermat recognized that of all possible paths, light takes the path that takes the least time; this fundamental rule is known as Fermat's principle.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/F/Fermat-P.html   (343 words)

  
 The Prime Glossary: Fermat, Pierre de
Pierre de Fermat (1601-1665) is often called the "Prince of Amateurs." He was the son of a prosperous leather merchant, and became a lawyer and magistrate.
Fermat was one of the founders of analytic geometry, establish probability theory with Pascal, and helped lay the foundation for calculus.
(These are now known as the Fermat numbers.) Fermat developed a method of factoring based on expressing a number as a difference of squares and was known for his love of the method of "infinite descent" to solve problems.
primes.utm.edu /glossary/page.php?sort=Fermat   (129 words)

  
 Math Forum: Pierre de Fermat (Chameleon Graphing: Plane History)
Pierre de Fermat was born on August 17, 1601, in southern France.
One of Fermat's projects was an attempt to reconstruct Apollonius' book on plane loci, which was lost sometime during the Middle Ages.
Fermat's equation is "D in A aequetur B in E".
mathforum.org /cgraph/history/fermat.html   (420 words)

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