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Topic: Pole star


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  North Star Volunteer Fire Department - Rescue Squad  /  Engine   /  HazMat / Alaska
The North Star Volunteer Fire Department was called to the residence shortly before 5 p.m., when the property owner smelled smoke in the home and found flames coming from the dryer vent tube in the laundry room.
Firefighters from the North Star Volunteer Fire Department and the Fairbanks, North Pole, Steese and Fort Wainwright departments battled the blaze until nearly 5:30 a.m.
On Sunday, 10/21/07, at 1:38 pm, the North Star Volunteer Fire Department was dispatched to the intersection of Badger Road and Nordale Road for a motor vehicle accident with injuries, with 2 vehicles involved.
www.northstarfire.org   (759 words)

  
  Finding the Pole Star
Imagine a line connecting the two stars at the front of the "dipper", continue it on the side where the dipper is "open" to a distance 5 times that between the two stars (the flag shortens this a bit!), and you will arrive at (or very close to) the pole star.
Because of their role in locating Polaris, these two stars are often called "the guides." And by the way--the last-but-one star in the handle of the "dipper", named Mizar by Arab astronomers, is a double star, whose components are readily separated by binoculars--or, some say, by very sharp eyes during good viewing conditions.
The two front stars of the "little dipper" (quite smaller and more square than the big one) are fairly bright, but other stars are rather dim and require good eyes and a dark sky.
www-spof.gsfc.nasa.gov /stargaze/Spolaris.htm   (707 words)

  
  The Sky Above Us
Stars near those poles march in daily circles around them, and the closer they are, the smaller the circles (they do not rise and set).
By pure chance, a moderately bright star is seen near the northern celestial pole--Polaris, the pole star (or north star).
Hence the pole star is always in the same spot--north of the observer, and the same height above the horizon.
www-istp.gsfc.nasa.gov /stargaze/Scelsph.htm   (1850 words)

  
  Pole star at AllExperts
A pole star is a visible star that is approximately aligned with the Earth's axis of rotation; that is, a star that lies in the direction pointed to by one of Earth's poles.
The term the pole star usually refers to the star Polaris (colloquially referred-to as the "north star") which is the current northern pole star.
However, the stars themselves exhibit motion relative to each other (including the sun), and this so-called proper motion is another cause of the apparent drift of a pole star.
en.allexperts.com /e/p/po/pole_star.htm   (463 words)

  
  Pole star
A pole star is a visible star that is approximately aligned with the Earth's axis of rotation; that is, a star that lies in the direction pointed to by one of Earth's poles.
The term the pole star usually refers to the star Polaris (colloquially referred-to as the "north star") which is the current northern pole star.
However, the stars themselves exhibit motion relative to each other (including the sun), and this so-called proper motion is another cause of the apparent drift of a pole star.
www.xasa.com /wiki/en/wikipedia/p/po/pole_star_1.html   (301 words)

  
 Stars as a Compass kits - Preview - Astronomy In Your Hands
Unfortunately the second star of the double will not always be visible from a city because of the amount of light coming from streetlights.
The Pole Star may (in some locations) be below the horizon, but if you follow the line for three hands-widths you will find its location even though you cannot see it.
The sixth star can be seen on one of the middle arms of the W. If you are looking from a city this star might be very faint, or even impossible to see, due to the amount of light coming from streetlights.
www.astronomyinyourhands.com /activities/starcompass.preview.html   (1146 words)

  
 Star Tales – Ursa Minor   (Site not responding. Last check: )
At the end of the Little Bear’s tail (or the dipper’s handle) is the star Alpha Ursae Minoris, commonly known by the Latin name Polaris because it is the nearest bright star to the north celestial pole.
Contrary to common belief, the north pole star is not particularly bright.
Two stars in the bowl of the Little Dipper, Beta and Gamma Ursae Minoris, are sometimes referred to as the Guardians of the Pole.
www.ianridpath.com /startales/ursaminor.htm   (535 words)

  
 pole star
Although Polaris, the north star, sits within half a degree of the north celestial pole, this was not always so.
Earth’s rotational axis undergoes a slow, 26,000-year wobble, known as precession, around the perpendicular to its orbit around the Sun, as a result of which the position of the sky's rotational pole, around which all the stars seem to go, constantly changes.
The star currently closest to the south celestial pole is Sigma Octantis, which is barely visible to the naked eye and lies 1º 3' from the pole (though it was as close as 45' just a century ago).
www.daviddarling.info /encyclopedia/P/pole_stars.html   (240 words)

  
 POLARIS OR NORTH STAR OR POLE STAR   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The famous Pole Star (also called Polaris or North Star) lies less than one degree from the Northern Celestial Pole, and so always lies north from an Earth-bound observer's point of view.
The Big Dipper is a cluster of stars consisting of 7 bright stars, forming a dipper, a small pot with a long handle.
Since the altitude of the Pole star is always equal to the observer's latitude, if you know your latitude, that's how high from the horizon the pole star will be.
moonsighting.com /polaris.html   (177 words)

