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Topic: Polish government in exile


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In the News (Thu 18 Apr 19)

  
  Polish government in exile - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Government of the Polish Republic in exile was the government of Poland after the German occupation of Poland in September 1939.
Many of the Polish exiles opposed this action, believing that this government was a façade for the establishment of Communist rule in Poland, a view that was later proved correct; after losing an election which was later shown to have been fraudulent, Mikolajczyk left Poland again in 1947.
The Polish armed forces in exile were disbanded in 1945 and most of their members, unable to return to Communist Poland, settled in other countries.
bonneylake.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/Polish_government_in_exile   (1401 words)

  
 Polish government in exile - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Government of the Polish Republic in Exile was the government of Poland after the country had been occupied by Germany and the Soviet Union during September-October 1939.
Many Polish exiles opposed this action, believing that this government was a façade for the establishment of Communist rule in Poland, a view that was later proven correct; after losing an election which was later shown to have been fraudulent, Mikołajczyk left Poland again in 1947.
The Polish Armed Forces in exile were disbanded in 1945, and most of their members, unable safely to return to Communist Poland, settled in other countries.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Polish_government_in_exile   (1457 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Polish Government in Exile   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Government of the Polish Republic in exile maintained a continuous existence in exile from the time of the German occupation of Poland in September 1939 until the end of the Communist rule in Poland in 1990.
Polish Secret State (also known as Polish Underground State; Polish Polskie Państwo Podziemne) is a term coined by Jan Karski in his book Story of a Secret State; it is used to refer to all underground resistance organizations in Poland during World War II, both military and civilian.
Many of the Polish exiles opposed this action, believing that this government was a façade for the establishment of Communist rule in Poland, a view that was later proved correct; after losing an election which was later shown to have been fraudulent, Mikołajczyk left Poland again in 1947.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Polish-Government-in-Exile   (5393 words)

  
 Encyclopedia: Polish government-in-exile   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The government in exile, based first in Paris and then in London —; containing the City of London —; is the capital of the United Kingdom and of England and a major world city.
Polish Socialist Party and the The National Democratic Party was a pre-WWII Polish right-wing political party co-founded by Roman Dmowski.
Polish II Corps (Polish Drugi Korpus Wojska Polskiego, 1943-1947), was a major tactical and operational unit of the Polish Armed Forces in the West during the World War II.
www.nationmaster.com /encyclopedia/Polish-government_in_exile   (8978 words)

  
 Polish contribution to World War II - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Polish Air Force in France comprised eighty-six aircraft in four squadrons, one and a half of the squadrons being fully operational while the rest were in various stages of training.
In 1941, pursuant to an agreement between the Polish government in exile and Joseph Stalin, the Soviets released many Polish citizens, from whom a 75,000-strong army was formed in the Middle East under General Władysław Anders ("Anders' Army").
Polish army units on the Eastern Front included the 1st Polish Army and the 2nd Polish Army, with 10 infantry divisions and 5 armored brigades.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Polish_contribution_to_World_War_II   (2346 words)

  
 The Avalon Project : The Atlantic Conference
The Polish Government, he said, had hailed the Roosevelt-Churchill Declaration in the same spirit of solidarity which ought to unite all nations struggling for the freedom of the world.
While his Government was deeply sensible of the great importance of the Declaration, his Government felt however, that the abstract character of the policy of justice, as set forth therein, would render its practice inadequate to meet actual conditions on the continent.
The Polish Government, and according to its reports from Poland, the Polish people, intend, in event of an Allied victory, to insist vigorously upon the re-establishment of Polish-Russian frontiers as defined by the Treaty of Riga.
www.yale.edu /lawweb/avalon/wwii/atlantic/at15.htm   (1578 words)

  
 Polish History - Part 12
In December 1940, the Government Delegation in the Homeland, led by the deputy prime minister of the government in exile, was set up to operate clandestinely.
As early as 1940 the government in exile established the Polish Armed Forces in the West.
The government in exile, led by Prime Minister Tomasz Arciszewski, opposed the dictate.
www.poloniatoday.com /history12.htm   (1239 words)

  
 Polish government in exile -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Most of the Polish Navy escaped to Britain, and thousands of other Poles escaped through (A Balkan republic in southeastern Europe) Romania or across the (A sea in northern Europe; stronghold of the Russian navy) Baltic Sea to continue the fight.
The government in exile, based first in Paris and then in (The capital and largest city of England; located on the Thames in southeastern England; financial and industrial and cultural center) London, was recognised by all the Allied governments.
Many of the Polish exiles opposed this action, believing that this government was a (The face or front of a building) façade for the establishment of Communist rule in Poland, a view that was later proved correct; after losing an election which was later shown to have been fraudulent, Mikolajczyk left Poland again in 1947.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/P/Po/Polish_Government_in_Exile.htm   (1194 words)

