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Topic: Plantations of Ireland


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In the News (Fri 24 May 19)

  
  Plantations of Ireland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The early Plantations of Ireland occurred in the context of the Tudor re-conquest of Ireland.
The Irish Catholic upper classes were unable to stop the continued plantations in Ireland because they had been barred from public office because of their religion and had become a minority in the Irish Parliament by 1615, as a result of the creation of "pocket boroughs" in planted areas.
Plantations stayed off the political agenda until the accession of Thomas Wentworth, a close advisor of Charles I, to the position of Lord Deputy of Ireland in 1632.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Plantations_of_Ireland   (4335 words)

  
 Ireland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
It is composed of the Republic of Ireland (officially named Ireland), a state which covers five-sixths of the island (south, east, west and north-west), and Northern Ireland; part of the United Kingdom, which covers the northeastern sixth of the island.
The GAA is organised on an all-Ireland basis with all 32 counties competing; traditionally, counties first compete within their province, in the provincial championships, and the winners then compete in the All-Ireland senior hurling or football championships.
Ireland's largest religious denomination is Roman Catholicism (about 70% for the entire island, and over 90% for the Republic), and most of the rest of the population adhere to one of the various Protestant denominations.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Ireland   (5436 words)

  
 CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Ireland
Ireland lies in the Atlantic Ocean, west of Great Britain, from which it is separated in the north-east by the North Channel, in the east by the Irish Sea, and in the south-east by St. George's Channel.
In Ireland as elsewhere they attacked the monasteries and churches, desecrated the altars, carried away the gold and silver vessels, and smoking ruins and murdered monks attested the fury of their assaults.
Michael Davitt, the son of a Mayo peasant, and favoured by the prevailing distress and by the heartlessness of the landlords, it rapidly spread.
www.newadvent.org /cathen/08098b.htm   (18270 words)

  
 Plantations of Ireland: Encyclopedia topic   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
The plantations substantially altered the demography of Ireland, creating large communities of people who had a British and Protestant (Protestant: An adherent of Protestantism) identity, in contrast to the earlier Irish and Roman Catholic (Roman Catholic: The Christian Church based in the Vatican and presided over by a pope and an episcopal hierarchy) inhabitants.
The early Plantations of Ireland occurred in the context of the Tudor re-conquest of Ireland (Tudor re-conquest of Ireland: the tudor re-conquest of ireland took place under the english tudor monarchs during the...
The Irish Catholic upper classes were unable to stop the continued plantations in Ireland because they had been barred from public office because of their religion and had become a minority in the Irish Parliament (Irish Parliament: the parliament of ireland was a legislature that existed from mediƦval times until 1800]...
www.absoluteastronomy.com /reference/plantations_of_ireland   (5092 words)

  
 Desmond's Concise History of Ireland
In Ireland, by early in the 14th Century, the Norman-Irish lords -- descendants of the original Normans who installed feudalism -- were actively resisting two of feudalism's principal tenets, the strong monarchy and the system of land ownership that fostered such power in the Crown.
The Plantations are the root cause of the class warfare (rich landlord versus poor tenant) and religious/cultural clashes that have plagued Ireland since 1610.
Plantations were the medieval equivalent of "ethnic cleansing" in that -- in theory at least -- all occupants of confiscated land were to be evicted and resettled in Connacht where they would be less of a military threat.
members.tripod.com /~JerryDesmond/index-2.html   (19254 words)

  
 Ireland -   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
It lies in the Atlantic Ocean and it is composed of the Republic of Ireland (officially named Ireland), a state which covers five sixths of the island (south, east, west and north-west), and Northern Ireland; part of the United Kingdom, which covers the northeastern sixth of the island.
The population of the island is approximately 5.8 million people (2001); 4.1 million in the Republic of Ireland (1.6 million in Greater Dublin) and 1.7 million, in Northern Ireland (0.8 million in Greater Belfast).
St Patrick's Saltire was formerly used to represent the island of Ireland by the all-island Irish Rugby Football Union (IRFU), before adoption of the four-provinces flag.
psychcentral.com /psypsych/Ireland   (4892 words)

  
 History of Ireland
Ireland received most of its early settlers and much of its early culture from the mainland of Europe.
Irish history is characterized by devastating wars that impoverished the country, by plantations that placed nine-tenths of the land in the hands of English and Scottish landlords, by political and religious persecution, and by economic problems that forced many Irish people to emigrate to other countries.
Finally, the area under the effective control of the English in Ireland was confined to a narrow stretch of territory on the east coast called the Pale or the English Pale.
www.jimkelley.com /irishhistory.htm   (7671 words)

  
 Limerick Woulfes
Early records in both England and Ireland indicate that there were at least two distinct origins for the surname***, from the personal name Ulf and from the nickname or cognomen, expressed in the various languages then spoken.
With the plantation the family would have found it much more difficult to re-establish the claim if they recognised the settlement and continued to live on land that was formerly theirs.
By 1560 he was back in Ireland, where he played the important role of papal superintendent of ecclesiastical affairs, essentially the leader of the church, always just one step ahead of the Protestant English, eager for his head.
ourworld.compuserve.com /homepages/mwoulfe/woulfefa.htm   (6601 words)

  
 A Brief History of Orangeism in Ireland
In 1583 a second plantation was attempted in Munster, and hundreds of thousands of acres were forcibly confiscated for use by men such as Sir Walter Raleigh.
This particular plantation differed from the previous ones in that the majority of the colonists were not Anglican but Presbyterian, the 'Dissenters' who refused to join the Church of England.
To the Protestants in Ireland at the time, and their descendants, the most significant event was the siege of Derry, also in 1690.
larkspirit.com /general/orangehist.html   (7130 words)

  
 Ireland History   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
James I, King of England, settled large numbers of Scottish and British Protestants on "plantations" in Ireland in the early 1600's, especially in Ulster.
In 1654 he gave all the fertile lands east of the Shannon to his soldiers and drove the Catholic Irish westward to the bogs.
The Parsons came into Ireland as Protestants and for the most part belonged to the Established Church of Ireland (Protestant).
members.aol.com /irep/history.htm   (279 words)

  
 Wolfe Tone, Chapter 3 - England Takes Over - LawBuzz, Trials Without Justice   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Young Wolfe's Ireland had long been dominated by England, but things did not start out that way.
Declaring that all newly established plantations belonged to England, Elizabeth forced the Irish people to rent the very land they had once owned.
This effort to "colonize" Ireland was very successful, especially in the areas around Dublin and in the province of
www.lawbuzz.com /justice/wolfe/england.htm   (220 words)

  
 John Locke -- Overview [Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy]
He was made commissioner of appeals in May 1689, and, from 1696 to 1700, he was a commissioner of trade and plantations at a salary of L1000 a year.
The direction of industry and commerce was held to be part of the statesman's duty; but, in the seventeenth century, it began to be carried out with less thoroughness than before; and at the same time new problems were opened up by the growth of the national life.
The American colonies, the enterprise of the East India Company, the planting of Ireland, the commercial rivalry with Holland and withy France, as well as questions regarding the rate of interest and the currency, occupied the attention of a crowd of writers in the second half of the century.
www.iep.utm.edu /l/locke.htm   (7767 words)

  
 Find in a Library: Windthrow and windsnap in forest plantations, Northern Ireland   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-11)
Windthrow and windsnap in forest plantations, Northern Ireland
To find this item in a library, enter a postal code, state, province, or country in the field above.
WorldCat is provided by OCLC Online Computer Library Center, Inc. on behalf of its member libraries.
www.worldcatlibraries.org /wcpa/ow/2141bd72b1dffe95.html   (74 words)

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