  
 Polaris - The Pole Star
The Pole Star once was Thuban (3000 B.C.), the third star from the end of the tail in Draco.
In China it was known as Tou Mu, Chinese goddess of the North Star.
They looked on the star as an evil star, calling it Al Kiblah, because it was the star "least distant from the pole." It was Polaris, they said, who had slain the great warrior of the sky who forever lies in the huge coffin outlined by the stars marking the Big Dipper.
www.coldwater.k12.mi.us /lms/planetarium/myth/polaris.html   (1173 words)

  
 POLARIS OR NORTH STAR OR POLE STAR   (Site not responding. Last check: )
The famous Pole Star (also called Polaris or North Star) lies less than one degree from the Northern Celestial Pole, and so always lies north from an Earth-bound observer's point of view.
The Big Dipper is a cluster of stars consisting of 7 bright stars, forming a dipper, a small pot with a long handle.
Since the altitude of the Pole star is always equal to the observer's latitude, if you know your latitude, that's how high from the horizon the pole star will be.
www.moonsighting.com /polaris.html   (177 words)

  
 eSky: Northern Celestial Pole
The declination of the Pole Star (its angular distance from the Celestial Equator) is fixed, by definition, at +90°.
This is very useful for navigation in the northern hemisphere, since the altitude of the Northern Celestial Pole is always equal to the observer's own latitude: by measuring the Pole's angle to the horizon, it's possible to exactly calculate your own distance from the Earth's equator.
This star is Polaris, the brightest of the stars in Ursa Minor, which is easily located by the two Pointer stars in Ursa Major.
www.glyphweb.com /esky/concepts/northerncelestialpole.html   (586 words)

  
 Polaris Information
The giant star of Polaris is a classical Population I Cepheid variable (although it was once thought to be Population II due to its high galactic latitude).
Other stars along this circle were the pole star in the past and will be again in the future, including Thuban and Vega.
Although Polaris is a relatively bright star and is conspicuous since no other stars of similar brightness are close to it, it is nowhere near the brightest; it is actually the 46th brightest star in the night sky.
www.bookrags.com /wiki/Polaris   (1120 words)

  
 Star Tales – Octans   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Beta Octantis was another star in the tail of Hydrus and was the most southerly star catalogued by de Houtman: he gave its declination as –83° 40’.
In later designs the arc was extended from one eighth of a circle to one-sixth and the instrument became the modern sextant.
The nearest naked-eye star to the south celestial pole is Sigma Octantis, a degree away from the pole, although at magnitude 5.4 it is far from prominent.
www.ianridpath.com /startales/octans.htm   (287 words)

  
 The Pole Star quiz -- free game
The brightest stars of this constellation are in the shape of what appears to be a sauce-pan or a ladle (the type you use for serving soup or juice at parties), and so they are collectively called the "Big Dipper".
If the line joining 2 of the stars of Ursa Major is extended, you invariably hit the Pole Star, thus these 2 are very aptly referred to as the 'Pointers'.
Like the Pole Star in the North, there is, as well, a Pole Star in the South, except...erm...it isn't nearly as visible.
www.funtrivia.com /playquiz.cfm?qid=181345   (722 words)

  
 Alice Bailey & Djwhal Khul - Esoteric Astrology - II - Scorpio, the Scorpion   (Site not responding. Last check: )
It is related to Polaris, the Pole Star (found in the Little Bear) and it is also peculiarly susceptible to the influence of that Pointer in the Great Bear which is the nearest to the Pole Star.
Esoterically speaking, the Pole Star is regarded as the "star of reorientation" whereby the art of "refacing and recovering that which is lost" is developed.
Then the energy of the Pointer furthest from the Pole Star begins to make its presence felt and a sense of right direction or guidance is registered by the disciple upon the Path, and such guidance (when followed) leads man nearer to the Hierarchy.
laluni.helloyou.ws /netnews/bk/astrology/astr1075.html   (752 words)

  
 Age of the Goddess
The pole of the ecliptic is the center point of the ecliptic as projected onto the celestial dome.
The vernal equinox marks a point on the ecliptic considered to be an indicator of a zodiacal age, while the North Celestial Pole points to the a star in the northern sky considered to be an indicator of the polar age.
These stars are soothing to the sailor's soul for the polar stars are a guide back to the real world that the seaman abandoned when he threw his destiny into the sea.
www.aquarian-age.net /goddess_print.html   (3602 words)