  
 SOVIET OCCUPATION AND THE POLISH ARMY IN THE SOVIET UNION
Also, in an effort to destroy Polish presence in eastern Poland, which was annexed by the Soviets on the strength of the Ribbentrop-Molotow pact of 1939, entire Polish families were expropriated and deported in 1940 and 1941 from these territories to Siberia and Kazachstan.
Polish General Władysław Anders, released from the NKVD (People's Commissariat of Internal Affairs) prison in Moscow, was nominated to that post.
The Polish Government in Exile in London arranged for an inspection of the graves by the Swiss Red Cross, an impartial international organization.
www.apacouncil.org /ww2/9so.html   (807 words)

  
 The Order of St. Stanislas -Formidable Force For Polish Culture
Separation from the late Polish Government (In Exile) was accomplished because all members of the Government (In Exile) recognised that there was no place for the re-constituted Order of Saint Stanislas in the Third Republic.
The merger of the Polish Government (In Exile) with the new Poland of Lech Walesa made specific reference to the fact that the modern Order of Saint Stanislas was not being folded back into modern Poland, but would have its separate existence.
Although fairly unknown outside of the Polish community, the Order of Saint Stanislas numbers thousands of Companions spread throughout the world, made up of honorable men and women of all races and creeds, a true brotherhood of man. It is recognised as a charitable Order concerned with raising the standard of living in East Europe.
www.angelfire.com /realm/StStanislas/Culture.html   (836 words)

  
 The Order of St. Stanislas -Publications on the Polish Government in Exile
A most important monograph on the history of the late Polish Government (In Exile) written by a well known New Zealand author who knew at first hand virtually all of the major players in the 'Exile' community.
General Hryniewicz-Bakierowski is a Polish national hero from World War II who was loyal to President Zaleski and remained loyal to President Sokolnicki after the death of President August Zaleski.
Another important work which covers the various political activities of the late Polish Government (In Exile), and as well the 'Central European Council' (with photographs) which was the all encompassing umbrella that the various 'Exile' groups were involved in.
www.angelfire.com /realm/StStanislas/Publications.html   (410 words)

  
 Count Edward Raczyñski, Poland (1891-1993) - Hall of Freedom - Politics - Liberal International
He was a central figure in the Polish government-in-exile based in London during and after World War II and served one term as President-in-exile (1979-86).
He joined the Polish foreign service in 1919 and was a delegate to the 1932-34 disarmament conference in Geneva.
Raczyñski served in the Polish government-in-exile as foreign minister (1941-43), but he refused to join the post-war communist government established in Warsaw as a consequence of the 1945 Yalta Conference.
www.liberal-international.org /editorial.asp?ia_id=1038   (172 words)

  
 The Polish Home Army Uprising, August 1, 1944 - January 1945
In addition to the Polish airborne and regular units serving with the Allied armies in the west, a sizable irregular force was organizing in Warsaw.
The London Polish Government-in-Exile sent orders to the Polish Home Army that they would liberate the Polish capital themselves, sending a message that Poland would not be indebted to or under the influence of the Soviet Union.
The Polish Home Army Uprising was the first of the cracks in the Soviet-Anglo-American alliance that would lead to the Cold War.
www.worldwar2database.com /html/warsaw.htm   (475 words)

  
 List of Presidents of Poland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Polish Government in Exile operated pursuant to the Constitution of Poland of April 1935, the legal basis for the government.
The Council of State was, theoretically, a collective head of state; de facto, however, the most important personage was the First Secretary of the Central Committee of the Polish United Workers' Party.
Polish presidential election in 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005
www.secaucus.us /project/wikipedia/index.php/President_of_Poland   (395 words)

  
 SSR 64-12   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
It was established that H had served in the army of the Polish Government-in-exile in London under British Command from September 23, 1941, until his honorable discharge on May 21, 1946.
On September 30, a Polish Government-in-exile was established provisionally in Paris, and on June 19, 1940, that Government transferred to London.
On the basis of the foregoing, it is found that Poland, represented by the Polish Government-in-exile in London, was at war with a World War II enemy of the United States (i.e., Germany) on September 16, 1940.
www.ssa.gov /OP_Home/rulings/oasi/55/SSR64-12-oasi-55.html   (559 words)

  
 The New York Review of Books: THE FATE OF POLAND
He thinks that the Polish government in exile was just a self-appointed body, a group of people who called themselves a government and that one may not speak of the breach in continuity of the Polish state in 1945, as this breach had occurred in 1939.
In reality the Polish government was a perfectly constitutional body; it was operating under the provisions of the 1935 constitution which assured special legal forms of continuity in the case of war (this constitution was criticized by many people for other reasons, which we do not need to dwell upon now).
If the Polish people had been able to decide their fate after the war, a new constitution would undoubtedly have been necessary; the post-1935 constitution, on which Kolakowski rests his case, was no longer a viable political instrument.
www.nybooks.com /articles/4958   (935 words)

