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Topic: Pituitary gland


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In the News (Tue 16 Jul 19)

  
  Pituitary gland disorders
Hypopituitarism is a condition that affects the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland.
Pituitary gigantism due to growth hormone excess is the single condition which accounts for nearly all cases of pathologic extreme height.
Pituitary tumors are abnormal growths on the pituitary gland.
endocrine-disorders.health-cares.net /pituitary-gland-disorders.php   (329 words)

  
  Reference.com/Encyclopedia/Pituitary gland
The pituitary gland, or hypophysis, is an endocrine gland about the size of a pea that sits in a small, bony cavity (sella turcica) covered by a dural fold (sellar diaphragm) at the base of the brain.
The pituitary fossa, in which the pituitary gland sits, is situated in the sphenoid bone in the middle cranial fossa at the base of the brain.
The anterior lobe is derived from the oral ectoderm and is composed of glandular epithelium.
www.reference.com /browse/wiki/Pituitary   (633 words)

  
 pituitary gland - Encyclopedia.com
pituitary gland small oval endocrine gland that lies at the base of the brain.
It is structurally continuous with the hypothalamus of the brain, to which it remains attached by the hypophyseal, or pituitary, stalk.
Surgical exploration of the pituitary gland by the transsphenoidal route...
www.encyclopedia.com /doc/1E1-pituitar.html   (1439 words)

  
  Pituitary Gland - MSN Encarta
The pituitary gland is located behind a small hollow in the centre of the skull known as the sella turcica, which lies below the optic chiasma (where the optic nerves cross).
In the embryo, the anterior lobe of the pituitary is of ectodermal origin and is formed from the same tissue as the roof of the mouth, whereas the posterior lobe is formed from the embryonic nervous tissue, which forms the part of the brain called the diencephalon.
Half of the cells in the anterior pituitary are somatotrophs, which produce growth hormone under the influence of somatostatin from the hypothalamus.
uk.encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761554553/Pituitary_Gland.html   (521 words)

  
  Pituitary gland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Located at the base of the skull, the pituitary gland is protected by a bony structure called the sella turcica.
The pituitary gland, or hypophysis, is an endocrine gland about the size of a pea that sits in the small, bony cavity (sella turcica) at the base of the brain.
The pituitary gland is physically attached to the brain by the pituitary, or hypophyseal stalk connected with the median eminence.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Pituitary_gland   (547 words)

  
 Pituitary gland Summary
The pituitary gland, or hypophysis cerebri, is a smallendocrine gland, measuring approximately 1.3 cm (0.5 in), and is situated at the base of the brain, cradled in a fossa of the sphenoid bone.
The pituitary gland, or hypophysis, is an endocrine gland about the size of a pea that sits in the small, bony cavity (sella turcica) at the base of the brain.
The pituitary gland is physically attached to the brain by the pituitary, or hypophyseal stalk connected with the median eminence.
www.bookrags.com /Pituitary_gland   (1722 words)

  
 Posterior pituitary - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The posterior pituitary comprises the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland.
It is derived embryonically from downward-growth of the diencephalon.
intermediate/middle/tuberal/pituitary hypothalamus: infundibulum, median eminence, arcuate nucleus, ventromedial nucleus, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, tuber cinereum, pituitary gland (anterior pituitary,
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Posterior_pituitary_gland   (318 words)

  
 [No title]
The pituitary gland is sometimes called the "master" gland of the endocrine system, because it controls the functions of the other endocrine glands.
The pituitary gland is no larger than a pea, and is located at the base of the brain.
The gland is attached to the hypothalumus (a part of the brain that affects the pituitary gland) by nerve fibers.
www.umm.edu /endocrin/pitgland.htm   (207 words)

  
 Pituitary Tumor Treatment Center - UCSF Department of Neurosurgery   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The pituitary gland is often considered the "master gland" because it regulates most of the body's hormonal balance.
The gland itself is regulated by the brain through stimulatory and inhibitory hormones that travel through the infundibulum and the pituitary stalk.
The neurohypophysis is derived from the downward outgrowth of the neuroectoderm.
neurosurgery.medschool.ucsf.edu /patient_care/pituitary_info.html   (387 words)

