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Topic: Polynesian languages


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  Austronesian languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Austronesian languages are a language family widely dispersed throughout the islands of Southeast Asia and the Pacific, with a few members spoken on continental Asia.
Austronesian is one of the largest language families in the world, both in terms of number of languages (1244 according to Ethnologue) and in terms of the geographical extent of the homelands of its languages (from Madagascar to Easter Island).
However, it is clear that the greatest genealogical diversity is found among the Formosan languages of Taiwan, and the least diversity among the islands of the Pacific, supporting a dispersal of the family from Taiwan or mainland China.
www.wikipedia.org /wiki/Austronesian_languages   (870 words)

  
 ninemsn Encarta - Austronesian Languages
The languages of Australia (Aboriginal languages) and most of New Guinea (Papuan languages), however, are not part of this family.
The 237 Western Oceanic languages are spoken in Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, and Indonesia.
In general, the Austronesian languages use affixes (suffixes, infixes, prefixes) attached to base words to modify the meaning or to indicate the function of the word in the sentence.
au.encarta.msn.com /encyclopedia_761553922/Austronesian_Languages.html   (645 words)

  
 Austronesian languages : Polynesian languages   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Austronesian languages is a family of languages widely dispersed throughout Southeast Asia and the Pacific islands, formerly referred to as Malayo-Polynesian languages.
All Austronesian languages have a low entropy; that is, the text is quite repetitive in terms of the frequency of sounds.
Comparative reconstruction, confirmed by archaeology, has shown that the original homeland of all these languages was the island of Taiwan, and that the deepest divisions in Austronesian are among families of native Taiwanese (Formosan) languages (unrelated to Chinese).
www.termsdefined.net /po/polynesian-languages.html   (414 words)

  
 Malayo-Polynesian languages - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Malagasy is a geographic outlier spoken on Madagascar.
The Malayo-Polynesian languages tend to use reduplication (repetition of all or part of a word) to express the plural, and like other Austronesian languages have a low entropy; that is, a text is quite repetitive in terms of the frequency of sounds.
All of the said languages have official status in the countries and territories of the Pacific Ocean.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Malayo-Polynesian   (257 words)

  
 Polynesian languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Polynesian languages are a group of related languages spoken in the region known as Polynesia.
They are considered to be a part of the Austronesian language group, belonging to the Eastern Malayo-Polynesian branch of that family.
Although none of the modern Polynesian languages allow consonant clusters, this tendency appears to be have developed well after the early settlement of the islands.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Polynesian_languages   (326 words)

  
 Austronesian languages   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Austronesian languages are a family of languages widely dispersed throughout the islands of Southeast Asia and the Pacific, with a few members spoken on continental Asia.
On this island the deepest divisions in Austronesian are among families of native Taiwanese (Formosan) languages (unrelated to Chinese).
The Malayo-Polynesian languages tend to use reduplication (repetition of all or part of a word) to express the plural, and all Austronesian languages have a low entropy; that is, the text is quite repetitive in terms of the frequency of sounds.
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/austronesian_languages   (393 words)

  
 Malayo-Polynesian languages - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Malayo-Polynesian languages are a subgroup of the Austronesian languages.
The Malayo-Polynesian (MP) languages are divided into two major subgroups, the Western MP and the Central-Eastern MP.
Micronesian includes the languages spoken by the native peoples of Micronesia such as Gilbertese or Nauruan.
en.wikipedia.org /wiki/Malayo-Polynesian_languages   (239 words)

  
 Malayo-Polynesian languages -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The (Click link for more info and facts about Malayo-Polynesian languages) Malayo-Polynesian languages are a subgroup of the (The family of languages spoken in Australia and Formosa and Malaysia and Polynesia) Austronesian languages.
The Malayo-Polynesian languages tend to use (The act of repeating over and again (or an instance thereof)) reduplication (repetition of all or part of a word) to express the plural, and like other Austronesian languages have a low entropy; that is, a text is quite repetitive in terms of the frequency of sounds.
Micronesian includes the languages spoken by the native peoples of Micronesia such as (A native or inhabitant of Nauru) Nauruan.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/M/Ma/Malayo-Polynesian_languages1.htm   (264 words)