  
 AllRefer.com - Stanislaus Mikolajczyk (Polish History, Biography) - Encyclopedia
He sought to reach agreement with the USSR concerning the Polish-Russian border and with the Polish Committee of National Liberation (see Lublin) concerning the future Polish government.
After the Yalta Conference he joined the new Polish government as vice premier and minister of agriculture.
He soon was the only center of opposition to the Communist and left-wing Socialist leaders of the state, and the procedure adopted in the elections of 1947 resulted in his defeat.
reference.allrefer.com /encyclopedia/M/Mikolajc.html   (241 words)

  
 Articles - Stanisław Mikołajczyk   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
In the 1920s Mikołajczyk became active in the Polish Peasant Party (PSL), and after holding a number of offices in the government of Poznań province, he was elected to the Sejm (the Polish Parliament) in 1929.
He was immediately asked to join the Polish government in exile as deputy Chairman of the Polish National Council.
Many of the Polish exiles opposed this action, believing that this government was a façade for the establishment of Communist rule in Poland.
www.gaple.com /articles/Stanislaw_Mikolajczyk   (1103 words)

  
 ENRIQUE AYNAT: Auschwitz and the Exile Government of Poland According to the 'Polish Fortnightly Review'
After the occupation of Poland by the Germans and Soviets in September of 1939, a Polish government was formed that was determined to continue the struggle for independence, sovereignty, liberty and the territorial integrity of the Polish Republic.
The PGE was recognized by all the Allied nations, including (from July of 1941 to April of 1943) the Soviet Union.
Nor is it true that the PGE considered Auschwitz a symbol of the suffering of the Poles that it must, in its propaganda, put before news of the extermination of the Jews.
www.vho.org /GB/Journals/JHR/11/3/Aynat282-319.html   (11259 words)

  
 Polish WW2 Exiled Government Awards
Created on 3 July 1945 for award to all members of the Polish Air Force with at least 6 months of meritorious service with a unit engaged in military operations against the enemy or with at least one year's service with another unit.
Created on 1 September 1984 by Decree of the President of the Polish Republic in Exile, this cross commemorates the September/October 1939 campaign against the German and Soviet invaders.
It was awarded to all that took part in the fighting or aided the Polish Armed Forces in the said period.
users.skynet.be /hendrik/eng/polishexile.html   (239 words)

  
 Lenni Brenner: Zionism in the Age of the Dictators (Chap. 22)
The Polish exile army was dominated by anti-Semites, who were concerned to keep Jews out of their army, and this proposal of Jewish self-segregation was attractive to them.
In 1942 Mme Zofia Zaleska, an Endek, had proposed to the exile Sejm that a Jewish homeland be established outside Poland and that the Jews be asked to emigrate.
The Polish exiles were dependent on Britain and, after the arrival of the Polish Army in Palestine, the Zionists could have put extra pressure on the British.
www.marxists.de /middleast/brenner/ch22.htm   (1821 words)

  
 The Self Styled Order of St. Stanislas of Mr. Juliusz Nowina-Sokolnicki
The details of Mr Sokolnicki's claim to the Presidency of Poland are too complex to be given here; suffice it to say that the present Polish government does not regard him as one of those in succession to the titular Presidency from 1939 onwards.
A statement from the Polish Government in Exile in 1987 stated that Mr.
Sokolnicki and his followers claim that their Order is the direct continuation not only of the Polish Order but also of the Russian Order, unaware perhaps of the claim laid to it by the current Head of the Imperial House of Romanov.
www.geocities.com /polishnobles/Sokolnicki.html   (1325 words)

  
 Warsaw Voice - Poland the Hawk
On July 5, 1945 the British ambassador to the Polish government-in-exile informed the Polish ambassador, Count Edward Raczyński-the same man with whom he had signed the alliance treaty in 1939-that the official recognition of the Polish government was being revoked, due to recognition being given to the Soviet-controlled government in Warsaw.
To Polish ears, when the politicians from the three countries contesting aid for Turkey quote the social mood, this can't help but sound like the words spoken 64 years ago in France, "We refuse to die for Gdańsk," which was France's excuse for doing nothing for Poland.
It's worth asking how the president and his colleagues from the government imagine this importance after they have found themselves on the other side of the chasm that is widening between America and its acolytes on one side and Germany and France on the other.
www.warsawvoice.pl /view/1333   (1571 words)

  
 SIKORSKI Family Book
It is derived from the Polish "sikora" - a titmouse or coal mouse.
She served as the Chief of the Polish Women's Auxiliary during that time and was killed along with her father in a plane crash at Gibraltar on 4 July 1943.
Jan 1942: The Polish Foreign Minister reminds the Soviets that Polish soldiers that should have been freed by the Polish- Russian Agreement are still unaccounted for.
www.geocities.com /Heartland/Hills/7640/sikobk.html   (1566 words)

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