  
 NeurosurgeryToday.org | What is Neurosurgery | Patient Education Materials | pituitary tumors
The pituitary is a small gland attached to the base of the brain (behind the nose) in an area called the pituitary fossa or sella turcica.
The pituitary gland has two distinct parts: the anterior pituitary is closest to the front of the head, while the posterior pituitary is closest to the back of the head.
The anterior pituitary accounts for about 80 percent of the pituitary gland, and is composed of the anterior lobe and the intermediate zone.
www.neurosurgerytoday.org /what/patient_e/pituitary.asp   (1615 words)

  
 Cancer Information, Research, and Treatment for all Types of Cancer | OncoLink
It is often referred to as the “master” gland of the body, because it produces hormones (proteins that are released into the body that influence the function of other organs) that control several other glands throughout the body, including the thyroid gland, the adrenal glands, and the sex organs (ovaries and testicles).
Pituitary adenomas are benign growths of glandular tissue that almost always grow from the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland.
Pituitary adenomas can be either non-secreting adenomas, meaning that they do not produce excess levels of hormones, or they can be secreting adenomas, meaning that they produce an excessive level of one or more of the hormones normally produced by the pituitary gland.
www.oncolink.upenn.edu /types/article.cfm?c=4&s=9&ss=819&id=9538   (3712 words)

  
 Pituitary Network Association - FAQ
The pituitary is a small, pea-sized gland located at the base of the brain that functions as "The Master Gland." From its lofty position above the rest of the body it sends signals to the thyroid gland, adrenal glands, ovaries and testes, directing them to produce thyroid hormone, cortisol, estrogen, testosterone, and many more.
Pituitary disorders can cause a wide spectrum of symptoms, both hormonal and neurological, due to its location near the brain, the intracranial nerves and blood vessels and because of the vital hormonal control that the gland provides.
Pituitary tumors can either be nonfunctional (that is they do not secrete hormones) or produce specific hormones, such as prolactin (causing infertility, decreased libido, and osteoporosis), growth hormone (causing acromegaly), ACTH (causing Cushing's), TSH (causing hypothyroidism), or be nonfunctional (that is they do not produce hormones).
www.pituitary.org /faq   (2482 words)

  
 UCLA NEUROSURGERY | Pituitary Disorders & Diseases
Structurally, the pituitary gland is divided into a larger anterior region (adenohypophysis) and a smaller posterior region (neurohypophysis).
The gland is connected to a region of the brain called the hypothalamus by the pituitary stalk.
Directly above the pituitary gland and in front of the pituitary stalk are the crossing fibers of the optic nerves called the optic chiasm.
www.pituitary.ucla.edu /Pituitary/PituitaryDis_1.html   (388 words)

  
 Pituitary Network Association - Disorders - Disorders
The gland is regulated by a region of the brain called the hypothalamus and they are connected by a thin delicate vascular connection called the pituitary stalk or infundibulum.
The pituitary gland is thus at the anatomical and functional crossroads of the brain, mind and body.
On each side of the pituitary gland is the cavernous sinus which is a venous channel through which runs the large carotid arteries that carry blood to the brain, and important nerves that control eye movements and facial sensation.
www.pituitary.org /disorders   (1233 words)

  
 Structure and Function of the Pituitary Gland in Dogs
The pituitary gland, also referred to as the hypophysis, is a small, oval gland that is attached to the underside or base of the brain.
The pituitary is attached to the hypothalamus (an important part of the underside of the brain) via a stalk-like structure.
The pituitary gland is no larger than the size of a pea, though its size varies among different dog breeds and individuals.
www.petplace.com /dogs/structure-and-function-of-the-pituitary-gland-in-dogs/page1.aspx   (1043 words)

  
 OHSU Pituitary Unit - Hormone Replacement Therapy and Pituitary Hormone Deficiency
The pituitary gland is a small organ (about the size of a pea) which is attached to the underside of the brain.
Pituitary hormone deficiency can have many causes including prior pituitary surgery, head irradiation, infiltrative disease, trauma, infection, and genetic abnormalities, but the vast majority of cases are caused by benign pituitary tumors (macroadenomas) pressing on and destroying the cells of the pituitary gland.
TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) is made in the anterior pituitary gland and is responsible for stimulating the release of thyroid hormone from the thyroid gland (a small butterfly shaped gland in the neck).
www.ohsupituitary.com /patients/hormone.asp   (1678 words)