  
 Oceanic subgroups   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
The Oceanic languages are members of the Austronesian language family, a language family which, until the advent of European exploration and settlement of the 'New World', had spread out across a considerably larger proportion of the earth than had any other language family.
Austronesian languages are spoken from Madagascar in the west to Easter Island in the east, and from Taiwan and Hawaii in the north to New Zealand in the south.
He maintains that speakers of languages outside the Western Oceanic group migrated from the area in which POC was spoken, and that the languages of the Western Oceanic group evolved by a process of dialect differentiation from that point on.
www.tlg.uci.edu /~opoudjis/Work/Oceanic_guide.html   (5840 words)

  
 Malayo-Polynesian languages. The Columbia Encyclopedia, Sixth Edition. 2001-05   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
These languages have come to be widely understood in their respective countries, although not always as a first language.
Melanesian languages are found on the islands of Fiji, the Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, New Caledonia, the Bismarck Archipelago, and New Guinea.
The Malayo-Polynesian languages exhibit an abundance of vowels and a comparative paucity of consonants.
www.bartleby.com /65/ma/MalayoPo.html   (417 words)

  
 Intro to Tagalog Language
One of the factors that complicate the language situation in the Philippines is diversity.
Philippine language experts predict, especially after the 1987 Constitutional deliberations, that Pilipino will be renamed Filipino characterized by an openness to borrowings from the other Philippine languages as well as from English, Spanish, and other foreign languages (Gonzales 1991: 126).
There are other prominent feautres of the language such as; the use of markers in a sentence, the reduplication of a syllable in a word, and the use of particles between words and phrases.
www.seasite.niu.edu /Tagalog/Tagalog_Homepage99/the_tagalog_language.htm   (938 words)

  
 Samoan Language
Samoan is a member of the Austronesian language family, which ranges from southern Taiwan in the north east, down to the Easter Islands, across to New Zealand, up to Papua New Guinea, as far north as parts of Vietnam and across the Indian Ocean to Madagascar.
It is very similar to the other Polynesian languages; early European travellers to the South Pacific picked up translators from one island group and were able to use them in all the polynesian island groups they visited.
Samoan is similar to some of the Indonesian languages in that there may be two words for the same object depending upon the status of the person the object belongs to.
www.samoa.co.uk /samoan_language.html   (357 words)

  
 Essays on Philippine Languages
Language and culture are, after all, inseparable, with the people's lexicon mirroring their culture.
language which, based on the principal dialects of the Islands, might constitute the means of inter-communication of ideas in the entire Archipelago, and which might obviate the absolute need now felt of using a common foreign tongue as a means of transmission of ideas, sentiments, and aspirations of the inhabitants of the Philippines." (Romualdez,1936: p.302).
This bilingual approach serves to promote the intellectualization of the national language --that is, to use it as medium of intellectual exchanges in the academe, government offices, as well as in other disciplines in the process of acquiring knowledge about the world which could be expressed by the said language.
www.seasite.niu.edu /Tagalog/essays_on_philippine_languages.htm   (4668 words)

  
 Polynesian languages   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
They are generally considered to be a part of the Austronesian language group, belonging to the Eastern Malayo-Polynesian branch of that family.
This is primarily due to fact that many Polynesian territories were settled relatively recently, and there has not yet been sufficient time for the languages to diverge.
Examples of words remaining similar across different languages include the word for "sky" (Maori and Rapanui: rangi; Samoan and Tongan: langi; Hawaiian: lani) and the word for "house" (Maori: whare; Tahitian: fare, Samoan: fale).
www.sciencedaily.com /encyclopedia/polynesian_languages   (266 words)

  
 Polynesian Languages Conference - Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori - Māori Language Commission
The importance of language in expressing cultural identity, maintaining integrity and ensuring viability as a community is becoming evident.
As a consequence, Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori (Māori Language Commission) decided to call representatives of the Polynesian nations together to discuss those issues and to discuss the formation of a permanent group.
As a consequence, at a meeting hosted by Te Taura Whiri i te Reo Māori in Hamilton, New Zealand from 21-23 February 1991, the Polynesian Languages Forum was established.
www.tetaurawhiri.govt.nz /english/events_e/polynesian_conference.shtml   (397 words)

  
 Endangered Languages of the Pacific Region   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Pacific languages are also characterized by the small size of speaker populations and by the absence of dominant languages.
A pidgin language is formed from elements of the grammar of both contributing languages, though the pidgin languages tend to be looked down upon from the perspective of the more dominant of the two parent languages.
All of the threatened languages are in danger because of their status as indigenous minority languages positioned at the lowest level of the linguistic hierarchy.
www.elpr.bun.kyoto-u.ac.jp /essay/sakiyama.htm   (2876 words)