  
 Pole star Information
Its mean position (taking account of precession and proper motion) will reach a maximum declination of +89°32'23", so 1657" or 0.4603° from the celestial north pole, in February 2102.
Its maximum apparent declination (taking account of nutation and aberration) will be +89°32'50.62", so 1629" or 0.4526° from the celestial north pole, on 24 March 2100.
The Southern Cross constellation functions as an approximate southern pole constellation, by pointing to where a southern pole star should be.
www.bookrags.com /wiki/Pole_star   (368 words)

  
 Ursa Minor
Or the bear is in pursuit of the Pole star, although that star is protected by the Guards of Ursa Minor.
The proximity of stars of the two bears (Ursa Major and Ursa Minor) to the North Celestial Pole gave the impression that they were wheeling around this point, pulling perhaps a plough behind them, tilling the heavenly fields and driven on by Bootes the Bear Driver who chases or herds the Bears around Polaris.
The Pole Star was Thuban, alpha Draco, in 2700 BCE, the third star from the end of the tail of Draco, and was then known as the "Judge of Heaven" during the time of the building of the pyramids.
users.winshop.com.au /annew/UrsaMinor.html   (3788 words)

  
 pole (1) definition - Dictionary - MSN Encarta
North or South Pole: either of the two points on the Earth, the North and South Poles, that are the endpoints of its axis of rotation, are farthest from the equator, and are surrounded by icecaps
They're at opposite poles as far as their taste in music is concerned.
A pole is a long straight piece of wood, metal, etc. (as in a ski pole, the pole vault) or either of two opposite regions of the Earth, a magnet, etc. (as in the South Pole, be poles apart).
encarta.msn.com /encnet/features/dictionary/DictionaryResults.aspx?refid=1861738252   (342 words)

  
 Ursa Minor   (Site not responding. Last check: )
However beta UMi (Kochab), the brightest star in the constellation, is sometimes closer to the pole than is alpha, as it was 3000 years ago.
Another star which periodically becomes the Pole Star is Thuban (alpha Draconis), as it was some 4600 years ago, at the time of the pyramid building in Egypt.
The stars range from second magnitude down to fifth (and even sixth); if these latter stars are clearly seen, it's a good night for viewing.
www.dibonsmith.com /umi_con.htm   (355 words)

  
 Science: The Pole Star stops pulsating - 05 May 1990 - New Scientist
THE POLE STAR is changing rapidly from a star that pulsates into one that is stable, according to astronomers in Canada.
They say we are very fortunate to catch the change, because the Pole Star has been pulsating for around 40,000 years and theory predicts that its pulsations should die away in a period of only 10 years.
The Pole Star, known officially as Polaris, has always been a favourite target of astronomers because it is immediately above the North Pole, and so its position remains fixed in the sky as the Earth turns.
www.newscientist.com /article/mg12617152.800-science-the-pole-star-stops-pulsating-.html   (278 words)

  
 Star Names
Star names are either of ancient origin, of more recent historical origin, or are assigned by astronomical organizations under the umbrella of the International Astronomical Union (the organization of professional research astronomers).
Though the number of names is increased by applying superscripts to stars that fall near one another (a string of stars in Orion became Pi-1, Pi-2, Pi- 3 Orionis, and so on), the system was still limited to the brighter stars, faint naked-eye stars never qualifying.
The HD catalogue, while a general tool for star names, is also a specialty catalogue, and was created to list the spectral classes of over 300,000 stars.
www.astro.uiuc.edu /~kaler/sow/starname.html   (1674 words)

  
 Pole Star Home Page   (Site not responding. Last check: )
Figure 1 is a photograph of the receiver `front-end' as it appears in the lab.
Pole STAR will increase the data throughput of AST/RO by at least a factor of 4 in this important wavelength regime.
Figure 2: The Pole Star footprint on the sky.
soral.as.arizona.edu /pole-star   (210 words)

  
 Navigation
Imagine yourself standing at night at point P on Earth and observing the pole star (or better, the position of the north celestial pole, near that star), at an elevation angle h above the horizon.
As with the pole star, rather than measuring the angle a from the zenith--which is not marked in the sky!--it is simpler to measure the angle (90°-a) from the horizon, which at sea is usually sharply defined.
In 1893 the Norwegian explorer Fridtjof Nansen set out towards the north pole (located in the ice-covered Arctic Ocean) in a specially strengthened ship, the "Fram." Having studied the currents of the Arctic Ocean, Nansen allowed "Fram" to be frozen into the polar ice, with which it slowly drifted across the water.
www-istp.gsfc.nasa.gov /stargaze/Snavigat.htm   (1792 words)

  
 Star trails around the south celestial pole
More information on relationship between the measurement of time and star trails is in the caption to a similar picture here.
During the long winter nights observers using AAT occasionally peer outside to inspect the weather and as they walk around the dome their lights produce the irregular lines at the catwalk level.
The upper part of the dome is however illuminated by the light of the natural night sky and stars alone.
www.aao.gov.au /images.html/captions/aat006.html   (274 words)

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