  
 Pituitary Tumors
Pituitary tumors are abnormal growths on the pituitary gland.
The pituitary gland is a small oval shaped gland situated in a bony hollow at the base of the brain.
Pituitary tumors that grow from gland tissue (adenomas) and tumors that occur in children and adolescents (craniopharyngiomas) are the most common types.
www.hmc.psu.edu /healthinfo/pq/pituitarytumor.htm   (590 words)

  
 ACS :: What Are Pituitary Tumors?
The pituitary gland is found inside the skull just above the nasal passages, which are above the fleshy back part of the roof of the mouth.
There is no reliable way to distinguish pituitary carcinomas from large pituitary adenomas, except when a pituitary tumor spreads to another part of the body -- usually to the brain, spinal cord, meninges (covering layer of the brain and spinal cord), or bone and less often, to the liver, ovaries, heart or lungs.
In the past, pituitary tumors were classified by their appearance under the microscope after they were removed by surgery.
www.cancer.org /docroot/CRI/content/CRI_2_4_1x_What_Are_Pituitary_Tumors_61.asp?rnav=cri   (1397 words)

  
 Pituitary Foundation - The Pituitary Gland and its Hormones
Your pituitary is an important gland and is often referred to as the 'master gland', because it controls several other hormone glands including the thyroid and adrenals (which produce hormones essential for life) and the ovaries and testicles (for sex and reproduction).
The pituitary gland is about the size of a pea and is situated in a bony hollow beneath the base of your brain and just behind the bridge of your nose.
Craniopharyngioma is a rare and congenital (from birth) tumour that exerts pressure on the hypothalamus and often on the pituitary gland.
www.pituitary.org.uk /content/view/74/85   (3378 words)

  
 Pituitary Gland Information on Healthline
Neurohormones are synthesized by the hypothalamus and transported to the posterior pituitary.
Antidiuretic hormone (ADH)—A hormone released by the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland that increases the absorption of water by the kidneys.
Oxytocin—A hormone produced by the posterior pituitary that stimulates the movement of breast milk from the sacs in which the milk is produced to the larger ducts from which the milk is ejected.
www.healthline.com /galecontent/pituitary-gland   (807 words)

  
 Pituitary Disorders Education & Support
Pituitary adenoma is the medical term for a tumor of the pituitary gland.
A common example is inflammation of the pituitary gland characterized by infiltration of the gland with lymphocytes (called lymphocytic hypophysitis).
Abbreviated MEN-1, a condition involving tumors of the pituitary gland, parathyroid gland, and the pancreas, is a familial syndrome.
www.pituitarydisorder.net /pituitary_information.html   (1401 words)

  
 [No title]   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The pituitary gland, which is located in the center of the skull, just behind the bridge of the nose, is about the size of a pea.
The pituitary gland has two distinct parts, the anterior and the posterior lobes, each of which releases different hormones which affect bone growth and regulate activity in other glands.
This gland was once believed to be the main controlling gland of the body, but we now know that, important as it is, it is subservient to a master gland called the hypothalamus, which is the needed link between the pituitary gland and the brain.
www.innerbody.com /text/endo03.html   (394 words)

  
 The Pituitary Gland
The pituitary gland is sometimes called the "master" gland of the endocrine system, because it controls the functions of the other endocrine glands.
The pituitary gland is no larger than a pea, located at the base of the brain.
The gland is attached to the hypothalamus (a part of the brain that affects the pituitary gland) by nerve fibers.
www.healthsystem.virginia.edu /uvahealth/adult_endocrin/pitgland.cfm   (159 words)

  
 Pituitary Disorders
Anterior pituitary hormones are regulated by hypothalamic releasing and inhibitory hormones and the negative feedback action of the target glandular hormones at both pituitary and hypothalamic levels (Table 1).
Pituitary adenomas are rarely associated with parathyroid and pancreatic hyperplasia or neoplasia as part of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type I syndrome.
Pituitary MRI is the preferred diagnostic imaging technique in patients with visual loss or hypopituitarism suggestive of a pituitary tumor (Figure 2).
www.clevelandclinicmeded.com /diseasemanagement/endocrinology/pituitary/pituitary.htm   (4701 words)

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