  
 Polynesian languages --¬† Encyclop√¶dia Britannica
The languages of these two families are spoken in an area extending from the island of Madagascar in the west to Easter Island in the east and as far northward as the Himalayas.
The seven languages in the Micronesian group, all closely related, are the Nuclear Micronesian languages, including Marshallese, Gilbertese, Chuukese,...
His book ‘Language', published in 1933, is considered one of the most important general treatments of linguistic science.
www.britannica.com /eb/article-9060709   (803 words)

  
 Philippines - Language Diversity and Uniformity   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Some eleven languages and eighty-seven dialects were spoken in the Philippines in the late 1980s.
Language divisions were nowhere more apparent than in the continuing public debate over national language.
Speakers of another regional language would most likely continue to use that language at home, Pilipino in ordinary conversation in the cities, and English for commerce, government, and international relations.
countrystudies.us /philippines/36.htm   (476 words)

  
 KryssTal : Language Families
Languages in the same family, share many common grammatical features and many of the key words, especially older words, show their common origin.
There is no correlation between the life of a people speaking a language and the complexity or otherwise of their language.
The languages of southern India (in contrast to the Indo-European languages of northern India).
www.krysstal.com /langfams.html   (1206 words)

  
 Tahitian language and phrases
These languages, together with Tahitian, are East Polynesian languages and members of the vast Austronesian language family.
The relationship of these Polynesian languages to many Micronesian and Melanesian languages, such as Fijian, is more remote but still evident, as is the affiliation of all the above to the enormous Austronesian (or "Malayo-Polynesian") language family which encompasses most languages of Oceania, Indonesia (e.g.
Because of the way the Tahitian language is pronounced, it is generally easier for Americans to pronounce Tahitian words than it is for them to pronounce words in French.
www.tahiti-explorer.com /language.html   (514 words)

  
 [No title]
Presently, there are twenty recognized tribes, only nine of which still retain their own language and culture.
However, the languages spoken by Yami and Batanese are mutually intelligible.
LANGUAGE The Yami language is Bashiic, a Malayo-Polynesian tongue.
www.sinica.edu.tw /~dlproj/article/ET-t/Yami.txt   (5003 words)

  
 Languages : Malayo-Polynesian Family
Although covering a large geographical area, the languages are remarkably uniform in structure.
It was the language of a pre-Vietnamese Hindu Chamba Empire.
The speakers of this language family are thought to have originated in southern China (the Yellow River valleys) and migrated via Taiwan into the islands of the Philippines (about 2500BC), Indonesia and out into the Pacific (about 1000BC).
www.krysstal.com /langfams_malayo.html   (473 words)

  
 Leoki: A Powerful Voice of Hawaiian Language Revitalization   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
Hawaiian was a strictly oral language until the "discovery" of the islands by Europeans in 1778, followed by the arrival of American missionaries in 1820.
The Hawaiian language was banned from the schools, and, for all practical effects, from society, under punishment of ostracization and beatings.
Hawaiian language study began to soar at the university level, from 27 enrolled students at the University of Hawai‘i at Mänoa in 1961-1962 to 1,277 in 1992-1993.
www.gse.uci.edu /markw/leoki.html   (3908 words)

  
 Polynesian languages -- Facts, Info, and Encyclopedia article   (Site not responding. Last check: 2007-11-07)
(The family of languages spoken in Australia and Formosa and Malaysia and Polynesia) Austronesian
(The branch of the Austronesian languages spoken from Madagascar to the central Pacific) Malayo-Polynesian
The Polynesian languages are a group of related (A systematic means of communicating by the use of sounds or conventional symbols) languages spoken in the region known as (The islands in the eastern part of Oceania) Polynesia.
www.absoluteastronomy.com /encyclopedia/P/Po/Polynesian_languages.htm   (369 words)

  
 Polynesian languages - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
Polynesian languages - Encyclopedia, History, Geography and Biography
Examples of words remaining similar across different languages include the word for "sky" (Maori and Rapanui: rangi; Samoan and Tongan: langi; Hawai'ian: lani; North Marquesan: ‘aki; South Marquesan: ‘ani) and the word for "house" (Maori: whare; Tahitian: fare, Samoan: fale, Hawai'ian hale, N. Marq.
Certain correspondences can be noted between different Polynesian languages.
www.arikah.com /encyclopedia/Polynesian_languages   (349 words)

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