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Topic: Pluto


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  Pluto - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Pluto and its largest satellite Charon have often been considered a binary system because they are more nearly equal in size than any of the planet/moon combinations in the solar system, and because the barycentre of their orbits does not lie within either body.
Pluto's official status as a planet has been a constant subject of controversy, fueled by the past lack of a clear definition of planet, since at least as early as 1992, when the first Kuiper Belt Object, 1992 QB1, was discovered.
Pluto is shown as a planet on the Pioneer plaque, an inscription on the space probes Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11, launched in the early 1970s.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Pluto   (4782 words)

  
 Pluto Encyclopedia Article @ LaunchBase.net (Launch Base)   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Pluto is a celestial body in the solar system, classified both as a dwarf planet and as the prototype of a yet-to-be-named family of trans-Neptunian objects.
Pluto has an eccentric orbit that is highly inclined with respect to the planets and takes it closer to the Sun than Neptune during a portion of its orbit.
Pluto and its largest satellite Charon have often been considered a binary system because they are more nearly equal in size than any other planet/moon combination in the Solar System, and because the two bodies orbit a point not within the surface of either.
www.launchbase.net /encyclopedia/Pluto   (4618 words)

  
 Pluto- British Encyclopedia Online
Pluto is usually farther from the Sun than any of the nine planets; however, due to the eccentricity of its orbit, it is closer than Neptune for 20 years out of its 249 year orbit.
Pluto's temperature varies widely during the course of its orbit since Pluto can be as close to the sun as 30 AU and as far away as 50 AU.
Pluto was officially labeled the ninth planet by the International Astronomical Union in 1930 and named for the Roman god of the underworld.
www.british-encyclopedia.com /astronomy-pluto.html   (953 words)

  
 Encyclopedia :: encyclopedia : Project Pluto   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Unlike commercial reactors, which are surrounded by concrete, the Pluto reactor had to be small and compact enough to fly, but durable enough to survive a 7,000 mile (11,000 km) trip to a potential target.
Indeed, some questioned whether a cruise missile derived from Project Pluto would need a warhead at all; the radiation from its engine, coupled with the shock wave that would be produced by flying at Mach 3 at treetop level, would have left a wide path of destruction wherever it went.
But despite these and other successful tests the Pentagon, sponsor of the "Pluto project," had second thoughts; Intercontinental ballistic missile technology had proved to be more easily developed than previously thought, reducing the need for such highly capable cruise missiles.
www.hallencyclopedia.com /Project_Pluto   (770 words)

  
 Pluto - Crystalinks
Pluto was determined to have an atmosphere from an occultation observation in 1988.
While Pluto's identification as Planet X began to be doubted soon after its discovery, and for some decades afterwards some considered that a hypothetical tenth planet might be the true Planet X which supposedly caused anomalies in Uranus and Neptune's position, Pluto's identity as the solar system's ninth planet was unquestioned until the 1990s.
Pluto, the lord of the underworld, represents the body intelligence of man; and the rape of Persephone is symbolic of the divine nature assaulted and defiled by the animal soul and dragged downward into the somber darkness of Hades, which is here used as a synonym for the material, or objective, sphere of consciousness.
www.crystalinks.com /pluto.html   (3405 words)

  
 Meet the Neighbours - Pluto
Pluto was much too small and light to have caused the bumps in the orbits of those giant planets Uranus and Neptune - but by an amazing coincidence, Clyde found it in the predicted place.
Pluto is about 2,300 km across, and it's nearly twice as dense as water.
Pluto has a rocky core, with a layer of water-ice and with methane on the top.
www.abc.net.au /science/space/planets/pluto.htm   (1117 words)

  
 The Seattle Times: Nation & World: New definition boots Pluto from exclusive planet club
Pluto, which was discovered in 1930 and survived several swipes at its stature over the years, has been given a new label: "dwarf planet," a separate and lesser category of solar-system resident.
Pluto, he notes, swings inside the path of Neptune for 20 of the 248 years it takes for the puny former planet to circle the sun.
In addition to Pluto, the members of the new "dwarf" group are Ceres, the largest asteroid in the solar system, and 2003 UB313, a recently discovered Pluto-size orb that holds the record as the most distant object orbiting the sun.
seattletimes.nwsource.com /html/nationworld/2003224343_pluto25.html   (774 words)

  
 Pluto
Pluto is smaller than seven of the solar system's moons (the Moon, Io, Europa, Ganymede, Callisto, Titan and Triton).
Pluto's atmosphere may exist as a gas only when Pluto is near its perihelion; for the majority of Pluto's long year, the atmospheric gases are frozen into ice.
Perhaps Triton, Pluto and Charon are the only remaining members of a large class of similar objects the rest of which were ejected into the Oort cloud.
www.seds.org /nineplanets/nineplanets/pluto.html   (1515 words)

  
 Pluto
Pluto is the Roman god of the underworld and the judge of the dead.
Pluto's wife was Proserpina (Greek name, Persephone) whom he had kidnapped and dragged into the underworld.
Pluto was known as a pitiless god because if a mortal entered his Underworld they could never hope to return.
www.pantheon.org /articles/p/pluto.html   (107 words)

  
 SPACE.com -- Pluto Data Sheet
Pluto, which is only about two-thirds the size of our moon, is a cold, dark and frozen place.
Pluto's 248-year orbit is off-center in relation to the sun, which causes the planet to cross the orbital path of Neptune.
Pluto's orbit is inclined, or tilted, 17.1 degrees from the ecliptic -- the plane that Earth orbits in.
www.space.com /scienceastronomy/solarsystem/pluto-ez.html   (678 words)

  
 NASA - Pluto
Pluto and Neptune are the only planets that cannot be seen without a telescope.
Pluto is about 39 times as far from the sun as Earth is. Its average distance from the sun is about 3,647,240,000 miles (5,869,660,000 kilometers).
Pluto is small and icy, and the other four are huge and gaseous.
www.nasa.gov /worldbook/pluto_worldbook.html   (688 words)

  
 SPACE.com -- Pluto at 75: Still Crazy After All These Years
Pluto was discovered 75 years ago this week, and astronomers still don't know what to make of the small, frigid world.
Pluto's path is also extremely inclined, by 17.1 degrees, to the main plane of the solar system where the other planets travel.
Pluto, the Disney character, was named the following year, which leads Disney archivists to assume the dog took the name of the planet dominating the news at the time, said Disney archives director Dave Smith.
www.space.com /scienceastronomy/050215_pluto_anniv.html   (1218 words)

  
 BBC - Science & Nature - Space - Pluto
Pluto is the furthest planet from the Sun - except for 20 years during its 248 year orbit, when it comes closer to the Sun than Neptune.
Pluto was named after the Greek god of the underworld, possibly because it is so far from the Sun.
Pluto is the only planet that spins at the same rate as its moon orbits.
www.bbc.co.uk /science/space/solarsystem/pluto/index.shtml   (617 words)

  
 Tour the Solar System and Beyond - Pluto and Charon
Pluto surface, which is slightly reddish, is made up of exotic snows, including methane, nitrogen, and carbon monoxide.
Because Pluto's orbit is so elliptical, Pluto grows much colder during the part of each orbit when it is traveling away from the Sun.
One leading theory suggests that Pluto and Charon are relics of a population of hundreds or thousands of similar bodies that were formed early in solar system history.
spacekids.hq.nasa.gov /osskids/animate/pluto.html   (825 words)

  
 Dave Jewitt: Kuiper Belt: PLUTO   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Pluto's size conveys several secondary benefits, notably the ability to retain a thin atmosphere from which surface frosts are deposited.
Pluto's eccentricity and inclination were pumped up along with the eccentricities and inclinations of the ~few x 1000 other Plutinos (diameters > 100 km), probably driven by the radial migration of Neptune.
Pluto is not a real planet, they said, it's a dwarf planet.
www.ifa.hawaii.edu /~jewitt/kb/pluto.html   (523 words)

  
 Search The Llewellyn Encyclopedia: Pluto
Pluto: Pluto is the god of the Underworld.
The house position and aspects of Pluto show where you can get caught up in destructive thought patterns and activities that are not in your best interest or do not serve the general welfare of people.
The god of the Underworld rules over death; Pluto in your chart can indicate how you face and accept major changes in your life and in the lives of family and friends.
www.llewellynencyclopedia.com /term/Pluto   (381 words)

  
 Pluto - Astronomy for Kids
Pluto is so small that six moons of the solar system are larger than this small planet.
Pluto was discovered in 1938 by Clyde Tombaugh, who was working at the Percival Lowell observatory in Arizona at the time.
Pluto is so far away that the spacecraft won't arrive at the tiny planet until the year 2015.
www.dustbunny.com /afk/planets/pluto   (467 words)

  
 StarDate Online | Solar System Guide | Pluto
After 76 years of glory, the small ball of rock and ice known as Pluto was relegated to the solar system backwaters in 2006 when astronomers dropped it from the list of planets.
Pluto is basically a ball of frozen nitrogen, methane, and carbon dioxide wrapped around a small core of rock.
That suggests that Charon formed from the debris from a collision between Pluto and another large body, which may be the same process that gave birth to Earth's moon.
stardate.org /resources/ssguide/pluto.html   (464 words)

  
 Pluto Express   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Its major science objectives are to: (1) characterize the global geology and geomorphology of Pluto and Charon; (2) map the composition of Pluto's surface; and, (3) determine the composition and structure of Pluto's atmosphere.
Pluto has a tenuous atmosphere that only exists when the planet is closest to the Sun.
Pluto Express is designed to reach the planet as quickly as possible, before the tenuous can refreeze onto the surface as the planet recedes from the Sun.
www.solarviews.com /eng/pexpress.htm   (358 words)

  
 The Pluto Portal
Pluto and Charon orbit the Sun in a region where there may be a population of hundreds or thousands of similar bodies that were formed early in solar system history.
Pluto is about two-thirds the diameter of Earth’s Moon and may have a rocky core surrounded by a mantle of water ice.
Pluto appears to have a bright layer of frozen methane, nitrogen, and carbon monoxide on its surface.
www.plutoportal.net   (722 words)

  
 Pluto   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Pluto is the farthest planet from the Sun (usually) and by far the smallest.
Pluto is the only planet that has not been visited by a spacecraft.
There are some who think Pluto would be better classified as a large asteroid or comet rather than as a planet.
nineplanets.quay.net /nineplanets/pluto.html   (1347 words)

  
 Much ado about Pluto   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-10-21)
Astronomers once thought that Pluto may have been a satellite of Neptune's that was ejected to follow a tilted elliptical path around the sun.
Pluto's composition is unknown, but its density (about 2 gm/cm3) indicates that it is probably a mixture of rock and ice.
It seems that Pluto is a sentimental favorite to remain a planet among both scientists and the public.
science.nasa.gov /newhome/headlines/ast17feb99_1.htm   (1376 words)

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